From 1 - 10 / 854
  • Extensive benefits and tools can be gained for mineral explorers, land-users and government and university researchers using new spectral data and processing techniques. Improved methods were produced as part of a large multi-agency project focusing on the world-class Mt Isa mineral province in Australia. New approaches for ASTER calibration using high-resolution HyMap imagery through to testing for compensation for atmospheric residuals, lichen and other vegetation cover effects have been included in this study. . Specialised data processing software capable of calibrating and processing terabytes of multi-scene imagery and a new approach to delivery of products, were developed to improve non-specialist user interpretation and comparison with other datasets within a GIS. Developments in processing and detailed reporting of methodology, accuracies and applications can make spectral data a more functional and valuable tool for users of remote sensing data. A highly-calibrated approach to data processing, using PIMA ground samples to validate the HyMap, and then calibrating the ASTER data with the HyMap, allows products to have more detailed reliable accuracies and integration with other data, such as geophysical and regolith information in a GIS package, means new assessments and interpretations can be made in mapping and characterising materials at the surface. Previously undiscovered or masked surface expression of underlying materials, such as ore-deposits, can also be identified using these methods. Maps and products made for this project, covering some ~150 ASTER scenes and over 200 HyMap flight-lines, provide a ready-to-use tool that aids explorers in identifying and mapping unconsolidated regolith material and underlying bedrock and alteration mineralogy.

  • This map shows the boundaries of the security regulated port for the purposes of the Maritime Transport & Offshore Facilities Security Act 2003.

  • This document presents an assessment of two earthquake scenarios in Melbourne. The two earthquake scenarios are considered the maximum magnitude earthquakes possible on the two fault structures; the Beaumaris Monocline and the Selwyn Fault. The assessments are based on using GA's earthquake risk modelling software, EQRM. The software is an open-source code that is capable of modelling earthquake scenario ground motion and scenario loss. Necessary inputs include the geometry of the fault structures, appropriate ground-motion and site classification models for the area concerned and exposure information describing the built environment. Impact assessment outputs include ground shaking intensity and residential loss estimates. The information from this scenario assessment can be used to inform emergency management planning and preparation in Victoria and support the national understanding of earthquake impact.

  • Inland sulfidic soils have recently formed throughout wetlands of the Murray River floodplain associated with increased salinity and river regulation (Lamontagne et al., 2006). Sulfides have the potential to cause widespread environmental degradation both within sulfidic soils and down stream depending on the amount of carbonate available to neutralise acidity (Dent, 1986). Sulfate reduction is facilitated by organic carbon decomposition, however, little is known about the sources of sedimentary organic carbon and carbonate or the process of sulfide accumulation within inland sulfidic wetlands. This investigation uses stable isotopes from organic carbon (13C and 15N), inorganic sulfur (34S) and carbonate (13C and 18O) to elucidate the sources and cycling of sulfur and carbon within sulfidic soils of the Loveday Disposal Basin.

  • The tragic events of the Indian Ocean tsunami on 26 December 2004 highlighted shortcomings in the alert and response systems for tsunami threats to Western Australia's (WA) coastal communities. To improve community awareness and understanding of tsunami hazard and potential impact for Western Australia, the Fire and Emergency Services Authority of WA (FESA) established a collaborative partnership with GA in which science and emergency management expertise was applied to identified communities.

  • Deep seismic reflection profiles collected offshore during a circum-navigation of Tasmania have provided fundamental information on the crustal architecture of the State. In particular, the profiles show the geometry of the boundaries between the major crustal elements, including the offshore continuation of the Arthur Lineament. These crustal element boundaries have apparent dips to the east or southeast and most of them appear to cut through the entire crust to the Moho. In eastern Tasmania, the seismic lines show an old mid-crustal extensional event followed by crustal shortening and duplexing, which probably occurred during the Cambrian-Ordovician Delamerian Orogeny. Thrusts that developed at this time were later reactivated as extensional faults during continental breakup of Pangea in the Cretaceous. Granites off the west coast have the geometry of flat, thin pancakes. In summary, the offshore seismic reflection program around Tasmania has led to a better understanding of the geometry and relationships between the basement elements of Tasmania and younger basins.

  • This map shows the boundary of the Maritime Security Zones for each port for the purpose of the Maritime Transport & Office Security Act 2003. 1 sheet (Colour) December 2009 Not for sale or public distribution Contact Manager LOSAMBA project, PMD

  • Geoscience Australia operations report on the deep seismic reflection survey conducted in Far North Queensland in 2007 including the AuScope seismic line. The report covers the survey numbers L184, L185 and L186. These include the seismic lines 07GA-IG1, 07GA-IG2, 07GA-GC1 and 07GA-A1.

  • At the request of Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C), Geoscience Australia (GA) prepared this report for the purposes of informing a National Security paper that highlights potential national security issues associated with climate change.

  • An A4 map showing Australia's Maritime Jurisdiction depicting Australia's extended continental shelf approved by the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf in April 2008. Also show GA's satellite reception areas. For internal use as at 10 July 2008.