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  • Geoscience Australia’s Exploring for the Future program provides precompetitive information to inform decision-making by government, community and industry on the sustainable development of Australia's mineral, energy and groundwater resources. By gathering, analysing and interpreting new and existing precompetitive geoscience data and knowledge, we are building a national picture of Australia’s geology and resource potential. This leads to a strong economy, resilient society and sustainable environment for the benefit of all Australians. This includes supporting Australia’s transition to a low emissions economy, strong resources and agriculture sectors, and economic opportunities and social benefits for Australia’s regional and remote communities. The Exploring for the Future program, which commenced in 2016, is an eight-year, $225m investment by the Australian Government. The Darling-Curnamona-Delamerian (DCD) 2D reflection seismic survey was acquired during May to August 2022 in the Delamerian Orogen, the Murray-Darling basin, the Curnamona Province, and the upper Darling River floodplain regions in South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales. This project is a collaboration between Geoscience Australia (GA), the Geological Survey of South Australia (GSSA), the Geological Survey of Victoria (GSV) and the Geological Survey of New South Wales (GSNSW) and was funded by the Australian Government’s Exploring for the Future (EFTF) program. The overall objective of the EFTF Darling-Curnamona-Delamerian project is to improve the understanding of mineral and groundwater resources of the Curnamona Province and Delamerian Orogen and overlying basin systems through acquisition and interpretation of new pre-competitive geoscience data sets. The total length of acquisition was 1256 km distributed over five deep crustal 2D reflection seismic lines 22GA-DL1 (446 km), 22GA-DL2 (249 km), 22GA-CD1 (287 km), 22GA-CD2 (178 km), 22GA-CD3 (39.5 km) to image deep crustal structures, and a high-resolution 2D reflection seismic line 22GA-UDF (56 km) to explore groundwater resources. The DL lines provide coverage of fundamental geophysical data over the Flinders Range, the Delamerian Province and the Murray-Darling basin region in eastern South Australia and Victoria. The CD lines extend through the Curnamona Province and into the Darling Basin. The UDF line will assist with refining the hydrogeological model, understanding groundwater dynamics, and locating areas better suited to groundwater bores for better quality groundwater in the upper Darling River floodplain area. The data processing was performed by a contractor under the supervision of Geoscience Australia. The five deep crustal lines (22GA-DL1,DL2,CD1,CD2,CD3) were processed with record lengths of 20 and 8 seconds, while the shallow high-resolution line (22GA-UDF) was processed at a 4 second length. This processing yielded DMO Stack, Post-Stack Time Migration, and Pre-Stack Time Migration products. <strong>Raw shot gathers and processed gathers for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 147423</strong>

  • Geochemical surveys deliver fundamental data, information and knowledge about the concentration and spatial distribution of chemical elements, isotopes and compounds in the natural environment. Typically near-surface sampling media, such as soil, sediment, outcropping rocks and stream or groundwater, are used. The application of such datasets to fields such as mineral exploration, environmental management, and geomedicine has been widely documented. In this presentation I reflect on a sabbatical experience with the Australian Federal Police (AFP) in 2017-2018 that allowed me to extend the interpretation of geochemical survey data beyond these established applications. In particular, with my collaborators we explore ways in which geochemical survey data and maps can be used to indicate the provenance of an evidentiary sample collected at a crime scene or obtained for instance from items belonging to a suspect intercepted at border entry. Because soils are extremely diverse mineralogically, geochemically and biologically, it should theoretically be possible to exclude very large swathes of territory (>90%) from further provenancing investigation using soil data. In a collaboration between Geoscience Australia (GA), the AFP and the University of Canberra (UC), a recent geochemical survey of the urban/suburban Canberra region in southeastern Australia is being used as a testbed for developing different approaches to forensic applications of geochemical surveys. A predictive soil provenancing method at the national scale was also developed and tested for application where no actual detailed, fit-for-purpose geochemical survey data exist. Over the next few years, GA, AFP and UC are collaborating with Flinders University to add biome data from soil and soil-derived dust to further improve the provenancing technique. This Abstract was presented at the 2021 Goldschmidt Conference (https://conf.goldschmidt.info/goldschmidt/2021/meetingapp.cgi)

  • The Historical Bushfire Boundaries service represents the aggregation of jurisdictional supplied burnt areas polygons stemming from the early 1900's through to 2022 (excluding the Northern Territory). The burnt area data represents curated jurisdictional owned polygons of both bushfires and prescribed (planned) burns. To ensure the dataset adhered to the nationally approved and agreed data dictionary for fire history Geoscience Australia had to modify some of the attributes presented. The information provided within this service is reflective only of data supplied by participating authoritative agencies and may or may not represent all fire history within a state.

  • We collected 38 groundwater and two surface water samples in the semi-arid Lake Woods region of the Northern Territory to better understand the hydrogeochemistry of this system, which straddles the Wiso, Tennant Creek and Georgina geological regions. Lake Woods is presently a losing waterbody feeding the underlying groundwater system. The main aquifers comprise mainly carbonate (limestone and dolostone), siliciclastic (sandstone and siltstone) and evaporitic units. The water composition was determined in terms of bulk properties (pH, electrical conductivity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, redox potential), 40 major, minor and trace elements as well as six isotopes (δ18Owater, δ2Hwater, δ13CDIC, δ34SSO4=, δ18OSO4=, 87Sr/86Sr). The groundwater is recharged through infiltration in the catchment from monsoonal rainfall (annual average rainfall ~600 mm) and runoff. It evolves geochemically mainly through evapotranspiration and water–mineral interaction (dissolution of carbonates, silicates, and to a lesser extent sulfates). The two surface waters (one from the main creek feeding the lake, the other from the lake itself) are extraordinarily enriched in 18O and 2H isotopes (δ18O of +10.9 and +16.4 ‰ VSMOW, and δ2H of +41 and +93 ‰ VSMOW, respectively), which is interpreted to reflect evaporation during the dry season (annual average evaporation ~3000 mm) under low humidity conditions (annual average relative humidity ~40 %). This interpretation is supported by modelling results. The potassium (K) relative enrichment (K/Cl mass ratio over 50 times that of sea water) is similar to that observed in salt-lake systems worldwide that are prospective for potash resources. Potassium enrichment is believed to derive partly from dust during atmospheric transport/deposition, but mostly from weathering of K-silicates in the aquifer materials (and possibly underlying formations). Further studies of Australian salt-lake systems are required to reach evidence-based conclusions on their mineral potential for potash, lithium, boron and other low-temperature mineral system commodities such as uranium. <b>Citation:</b> P. de Caritat, E. N. Bastrakov, S. Jaireth, P. M. English, J. D. A. Clarke, T. P. Mernagh, A. S. Wygralak, H. E. Dulfer & J. Trafford (2019) Groundwater geochemistry, hydrogeology and potash mineral potential of the Lake Woods region, Northern Territory, Australia, <i>Australian Journal of Earth Sciences</i>, 66:3, 411-430, DOI: 10.1080/08120099.2018.1543208

  • This map is part of the AUSTopo - Australian Digital Topographic Map Series. It covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:250 000 (1cm on a map represents 2.5 km on the ground) and comprises 516 maps. This is the largest scale at which published topographic maps cover the entire continent. Each standard map covers an area of approximately 1.5 degrees longitude by 1 degree latitude or about 150 kilometres from east to west and at least 110 kilometres from north to south. The topographic map shows approximate coverage of the sheets. The map may contain information from surrounding map sheets to maximise utilisation of available space on the map sheet. There are about 50 special maps in the series and these maps cover a non-standard area. Typically, where a map produced on standard sheet lines is largely ocean it is combined with its landward neighbour. These maps contain natural and constructed features including road and rail infrastructure, vegetation, hydrography, contours (interval 50m), localities and some administrative boundaries. Coordinates: Geographical and MGA Datum: GDA94, GDA2020, AHD. Projection: Universal Traverse Mercator (UTM) Medium: Digital PDF download.

  • This map is part of the AUSTopo - Australian Digital Topographic Map Series. It covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:250 000 (1cm on a map represents 2.5 km on the ground) and comprises 516 maps. This is the largest scale at which published topographic maps cover the entire continent. Each standard map covers an area of approximately 1.5 degrees longitude by 1 degree latitude or about 150 kilometres from east to west and at least 110 kilometres from north to south. The topographic map shows approximate coverage of the sheets. The map may contain information from surrounding map sheets to maximise utilisation of available space on the map sheet. There are about 50 special maps in the series and these maps cover a non-standard area. Typically, where a map produced on standard sheet lines is largely ocean it is combined with its landward neighbour. These maps contain natural and constructed features including road and rail infrastructure, vegetation, hydrography, contours (interval 50m), localities and some administrative boundaries. Coordinates: Geographical and MGA Datum: GDA94, GDA2020, AHD. Projection: Universal Traverse Mercator (UTM) Medium: Digital PDF download.

  • This map is part of the AUSTopo - Australian Digital Topographic Map Series. It covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:250 000 (1cm on a map represents 2.5 km on the ground) and comprises 516 maps. This is the largest scale at which published topographic maps cover the entire continent. Each standard map covers an area of approximately 1.5 degrees longitude by 1 degree latitude or about 150 kilometres from east to west and at least 110 kilometres from north to south. The topographic map shows approximate coverage of the sheets. The map may contain information from surrounding map sheets to maximise utilisation of available space on the map sheet. There are about 50 special maps in the series and these maps cover a non-standard area. Typically, where a map produced on standard sheet lines is largely ocean it is combined with its landward neighbour. These maps contain natural and constructed features including road and rail infrastructure, vegetation, hydrography, contours (interval 50m), localities and some administrative boundaries. Coordinates: Geographical and MGA Datum: GDA94, GDA2020, AHD. Projection: Universal Traverse Mercator (UTM) Medium: Digital PDF download.

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    Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. . This Tasmanian Tiers Airborne Magnetic, Radiometric and Digital Elevation Survey, TAS, 2021, (P5003), TMI RTP , first vertical derivative grid is the first vertical derivative of the TMI RTP grid of the Tasmanian Tiers Magnetic and Radiometric Survey, 2021 survey. This grid has a cell size of degrees (approximately 40m) , and given in units of nT per metre (nT/m). The data used to produce the TMI grid was acquired in 2021 by the TAS Government, and consisted of 32951 line-kilometres of data at 200m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance. The data has had a variable reduction to the pole applied to centre the magnetic anomaly over the magnetised body. The VRTP processing followed a differential reduction to pole calculation up to 5th order polynomial. Magnetic inclination and declination were derived from the IGRF-11 geomagnetic reference model using a data representative date and elevation representative of the survey. A first vertical derivative was calculated by applying a fast Fourier transform (FFT) process to the TMI RTP grid of the Tasmanian Tiers Magnetic and Radiometric Survey, 2021 survey to produce this grid. This grid was calculated using an algorithm from the INTREPID Geophysics software package. This grid shows the magnetic response of subsurface features with contrasting magnetic susceptibilities. The grid can also be used to locate structural features such as dykes.

  • This web map service shows the key Australian petroleum producing basins ranked by their potential for CO2 enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR), based on a study completed by Geoscience Australia in 2020. Basin rankings result from the assessment of six parameters: the API gravity of the oil, temperature, pressure, reservoir quality (porosity, permeability), nearby CO2 sources and existing infrastructure. Higher rankings indicate greater potential for CO2-EOR. For further information see: Tenthorey, E., and Kalinowski, A. 2022. Screening Australia’s Basins for CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery. Proceedings of the 16th Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies Conference (GHGT-16) 23-24 Oct 2022. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4294743 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4294743.

  • The seascape of the vast Australian continental margin is characterised by numerous submarine canyons that represent an equally vast array of geomorphic and oceanographic heterogeneity. Theoretically, this heterogeneity translates into habitats that may vary equally widely in their ecological characteristics. Here we describe the methodology to develop a framework to broadly derive estimates of potential habitat condition (¿suitability¿ sensu lato) for pelagic and epibenthic megafauna (including demersal fishes), and benthic infauna in all of Australia¿s known submarine canyons. We find that the high geomorphic and oceanographic diversity of submarine canyons creates a multitude of potential habitat types. In general, it appears that canyons may be particularly high-quality for benthic species. Canyons that incise the shelf tend to score higher in habitat potential than those confined to the slope. Canyons with particularly high habitat potential are located mainly off the Great Barrier Reef, the NSW coast, the eastern margin of Tasmania and Bass Strait, and on the southern margin. Many of these canyons have complex bottom topography, are likely to be productive, and have less intense sediment disturbance regimes. The framework presented here can be relevant ¿ once refined and comprehensively validated with ecological data - in a management and conservation context to identify canyons (or groups of canyons) that are likely to represent high-value habitat along a vast continental margin where marine planning decisions may require spatial prioritization decisions. <b>Citation:</b> Zhi Huang, Thomas A. Schlacher, Scott Nichol, Alan Williams, Franziska Althaus, Rudy Kloser, A conceptual surrogacy framework to evaluate the habitat potential of submarine canyons, <i>Progress in Oceanography</i>, Volume 169, 2018, Pages 199-213, ISSN 0079-6611, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pocean.2017.11.007