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  • The annual offshore petroleum exploration acreage release is part of the government’s strategy to promote offshore oil and gas exploration. Each year, the government invites companies to bid for the opportunity to invest in oil and gas exploration in Australian waters. The 21 areas shown have been nominated by petroleum industry stakeholders to be considered for the 2021 acreage release. Areas nominated for release will not receive endorsement from government until submissions resulting from a public consultation process can be considered. This publication does not indicate a commitment to a particular course of action.

  • The Source Rock and Fluids Atlas delivery and publication services provide up-to-date information on petroleum (organic) geochemical and geological data from Geoscience Australia's Organic Geochemistry Database (ORGCHEM). The sample data provides the spatial distribution of petroleum source rocks and their derived fluids (natural gas and crude oil) from boreholes and field sites in onshore and offshore Australian basins. The services provide characterisation of source rocks through the visualisation of Pyrolysis, Organic Petrology (Maceral Groups, Maceral Reflectance) and Organoclast Maturity data. The services also provide molecular and isotopic characterisation of source rocks and petroleum through the visualisation of Bulk, Whole Oil GC, Gas, Compound-Specific Isotopic Analyses (CSIA) and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GCMS) data tables. Interpretation of these data enables the characterisation of petroleum source rocks and identification of their derived petroleum fluids that comprise two key elements of petroleum systems analysis. The composition of petroleum determines whether or not it can be an economic commodity and if other processes (e.g. CO2 removal and sequestration; cryogenic liquefaction of LNG) are required for development.

  • The National Areas of Interest Layer for Seabed Mapping and Biodiversity Characterisation is an active WMS sustained by the Areas of Interest functionality of the AusSeabed Survey Coordination Tool (ASB SCT). The redevelopment of the functionality and tool were supported by in-kind investments from AusSeabed, FrontierSI, and the National Environmental Science Program Marine and Coastal Hub (MaC Hub) under a scoping project agreement. Objective: The Areas of Interest functionality allows organisations and communities to publish their seabed data needs through the AusSeabed portal as part of the Areas of Interest layer. When different organisations identify the same regions as Areas of Interest, it helps generate understanding of the regions where there is the greatest cumulative need for data. This will help prioritise the highest value areas for data acquisition or legacy data release. It will also allow different groups to see where they have common priorities and increase opportunities for collaboration.

  • Geoscience Australia and Monash University have produced a series of renewable energy capacity factor maps of Australia. Solar photovoltaic, concentrated solar power, wind (150 m hub height) and hybrid wind and solar capacity factor maps are included in this web service. Solar Photovoltaic capacity factor map The minimum capacity factor is <10% and the maximum is 25%. The map is derived from Bureau of Meteorology (2020) data. The scientific colour map is sourced from Crameri (2018). Concentrated Solar Power capacity factor map The minimum capacity factor is 52% and the maximum is 62%. The map is derived from Bureau of Meteorology (2020) data. Minimum exposure cut-off values used are from International Renewable Energy Agency (2012) and Wang (2019). The scientific colour map is sourced from Crameri (2018). Wind (150 m hub height) capacity factor map The minimum capacity factor is <15% and the maximum is 42%. The map is derived from Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (2015) and DNV GL (2016) data. The scientific colour map is sourced from Crameri (2018). Hybrid Wind and Solar capacity factor maps Nine hybrid wind and solar maps are available, divided into 10% intervals of wind to solar ratio (eg. (wind 40% : solar 60%), (wind 50% : solar 50%), (wind 60% : solar 40%) etc.). The maps show the capacity factor available for electrolysis. Wind and solar plants might be oversized to increase the overall running time of the hydrogen plant allowing the investor to reduce electrolyser capital expenditures for the same amount of output. Calculations also include curtailment (or capping) of excess electricity when more electricity is generated than required to operate the electrolyser. The minimum and maximum capacity factors vary relative to a map’s specified wind to solar ratio. A wind to solar ratio of 50:50 produces the highest available capacity factor of 64%. The maps are derived from Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (2015), DNV GL (2016) and Bureau of Meteorology (2020) data. The scientific colour map is sourced from Crameri (2018). Disclaimer The capacity factor maps are derived from modelling output and not all locations are validated. Geoscience Australia does not guarantee the accuracy of the maps, data, and visualizations presented, and accepts no responsibility for any consequence of their use. Capacity factor values shown in the maps should not be relied upon in an absolute sense when making a commercial decision. Rather they should be strictly interpreted as indicative. Users are urged to exercise caution when using the information and data contained. If you have found an error in this dataset, please let us know by contacting clientservices@ga.gov.au.

  • The annual offshore petroleum exploration acreage release is part of the government’s strategy to promote offshore oil and gas exploration. Each year, the government invites companies to bid for the opportunity to invest in oil and gas exploration in Australian waters. The areas shown have been nominated by petroleum industry stakeholders to be considered for the 2022 acreage release. Areas nominated for release will not receive endorsement from government until submissions resulting from a public consultation process can be considered. This publication does not indicate a commitment to a particular course of action.

  • This web service provides access to the Foundation Rail Infrastructure dataset. This contains the spatial locations and attributes of Railway lines and Railway Station points.

  • This service provides header and observation data for gravity stations located throughout continental Australia and Remote Offshore Territories. Data sources include the Australian National Gravity Database (ANGD) and the Australian Fundamental Gravity Network (AFGN) maintained by Geoscience Australia (GA). Data has been obtained by Surveyors, Commonwealth and state/territory Governments, private companies, and educational institutions. Gravity data measures small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose.

  • This web service features Australian hydrogen projects that are actively in the investigation, construction, or operating phase, and that align with green hydrogen production methods as outlined in Australia's National Hydrogen Strategy. The purpose of this dataset is to provide a detailed snapshot of hydrogen activity across Australia, and includes location data, operator/organisation details, and descriptions for all hydrogen projects listed.

  • This OGC WMS web service (generated by Geoserver) serves data from the Geoscience Australia Rock Properties database. The database stores the results of measurements of physical properties of rock and regolith specimens, including such properties as mass density, magnetic susceptibility, magnetic remanence and electrical conductivity. The database also records analytical process information such as method and instrument details where possible.

  • This service provides access to hydrochemistry data (groundwater and surface water analyses) obtained from water samples collected from Australian water bores or field sites.