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  • The 1:250 000 maps show the type and distribution of 51 regolith-landform units with unique dominant regolith-landform associations, and are a subset of the 205 mapping units on the six 1:100 000 maps. These units are distinct patterns of recurring landform elements with characteristic regolith associations. Geomorphic symbols indicate the location and type of geomorphic activity. The maps present a systematic analysis and interpretation of 1:89 000 scale 1973 RC9 aerial photography, 1:100 000 scale topographic maps (AUSLIG), and field mapping data. High resolution (250m line spacing) airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and magnetics (Geoterrex) were used where applicable

  • The 1:250 000 maps show the type and distribution of 51 regolith-landform units with unique dominant regolith-landform associations, and are a subset of the 205 mapping units on the six 1:100 000 maps. These units are distinct patterns of recurring landform elements with characteristic regolith associations. Geomorphic symbols indicate the location and type of geomorphic activity. The maps present a systematic analysis and interpretation of 1:89 000 scale 1973 RC9 aerial photography, 1:100 000 scale topographic maps (AUSLIG), and field mapping data. High resolution (250m line spacing) airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and magnetics (Geoterrex) were used where applicable

  • The Sydney Basin encloses a significant proportion of the Australian population, and the 1989 M5.6 Newcastle earthquake demonstrated that the basin is not immune from the impact of even relatively modest earthquakes. In spite of this, few investigations have been conducted to identify and characterise potential geologic sources of strong ground shaking. A recent major study of the southern part of the basin commented that - The available data are less complete than ideal for the purposes of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. - Essentially, the extreme infrequency of large earthquake events in intraplate regions, such as Australia, means that the short historic record of seismicity is poorly suited to the task of assessing seismic hazard. Hence, geologic, geomorphic and paleoseismic knowledge has a vital role to play in obtaining constraint on the probable location and recurrence of large and damaging earthquakes near Sydney. In April 2005 a one day workshop at the University of Sydney brought together a diverse range of researchers with experience in the geology and geomorphology of the Sydney Basin, neotectonics and seismic hazard science. A series of seminars were presented covering geology, geomorphology, seismicity and seismic hazard. These served as a nucleation point for subsequent discussion, and the drafting of the papers presented herein. This proceedings volume contains within its covers tools for understanding large earthquake occurrence within the Sydney Basin and compiles 12 papers addressing landscape and structural developement, and seismic hazard aspects, of the Lapstone Structural Complex west of Sydney. Hence, it represents a framework upon which future advances in our understanding of the seismic hazard posed to Australia's largest population centre may be based.

  • The Byrock 1:100,000 regolith-landform map illustrates the distribution of regolith materials and the landforms on which they occur, described using the RTMAP scheme developed by Geoscience Australia, together with the total magnetic intensity image of the map sheet

  • The Cobar 1:500,000 regolith-landform map illustrates the distribution of regolith materials and the landforms on which they occur, described using the RTMAP scheme developed by Geoscience Australia

  • The Cobar Goldfield North 1;10,000 regolith-landform map illustrates the distribution of regolith materials and the landforms on which they occur, described using the RTMAP scheme developed by Geoscience Australia

  • The Cobar Goldfield South 1;10,000 regolith-landform map illustrates the distribution of regolith materials and the landforms on which they occur, described using the RTMAP scheme developed by Geoscience Australia