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  • The 1:250 000 maps show the type and distribution of 51 regolith-landform units with unique dominant regolith-landform associations, and are a subset of the 205 mapping units on the six 1:100 000 maps. These units are distinct patterns of recurring landform elements with characteristic regolith associations. Geomorphic symbols indicate the location and type of geomorphic activity. The maps present a systematic analysis and interpretation of 1:89 000 scale 1973 RC9 aerial photography, 1:100 000 scale topographic maps (AUSLIG), and field mapping data. High resolution (250m line spacing) airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and magnetics (Geoterrex) were used where applicable

  • The 1:250 000 maps show the type and distribution of 51 regolith-landform units with unique dominant regolith-landform associations, and are a subset of the 205 mapping units on the six 1:100 000 maps. These units are distinct patterns of recurring landform elements with characteristic regolith associations. Geomorphic symbols indicate the location and type of geomorphic activity. The maps present a systematic analysis and interpretation of 1:89 000 scale 1973 RC9 aerial photography, 1:100 000 scale topographic maps (AUSLIG), and field mapping data. High resolution (250m line spacing) airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and magnetics (Geoterrex) were used where applicable

  • The 1:250 000 maps show the type and distribution of 51 regolith-landform units with unique dominant regolith-landform associations, and are a subset of the 205 mapping units on the six 1:100 000 maps. These units are distinct patterns of recurring landform elements with characteristic regolith associations. Geomorphic symbols indicate the location and type of geomorphic activity. The maps present a systematic analysis and interpretation of 1:89 000 scale 1973 RC9 aerial photography, 1:100 000 scale topographic maps (AUSLIG), and field mapping data. High resolution (250m line spacing) airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and magnetics (Geoterrex) were used where applicable

  • The 1:250 000 maps show the type and distribution of 51 regolith-landform units with unique dominant regolith-landform associations, and are a subset of the 205 mapping units on the six 1:100 000 maps. These units are distinct patterns of recurring landform elements with characteristic regolith associations. Geomorphic symbols indicate the location and type of geomorphic activity. The maps present a systematic analysis and interpretation of 1:89 000 scale 1973 RC9 aerial photography, 1:100 000 scale topographic maps (AUSLIG), and field mapping data. High resolution (250m line spacing) airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and magnetics (Geoterrex) were used where applicable

  • The 1:250 000 maps show the type and distribution of 51 regolith-landform units with unique dominant regolith-landform associations, and are a subset of the 205 mapping units on the six 1:100 000 maps. These units are distinct patterns of recurring landform elements with characteristic regolith associations. Geomorphic symbols indicate the location and type of geomorphic activity. The maps present a systematic analysis and interpretation of 1:89 000 scale 1973 RC9 aerial photography, 1:100 000 scale topographic maps (AUSLIG), and field mapping data. High resolution (250m line spacing) airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and magnetics (Geoterrex) were used where applicable

  • Atlas of Regolith Materials of Queensland. Companion to the 1:2,500,00 Queensland Regolith-Landform Map and GIS. Both broad and detailed regolith mapping and characterisation of materials was used to build an understanding of the regolith and its associated landforms. This state-wide overview contributes significantly to understanding the regolith and landform processes and regolith materials of Australian arid and coastal environments. This Queensland study extends seamlessly from the Northern Territory Regolith Landform Map and provides a broad-scale framework fro guiding geochemical prospecting for a wide range of minerals and materials.

  • The Frome airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey was designed to provide reliable pre-competitive AEM data to aid the search for energy and mineral resources around the Lake Frome region of South Australia. Flown in 2010, a total of 32,317 line kilometres of high quality airborne geophysical data were collected over an area of 95,450 km2 at a flight line spacing mostly of 2.5 km, opening to 5 km spaced lines in the Marree-Strzelecki Desert area to the north. The Lake Frome region hosts a large number of sandstone-hosted uranium deposits with known resources of ~60,000 tonnes of U3O8 including the working In Situ Recovery (ISR) operations at Beverley, Pepegoona, Pannikin and Honeymoon, and deposits at Four Mile East, Four Mile West, Yagdlin, Goulds Dam, Oban and Junction Dam. The aims of the Frome AEM Survey were to map critical elements of sandstone-hosted uranium mineral systems including basin architecture, palaeovalley morphology, sedimentary facies changes, hydrological connections between uranium sources and uranium sinks and structures that may control uranium mineralisation. Interpretations of the data show the utility of regional AEM surveying for mapping sandstone-hosted uranium mineral systems as well as for mapping geological surfaces and depth of cover over a wide area. Data from the Frome AEM Survey allow mineral explorers to put their own high-resolution AEM surveys into a regional context. Survey data were used to map a range of geological features that are associated with, or control the location of, sandstone-hosted uranium mineral systems and have been used to map and assess the prospectivity of new areas to the north of the Flinders Ranges.