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  • In 2009 Geoscience Australia (GA), Australia's national geoscience agency, initiated a project to update the National Earthquake Hazard Map for Australia. This talk will summarise the work done by the Earthquake Hazard Section to update the National Earthquake Hazard Maps and will also present the new maps themselves. The maps have mainly been designed to be used as a basis informing Australia's earthquake loading code. However they can also be used to help to improve Australia's ability to better prepare for earthquakes more generally. This talk will provide a brief overview of the work done for this project. Topics to be highlighted in this talk include how we put together a new catalogue of earthquakes for Australia and revised their magnitudes. Our new method for automatically classifying earthquakes as main shocks, foreshocks and aftershocks will also be discussed, as well the new set of earthquake source zones we have produced. In addition, the talk will also discuss new way we have tried to estimate the maximum expected magnitude for earthquakes in Australia from the results of GA's neotectonics program. The completely new set ground motion prediction equations for eastern Australia we have produced will also be presented. Finally, the talk will also show the revised and updated set of earthquake hazard maps based on the latest version of GA's EQRM (Earthquake Risk Model) code. The hazard and spectral curves for selected locations around Australia will be shown and the potential implications for earthquake risk will be briefly discussed. From the 9th International CO2 conference, Beijing 2013

  • To determine the magnitude of severe wind gust hazard due to thunderstorm downbursts using regional climate model output and analysis of observed data (including radar reflectivity and proximity soundings).

  • In late 2012, Cyclone Evan swept across Samoa and Fiji, wreaking a path of destruction. Losses in Samoa were estimated at A$200 million - somewhere around 30% of Samoa's GDP. The capacity of small island states in the Pacific to recover from such large impacts is hampered by their small economies and comparatively high vulnerability to the impacts of natural hazards. What are the chances of an impact the size of Evan? And will the magnitude of those losses change under future climate scenarios due to changes in tropical cyclone activity? The Tropical Cyclone Risk Assessment in the Pacific Region project delivered information and methods for evaluating vulnerability and risks from tropical cyclones. This project was supported under the Pacific-Australia Climate Change Science and Adaptation Planning Program with co-financing from the Global Fund for Disaster Risk Reduction. A collaboration between the Australian Government Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education, Geoscience Australia and AIR Worldwide, the project drew together complementary skills to deliver an integrated and consistent risk assessment of likely damages to key infrastructure and assets in the Pacific from future tropical cyclones arising from severe winds and other hazards. This risk information will allow partner country governments to better integrate climate risk considerations into infrastructure development and ex-ante disaster planning. The presentation will detail the methods used in the analysis, and present outcomes of the risk assessment for current and future climate scenarios.

  • Tsunamis pose considerable risk to coastal communities around the globe and understanding this risk is a key aspect of emergency management and risk reduction. This paper explores the nature and extent of tsunami hazard to NSW coastal communities and informs tsunami emergency planning and management. We outline the results of recent risk scoping which have examined sources of tsunami hazard, and tsunami history together with results of inundation studies for selected sites and discuss the level of tsunami risk to these NSW communities. We also outline how the results have complimented research by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in confirming tsunami warning thresholds for NSW. Work undertaken to date indicates the coast of NSW has a moderate tsunami hazard level. Whilst historical impact of tsunami inundation in NSW has been relatively minor, and generally restricted to marine based events, the modelling of selected earthquake generated events indicates the potential for land inundation particularly at high (rare) return periods. Low lying populated communities around estuary foreshores are particularly at risk although results also indicate the potential for inundation of open coast sites at very high (very rare) return periods. The results confirm the need for and support the ongoing collaborative development of emergency management arrangements for tsunami.

  • The Bushfire Attack Level Toolbox provides access to ArcGIS geoprocessing scripts that calculate the Bushfire Attack Level (BAL) as per Method 1 in AS-3959 (2009). BAL is a measure of the severity of a building's potential exposure to ember attack, radiant heat and direct flame contact in the event of a bushfire. It serves as a basis for establishing the requirements for construction to improve protection of building elements from attack by bushfire. The BAL Maps and Exposure report provide maps of three communities in Western Australia, with indicative BAL levels, and the aggregate inventory of assets and population exposed to the different levels of BAL.

  • A multihazard (volcano, earthquake, tsunami) assessment for East New Britain Province, Papua New Guinea.

  • Internal advice on tsunami, earthquake and severe wind hazards for the Vanimo Port region, derived from large-scale hazard assessments. This advice (refer TRIM D2021-52746) was provided to the Australia Pacific Climate Partnership (APCP) as part of Geoscience Australia's (GA's) contributions to the program. (In confidence report to APCP, not for distribution)

  • During the last five years, the Australian aid program has supported a series of successful capacity-building activities for natural disaster risk assessment within neighboring Southeast Asian countries. Although the modality of engagement between the agencies has varied in each country context, the successes have been uniformly underpinned by strong, long-term bilateral government-to-government (G2G) relationships between Geoscience Australia (GA) and partner technical agencies.

  • Bookmark developed during the year of the 30th anniversary of the Newcastle earthquake and used to raise awareness of earthquakes and to provide information on what to do in an earthquake. As Geoscience Australia jointly operates the Joint Australian Tsunami Warning Centre with the Bureau of Meteorology, the bookmark also provides information on tsunami safety. Geoscience Australia identifies and characterises potentially tsunamigenic earthquakes and this information is used to initiate the tsunami warning chain.

  • As part of the 2018 National Seismic Hazard Assessment (NSHA), we compiled the geographic information system (GIS) dataset to enable end-users to view and interrogate the NSHA18 outputs on a spatially enabled platform. It is intended to ensure the NSHA18 outputs are openly available, discoverable and accessible to both internal and external users. This geospatial product is derived from the dataset generated through the development of the NSHA18 and contains uniform probability hazard maps for a 10% and 2% chance of exceedance in 50 years. These maps are calculated for peak ground acceleration (PGA) and a range of response spectral periods, Sa(T), for T = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 s. Additionally, hazard curves for each ground-motion intensity measure as well as uniform hazard spectra at the nominated exceedance probabilities are calculated for key localities.