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  • Geoscience Australia undertook a marine survey of the Leveque Shelf (survey number SOL5754/GA0340), a sub-basin of the Browse Basin, in May 2013. This survey provides seabed and shallow geological information to support an assessment of the CO2 storage potential of the Browse sedimentary basin. The basin, located on the Northwest Shelf, Western Australia, was previously identified by the Carbon Storage Taskforce (2009) as potentially suitable for CO2 storage. The survey was undertaken under the Australian Government's National CO2 Infrastructure Plan (NCIP) to help identify sites suitable for the long term storage of CO2 within reasonable distances of major sources of CO2 emissions. The principal aim of the Leveque Shelf marine survey was to look for evidence of any past or current gas or fluid seepage at the seabed, and to determine whether these features are related to structures (e.g. faults) in the Leveque Shelf area that may extend to the seabed. The survey also mapped seabed habitats and biota to provide information on communities and biophysical features that may be associated with seepage. This research, combined with deeper geological studies undertaken concurrently, addresses key questions on the potential for containment of CO2 in the basin's proposed CO2 storage unit, i.e. the basal sedimentary section (Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous), and the regional integrity of the Heywood Formation (the seal unit overlying the main reservoir). Underwater footage was collected from 49 stations, although quality varies between sites. Video files are located in folder 'SOL5754_TOWVID_VIDEOS'. Each avi file contains several video transects; the associated stations are noted in the file name. Real-time onboard video characterisations using the AIMS- TowedVid classification system are located in folder 'SOL5754_TOWVID_CSVs'. Still images are located in folder 'SOL5754_TOWVID_STILLS' with sub-folders named according to station number, followed by gear code (CAM=underwater camera system), then the deployment number. For example, 12CAM02 represents a video transect from station 12 that was the 2nd video transect of the survey. USBL (Ultra-short baseline) text files are located in folder 'SOL5754_USBL_FILES' and provide continuous navigational information on location, time (UTC) and depth of each video transect line.

  • Geoscience Australia conducted a marine survey (GA0345/TAN1411) of the north-eastern Browse Basin (Caswell Sub-basin) between 9 October and 9 November 2014 to acquire seabed and shallow geological information to support an assessment of the CO2 storage potential of the basin. The survey, undertaken as part of the Department of Industry and Science's National CO2Infrastructure Plan (NCIP), aimed to identify and characterise indicators of natural hydrocarbon or fluid seepage that may indicate compromised seal integrity in the region. The data collected during this survey complement sequence stratigraphic studies in the Caswell Sub-basin that provide constraints on the most suitable areas for storage of CO2 and help to identify potential CO2 storage reservoirs. The results of this work are published in GA Record 2015/XX (Geocat 83120). The survey was conducted in three legs aboard the New Zealand research vessel RV Tangaroa, and included scientists and technical staff from GA, the NZ National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Ltd. (NIWA) and Fugro Survey Pty Ltd. Pre-survey site selection was informed by mapping fault networks and potential fluid-flow pathways connecting the regional seal to the seabed over interpreted CO2 storage play fairways and through interpretation of associated amplitude anomalies in 2D and 3D seismic data. Shipboard data collected included multibeam sonar bathymetry and backscatter over 12 areas (A1, A2, A3, A4, A6b, A7, A8, B1, C1, C2b, F1, M1) totalling 455 km2 in water depths ranging from 90 430 m, and 611 km of sub-bottom profile lines. Seabed samples were collected from 48 stations and included 104 Smith-McIntyre grabs and 41 piston cores. An Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) collected higher-resolution multibeam sonar bathymetry and backscatter data, totalling 30 km2, along with 107 line km of side scan sonar, underwater camera and sub-bottom profile data. Eighteen Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) missions collected 31 hours of underwater video, four grabs and one core. Shipboard and AUV multibeam bathymetry and sub-bottom profiler data indicated the presence of recently active faults in the area, some with significant seafloor surface expression (i.e. fault scarps with up to 40m offset). Some of these faults were visually inspected by the ROV which also confirmed the presence of diverse biological communities. Possible indications of shallow gas were observed on sub-bottom profiles, including amplitude anomalies, cross-cutting reflectors and zones of signal starvation. Water column observations including sidescan sonar, single-beam and multibeam echosounders, underwater video and photography did not conclusively identify hydrocarbon or other fluid seepage. Strong currents encountered during parts of the survey may have interfered with the direct detection of seeps in the water column. While no active signs of seepage were observed, the geochemical and biological sampling undertaken will aid in baseline environmental investigations for this region.

  • Geoscience Australia has been updating its collection of navigation for marine surveys in Australia. These include original navigation files, the 2003 SNIP navigation files and survey track maps along with survey acquisition reports. The result will be an updated cleansed navigation collection. The collection is based on the standard P190 extended header navigation file which follows the UKOOA standard. Industry standard metadata associated with a seismic survey is preserved. To assist industry, Geoscience Australia is making available its updated version of cleansed navigation. Although the process of updating the navigation data is ongoing and there is still legacy data to check, the navigation data is at point where a significant improvement has been achieved and it is now usable. Users should be aware that this navigation is not final and there may be errors. The KML file can be viewed using a range of applications including Google Earth, NASA WorldWind, ESRI ArcGIS Explorer, Adobe PhotoShop, AutoCAD3D or any other earth browser (geobrowser) that accepts KML formatted data. Alternatively the Shapefiles can be downloaded and viewed using any application that supports shape files.

  • In September and October of 2011 Geoscience Australia surveyed part of the offshore northern Perth Basin in order to map potential sites of natural hydrocarbon seepage. The primary objectives of the survey were to map the spatial distribution of seepage sites and characterise the nature of the seepage at these sites (gas vs oil, macroseepage vs microseepage; palaeo vs modern day seepage) on the basis of: acoustic signatures in the water column, shallow subsurface and on the seabed; geochemical signatures in rock and sediment samples and the water column; and biological signatures on the seabed. Areas of potential natural hydrocarbon seepage that were surveyed included proven (drilled) oil and gas accumulations, a breached structure, undrilled hydrocarbon prospects, and areas with potential signatures of fluid seepage identified in seismic, satellite remote sensing and multibeam bathymetry data. Within each of these areas the survey acquired: water column measurements with the CTD; acoustic data with single- and multi-beam echosounders, sidescan sonar and sub-bottom profiler (sidescan not acquired in Area F as it was too deep in places); and sediment and biological samples with the Smith-McIntyre Grab. In addition, data were collected with a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), integrated hydrocarbon sensor array, and CO2 sensor in selected areas. Sampling with the gravity corer had limited success in many of the more shallow areas (A-E) due to the coarse sandy nature of the seabed sediments. This dataset comprises mineraology of the upper 2 cm of seabed sediment. The minerals include quartz, calcite and aragonite. Data are also provided on the mol% of Mg calcite.

  • The dataset contains: ER-Mapper format grids files using 0.01 degree resolution, colour TIF format images shaded with sun angle and azimuth 45 degree, legend files to go with the images, source data density images, documentation.

  • This dataset contains species identifications of echinoderms collected during survey TAN0713 (R.V. Tangaroa, 7 Oct - 22 Nov 2007). Animals were collected from the Faust and Capel basins and Gifford Guyot with a boxcore, rock dredge, or epibenthic sled. Specimens were lodged at Museum of Victoria in June 2008. Species-level identifications were undertaken by Tim O'Hara at the Museum of Victoria and were delivered to Geoscience Australia on 1 July 2008. See GA Record 2009/22 for further details on survey methods and specimen acquisition. Data is presented here exactly as delivered by the taxonomist, and Geoscience Australia is unable to verify the accuracy of the taxonomic identifications.

  • This data provides an illustrative representation of Australian Mainland and Islands (as polygons) at a 1:100K and 1:1M scale. The data was extracted from Geodata 100K Coastline data and 1:1M Global Map data. Supplemented with generalised data from the GA Australian Maritime Boundaries GIS data product, and in the case of Antarctic coastline generalised publicly available SCAR data.

  • In September and October of 2011 Geoscience Australia surveyed part of the offshore northern Perth Basin in order to map potential sites of natural hydrocarbon seepage. The primary objectives of the survey were to map the spatial distribution of seepage sites and characterise the nature of the seepage at these sites (gas vs oil, macroseepage vs microseepage; palaeo vs modern day seepage) on the basis of: acoustic signatures in the water column, shallow subsurface and on the seabed; geochemical signatures in rock and sediment samples and the water column; and biological signatures on the seabed. Areas of potential natural hydrocarbon seepage that were surveyed included proven (drilled) oil and gas accumulations, a breached structure, undrilled hydrocarbon prospects, and areas with potential signatures of fluid seepage identified in seismic, satellite remote sensing and multibeam bathymetry data. Within each of these areas the survey acquired: water column measurements with the CTD; acoustic data with single- and multi-beam echosounders, sidescan sonar and sub-bottom profiler (sidescan not acquired in Area F as it was too deep in places); and sediment and biological samples with the Smith-McIntyre Grab. In addition, data were collected with a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), integrated hydrocarbon sensor array, and CO2 sensor in selected areas. Sampling with the gravity corer had limited success in many of the more shallow areas (A-E) due to the coarse sandy nature of the seabed sediments. This dataset comprises major and trace element concentrations in marine sediments.