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  • Species belonging to the superfamily Orthotetacea Williams form an important part of the Permian marine faunas of Western Australia. Four genera-Streptorhynchus King, Kiangsiella Chao, Derbyia Waagen,and PermoTthotetes gen. nov.-are represented. Twenty-one species are described and at least two others are indicated by incomplete collections. Many species appear to be restricted in range and are useful in stratigraphical correlation. The group of strophomenoid brachiopods now known as the superfamily Orthotetacea Williams 1953 has been for many years of interest to brachiopod students. Representative species are widely distributed throughout the world. The group attains its acme in the Upper Palaeozoic, particularly in Upper Carboniferous and Permian time. Six species only have hitherto been recorded in the Permian of Australia. One species has been described from the Permian of Eastern Australia-Streptorhynchus pelicanensis Fletcher, originally described by Etheridge in 1892 as Orthotetes senilis, from Queensland. Streptorhynchus perfidiabadensis (Etheridge) occurs at Treachery Bay, Northern Territory. Two species of Streptorhynchus and a Derbyia-like form were described from the Permian of Western Australia by Hosking (1932). In recent years extensive field work by geologists of the Bureau of Mineral Resources and of the University of Western Australia has added greatly to knowledge of the Western Australian Palaeozoic rocks and has augmented collections considerably. The Orthotetacea are now seen to be abundantly represented in Western Australia and are of considerable stratigraphical value. Four genera with at least 23 species can be distinguished in the Permian. The genus Schuchertella is known in the Devonian of the Fitzroy Basin and in the Lower Carboniferous Laurel Beds of the Fitzroy Basin. Schellwienella has lately been recognized in the Lower Carboniferous Septimus Limestone of the Bonaparte Gulf Basin and in the Lower Carboniferous Moogooree Limestone of the Carnarvon Basin. Schellwienella and an unidentified genus are present in the Carboniferous Weaber Group of the Bonaparte Gulf Basin of the Northern Territory.

  • The main purpose of this paper is to describe the morphology of a single genus of trilobite (Redlichia) and to discuss, and settle, the uncertainties of its stratigraphical and geographical distribution. Redlichia is the nominate genus of a family and a superfamily (suborder) and is consequently of paramount taxonomic significance. It is in its general organization related to the olenellids, but differs from them, as do the majority of trilobites, in having well-developed cephalic sutures. This paper was originally prepared in 1950-52; subsequently additions have been made in an attempt to exploit the wealth of new information published on trilobites between 1953 and 1957.

  • One hundred and six species of Permian foraminifera belonging to fortysix genera are discussed. Four new genera, Sacculinella, Hyperamminita, Pseudohyperammina, and Giraliarella are named, all belonging to the group of arenaceous foraminifera. Fifty-two new species are described. They include eighteen from the family Lagenidae. Since the publication of Foraminifera in the Permian Rocks of Australia (Crespin, 1947), Permian stratigraphy throughout the continent has received considerable attention from geologists engaged primarily in the search for oil and coal, but the only further publications on foraminifera have been by Crespin and Belford (1957) and Ludbrook (1957). Many stratigraphical sections have been closely studied, and the results of this work have led to the re-organization of ideas on the age and stratigraphical position of certain formations. In particular the Permian sequence in Western Australia has been mapped in some detail by geologists of the Bureau of Mineral Resources, oil companies, and the University of Western Australia, and large numbers or specimens have been examined by the author from both surface and subsurface sequences. In New South Wales, both coal and oil search have proved sources of prolific subsurface microfaunas in the Permian rocks. Surface mapping in the Hunter River area has also yielded good as assemblages of arenaceous foraminifera. Investigations in Western Australia revealed that the beds from which Ohapman and Parr (1937) described fusulinids (Neoschwagerina and Verbeekina) are not Permian but Triassic, and that the fusulinids are probably fish remains (Brunnschweiler, 1954). No rocks from New Guinea have been examined during the present work; two genera of Permian foraminifera (Pachypholia and Geinitzina) ,have been recorded from a limestone near Kuta, in the 'Western Highlands (Glaessner et al., 1950; Rickwood, 1955). Nearly all the species; included below have been studied by myself. Some I have been unable to examine personally; they are included, for completeness sake, but are described, if at all, by quotations from the original authors. During the preparation of this Bulletin, Dr. P. J. Coleman, Geology Department, University of Sydney, handed me an unfinished and undated manuscript by the late W. J. Parr and H. J. Ward on the Permian Foraminifera of the Callytharra Limestone , Western Australia. Coleman has not been able to find the specimens described in that paper; but from some of the descriptions it would seem that certain new species described in this Bulletin ,were recognized by Parr. Where it has been possible to recognize these forms, Parr's comments on them have been incorporated in the description of species.

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  • These documents have been scanned by the GA Library. Please refer to the document for contents.