From 1 - 10 / 213
  • The Geological Survey of Western Australia, in collaboration with the Australian National University, Macquarie University, the Department of Fire and Emergency Services and Geoscience Australia has just installed the first seismometers of an array across the South West Seismic Zone of Western Australia. This region is one of the most seismically active areas of Australia having experienced over 2000 small (between ML 2 to 3) earthquakes since the year 2000. Many smaller events are also noted by the local people who often hear them coming. Yes – hear them coming – this area is known for its “noisy” earthquakes. Most of these earthquakes occur in swarms rather than main shock-aftershock sequences (Dent, 2015). This means that the region experiences a lot of small earthquakes, all much the same size and which occur in a similar area. These swarms can be active for years. The hazard associated with these seismic events is relatively small. However, in the past six decades this region has also hosted five of the nine surface rupturing earthquakes in Australia, most notably; Meckering (M 6.5) in 1968 from which there are photos of the bends in the railway lines (Fig 1a) and faulting of 2-3 m in height across the fields (Fig 1b) (Gordon and Lewis 1980; Johnston and White 2018, Clark and Edwards 2018); Calingiri (M5.9) in 1970 and Lake Muir (M5.6), which was felt by a lot of people across Western Australia just two years ago (Clark et al. 2020). Despite the high rates of seismicity, seismic monitoring in the region remains relatively sparse. To overcome this lack of instrumentation, the consortium of institutions mentioned above, came together for an ARC Linkage project to put in place a temporary network- the South West Australia Network (SWAN) - to improve the monitoring and detection capabilities in this area. This project will see a total of twenty-five broadband seismometers deployed across the Southwest of Western Australia for a period of approximately 2 years (Fig 2a and b). This temporary array will enable the detection and location of smaller-magnitude earthquakes which can be used to improve the crustal velocity models which in turn enables more accurate earthquake locations and helps the understanding of the crustal structure of this part of Australia. Better velocity models also enable better magnitude calculation methods, which improve the knowledge about recurrence of earthquakes of a certain magnitude. From a seismic hazard point of view, this data has the potential to assist in the development of improved methods for modelling how shaking intensity varies as it propagates through the earth’s crust from the earthquake source. Overall, this information will feed into an improved understanding of the earthquake hazard in the Southwest region of Western Australia. For local communities, it will provide an improved situational awareness following significant earthquakes. More broadly, the improved understanding of the seismicity of the Southwest of Western Australia will enhance emergency response capabilities, and inform building codes and mitigation initiatives, which are the best methods we have to minimise the earthquake risks to communities. Data will be released through AusPASS, the Australian Passive Seismic Server two years after the last data has been collected.

  • The Eucla-Gawler 2D deep seismic survey L203 consists of one 834 km seismic line, 13GA-EG1. The data acquisition commenced on 28 November 2013, from Haig, WA and continued east along a road/track parallel to the Trans Australian Railway ending at Tarcoola, SA, on 7 February 2014. The reflection seismic data processing used standard processing and included special attention on refraction statics and deconvolution essential for optimal reflection imaging. High fold stacking provided enhanced seismic reflections in regions of no or weak reflectivity at standard fold. For most of the seismic line, the 20 s seismic data provide images of the full depth of the crust through this region.

  • The Bureau of Mineral Resources made a seismic survey in the western part of the Galilee Basin in the central Queensland in 1975. The aim of the survey was to obtain basic information on the extent and thickness of the western part of the basin, which is entirely concealed beneath the Eromanga Basin. The seismic survey recorded 320 km of continuous single-coverage reflection recording and 18 km of six-fold CDP recording during 87 operating days. Two major faults were mapped. The Holberton Structure, previously known from geological mapping, corresponds to a major fault in the subsurface with up to 300 m of downthrownto the west. Another major fault appears to be a southerly continuation of the Cork Fault. For the other two Galilee Basin surveys, please see L102 and L108. Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 74978

  • <p>Geoscience Australia conducted a seismic survey in the central Eromanga Basin in Queensland from July to Late November 1982. This survey was a continuation of the work undertaken in 1980 and 1981 to investigate the structure, stratigraphy, geological and tectonic evolution, and petroleum potential of the area. The survey obtained 485 km of six-fold Common-Depth-Point reflection data, in the Adavale Basin, Cooladdi Trough and Pleasant Creek Arch areas.<p><b>Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 74970</b>

  • <p>Geoscience Australia with assistance from the Geological Survey of Queensland conducted a seismic survey in southeast Queensland form April to December 1984. The survey set out to investigate deep structures within the earth's crust and is the first of the Australian Continental Reflection Profiling (ACORP), initiatives to study critical transects of the Australian lithosphere. The survey obtained 798 km of six-fold seismic reflection data over the Westgate Trough, Nebine Ridge, Surat Basin, Kumbarilla Ridge, and Clarence-Moreton Basin.<p><b>Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 74969</b>

  • Processed Stacked and Migrated SEG-Y seismic data and section images for the Southern Carnarvon Deep Crustal Seismic Survey. This survey was conducted under a National Geoscience Agreement with the Western Australia Geological Survey. Funding was through the Onshore Energy Security Program. The objective of the survey was to image the Byro Sub-basin of the onshore Carnarvon Basin. Data are supplied as SEG-Y files and PDF images. Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au

  • Processed seismic data (SEG-Y format) and TIFF images for the Gawler line acquired as part of the 2008 Curnamona-Gawler-Arrowie Deep Crustal Seismic Survey (L189), acquired by Geoscience Australia (GA) under the Onshore Energy Security Program (OESP). Stack and migrated data for line 08GA-G1 as well as CDP coordinates and gravity data. The Gawler line aimed to investiage the southern Gawler Province. It crosses over the Eyre Peninsula in an east -west direction and is 253km long. Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au

  • Processed seismic data (SEG-Y format) and TIFF images for the Curnamona - Gawler Link Dep Crustal Seismic survey (L191) acquired by Geoscience Australia (GA) in collaboration with Primary Industries and Resources South Australia (PIRSA). Stack and migrated data for line 09GA-CG1 as well as CDP coordinates data. The Curnamona- Gawler Link traverse is approximately 145km in line length and ties to the L164 Curnamona Seismic Line 03GA-CU1. Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au

  • Processed seismic data (SEG-Y format) and TIFF images for the Gawler-Officer-Musgrave-Amadeus (GOMA) Deep Crustal Seismic survey (L190) acquired by Geoscience Australia (GA) in collaboration with AuScope and Primary Industries and Resources South Australia (PIRSA). Stack and migrated data for line 09GA-OM1 as well as CDP coordinates data. This 634 line km traverse follows the Alice Springs to Adelaide railway line begining near Erldunda in the Northern Territory and finishing near Tarcoola in South Australia. Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au