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  • <p>Geoscience Australia conducted a seismic survey in the central Eromanga Basin in Queensland from July to Late November 1982. This survey was a continuation of the work undertaken in 1980 and 1981 to investigate the structure, stratigraphy, geological and tectonic evolution, and petroleum potential of the area. The survey obtained 485 km of six-fold Common-Depth-Point reflection data, in the Adavale Basin, Cooladdi Trough and Pleasant Creek Arch areas.<p><b>Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 74970</b>

  • <p>Geoscience Australia conducted a seismic survey in the central Eromanga Basin in Queensland in 1981. This survey was a continuation of the work undertaken in 1980 to investigate the structure, stratigraphy, geological and tectonic evolution, and petroleum potential of the area. The survey obtained 438 km of six-fold Common-Depth-Point seismic reflection data, in the Quilpie Trough and over the Cooper and Thomson Synclines.<p><b>Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 74971</b>

  • Geoscience Australia conducted the Albany Fraser Orogen 2D Seismic Survey in 2012. The survey involves the acquisition of seismic reflection and gravity Data over the Yilgarn Craton margin and the Albany Fraser Orogen of Western Australia. The survey consisted of four lines, totalling 677kms. The project is a collaborative project between Geoscience Australia and the Geological Survey of Western Australia and is part of the ongoing cooperation under the National Geoscience Agreement (NGA). Funding of this project is through the Western Australian Government's Royalties for Regions Exploration Incentive Scheme. The primary objective of the project is to Image the crustal architecture of the Yilgarn Craton margin and its relationship to the Albany-Fraser Orogen and establish the subsurface extent of the Yilgarn Craton beneath the Albany-Fraser Orogen, and look for mantle-tapping structures that may have provided fluid pathways for mineralization. The seismic lines are designed to cross several major faults, such as the Cundeelee Fault, the Fraser Fault, the Newman Shear Zone, and the Red Island Shear Zone. A 70km long deep crustal seismic line was also acquired near the Tropicana Gold mine with the assistance of AuScope Earth Imaging, Anglo Gold Ashanti and the Independence Group. The purpose of this line was to image the crustal architecture as well as to understand the structural geometry around the Tropicana gold deposit and help define prospective areas elsewhere along the belt. Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au

  • Seismic reflection traverses were surveyed across the Perth Basin at Cookernup, W.A. These traverses were planned to find the thickness and dip of the Basin sediments adjacent to the Darling Scarp and to discover any faulting or folding within them; also to determine the applicability of the seismic method as a tool for both regional and detailed investigation in this area. Seismic refraction traverses were surveyed to help in the solution of problems encountered in the interpretation of the reflection cross-sections. The survey indicated a considerable thickness of sediments about 20,000 ft, at the eastern margin of the Basin near the Darling Scarp, and suggested tectonic structure that is not indicated in surface geology, The reflection traverses indicated that sediments (presumably Lower Palaeozoic or Precambrian) lying deep in the Perth Basin may continue underneath the Darling Scarp and abut the granitic gneisses etc. of the Western Australian Shield on an overthrust fault plane. The overthrust fault, if it exists, does not reach the surface, but is covered to a depth of possibly some few hundred feet by younger sediments and also by alluvium eroded from the Darling Scarp. Some reflection and refraction shooting was done in an attempt to test this and other hypotheses, but the results crc inconclusive. Gravity results strongly suggest a normal fault, and if normal faulting is the case, the reflections from beneath the outcropping basement are possibly derived from shear zones, Some probable 'reflected refractions' were also observed. There is scope for further seismic testing but it is considered that conclusive evidence could only be provided by drilling.

  • A seismic reflection survey was made to the south-west, south and east of the Poole Range Structure, Kimberley Division, W.A. as an extension of a previous seismic survey. The results obtained confirm the surface information and show the existence of an anticlinal structure l the axis of which plunges to the east and whose axial plane probably dips to the south. A total thickness of sediments of the order of 20,000 feet is shown. Some slight evidence of deep faulting down to 10,000 feet was recorded, but is not conclusive. Insufficient evidence was obtained to select a site for a test bore, but further seismic work is not recommended at present.

  • Trace Energy Services was contracted by the Australian National Seismic Imaging Resource (ANSIR) to conduct the WA seismic 2004 survey in the eastern & northern Goldfields region of Western Australia. There were 148.59 km of 2D seismic reflection data recorded, 137.54 km over 29 traverses using Litton 315 Paystars and 11.05 km over 5 traverses using a single IVI Minivib as source. All lines were situated within the lease boundaries of gold mining companies, namely, Sons of Gwalia (Tarmoola & Gwalia) (L165), Placer Dome (Kanowna Belle, Wallaby, Granny Smith, Lancefield & Mt Morgans) (L166), Anglo Gold (Sunrise Dam) (L167) and Goldfields (St Ives at Kambalda) (L168), <b>Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 74865</b>

  • The Bureau of Mineral Resources conducted a seismic reflection survey of a small area near Broome, W.A., during 1954 and 1955. It was part of a general investigation of the Canning Basin and was aimed at determining the distribution of sediments south of the Fenton Fault. The seismic work indicated a sedimentary thickness of at least 6000 feet, and probably as much as 10,000 feet could be expected. It also showed that the subsurface formations are probably folded and faulted.

  • The Officer Basin project was a co-operative project jointly conducted by Geoscience Australia (GA) and the South Australian Department of Mines and Energy (DMESA) as part of the National Geoscience Mapping Accord (NGMA). The goals of the 1993 seismic acquisition in the Officer Basin were to provide a regional network of traverses to develop a cross section and evaluate basin morphology. The acquisition was designed to image the basin fill, with the aim of extending the stratigraphic control in the eastern Officer Basin into the central portion of this basin. The survey comprised five lines totalling 550 km in length. In 2021, Geoscience Australia commissioned reprocessing of these legacy 2D seismic data as part of the Exploring for the Future (EFTF) program, to improve data quality and better image reflective structural features in the region. Velseis Processing Pty Ltd carried out the reprocessing from March to August 2021. GA managed the reprocessing project, undertook quality control of the data processing and archived the processed data. This dataset includes metadata, images and SEGY files for pre-migration stacks, pre-stack time and depth migration stacks, and post-stack migration data. The images and SEGY files are derived from the Velseis final SEGY files. The reprocessed dataset is available for download. <b>Raw data and the Velseis data package for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 74944</b>

  • On 12th July 1960, a velocity survey of the A.A.O. Pickanjinnie No. 1 bore was made by the Bureau of Mineral Resources. The bore had been drilled to a depth of 5218 ft and was surveyed to the bottom. The average velocities for the Mesozoic rocks and the Timbury Hills Formation are similar to those measured in the Timbury Hill No. 2 bore. However, it seems impossible to correlate individual units within the Mesozoic sequence according to their velocity.

  • Following a month of preliminary experimental seismic work in the latter part.of 1964 the Bureau of Mineral Resources carried out a reconnaissance seismic survey of the southern part of the Georgina Basin, mainly in the Northern Territory, from April to October 1965. In most areas reflections proved very difficult to obtain. A number of different techniques were tried, including various shot andgeophone pattern arrangements, noise testing,collinear offset shooting, airshooting and multiple coverage, but no technique was found which was generally successful in providing useful reflections. The seismic results tended to confirm gravity indications that there is a shelf area between BMR 12 Bore and Tobermory and provided no indications that there are deep Palaeozoic troughs similar to the Toko -Syncline in the survey area.