From 1 - 10 / 67
  • <p>This package contains airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data from the "SkyTEM helicopter EM Howard East region" survey which was flown over Howard East region, Northern Territory during July - August 2017. The area is comprised of 2073.6 line kilometres in total. <p>The aim of the survey is to provide at a reconnaissance scale: <p>a) trends in regolith thickness and variability <p>b) variations in bedrock conductivity <p>c) conductivity of key bedrock (lithology related) conductive units under cover <p>d) the groundwater resource potential of the region <p>This report lists the SkyTEM system information and specifications relevant for this survey, and describes the processing carried out on the data. <p>Geoscience Australia commissioned the survey as part of the Exploring for the Future (EFTF) program. The EFTF program is led by Geoscience Australia (GA), in collaboration with the Geological Surveys of the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia, and is investigating the potential mineral, energy and groundwater resources in northern Australia and South Australia. The EFTF is a four-year $100.5 million investment by the Australian Government in driving the next generation of resource discoveries in northern Australia, boosting economic development across this region (https://www.ga.gov.au/eftf).

  • A SkyTEM airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey was flown over Surat and Galilee regions of Queensland, Australia during July 2017. The Surat-Galilee area was surveyed, with multiple survey sites in Orana, Injune and Galilee. The area is comprised of 1293 line kilometres in Orana, 552 line kilometres in Injune and 2922 line kilometres in Galilee. A total of 4767 line kilometres were flown for this survey. The projected grid coordinates have been supplied in GDA94 MGA Zone 55 for Galilee and Injune and in MGA zone 56 for Orana. The aim of the survey is to provide at a reconnaissance scale: a) trends in regolith thickness and variability b) variations in bedrock conductivity c) conductivity of key bedrock (lithology related) conductive units under cover d) the groundwater resource potential of the region e) palaeovalley systems known to exist in the region.

  • This report presents key results from hydrogeological investigations at Alice Springs, completed as part of Exploring for the Future (EFTF)—an eight year, $225 million Australian Government funded geoscience data and information acquisition program focused on better understanding the potential mineral, energy and groundwater resources across Australia. The Southern Stuart Corridor (SSC) project area within the Northern Territory extends in a north–south corridor from Tennant Creek to Alice Springs, encompassing four water control districts and a number of remote communities. Water allocation planning and agricultural expansion in the SSC is currently limited by a paucity of data and information regarding the volume and extent of groundwater resources and groundwater systems more generally. This includes recharge rates, surface water –groundwater connectivity, and the dependency of ecosystems on groundwater. Outside the proposed agricultural areas, the project includes numerous remote communities where there is a need to secure water supplies. Geoscience Australia, in partnership with the Northern Territory Department of Environment and Natural Resources and the Power and Water Corporation, undertook an extensive program of hydrogeological investigations between 2017 and 2019. Data acquisition included helicopter airborne electromagnetic (AEM) and magnetic data, investigative groundwater bore drilling, ground-based and downhole geophysical data (including nuclear magnetic resonance for mapping water content and induction conductivity/gamma for defining geological formations), and hydrochemistry for characterising groundwater systems. This report investigates the hydrogeology across the Alice Springs focus area, which includes the Roe Creek and proposed Rocky Hill borefields, where five hydrostratigraphic units were mapped based on AEM interpretation and borehole geophysical information. The mapping supports the presence of a syncline, with a gentle parabolic fold axis that plunges westward, and demonstrates that the main Siluro-Devonian Mereenie Sandstone and Ordovician Pacoota Sandstone aquifers are continuous from Roe Creek borefield to the Rocky Hill area. Areas with the highest potential for recharge to the Paleozoic strata are where Roe Creek or the Todd River directly overlie shallow subcrop of the aquifer units. Three potential recharge areas are identified: (1) Roe Creek borefield, (2) a 3 km stretch of Roe Creek immediately west of the proposed Rocky Hill borefield, and (3) the viticulture block to the east of Rocky Hill. Analysis of groundwater chemistry and regional hydrology suggests that the rainfall threshold for recharge of the Paleozoic aquifers is ~125 mm/month, and groundwater isotope data indicate that recharge occurs rapidly. The groundwaters have similar major ion chemistry, reflecting similar geology and suggesting that all of the Paleozoic aquifers in the focus area are connected to some degree. Groundwater extraction at Roe Creek borefield since the 1960s has led to the development of a cone of depression and a groundwater divide, which has gradually moved eastward and is now east of the proposed Rocky Hill borefield. The majority of the groundwater within the focus area is of good quality, with <1000 mg/L total dissolved salts (TDS). The brackish water (7000 mg/L TDS) further to the east of the proposed Rocky Hill borefield warrants further investigation to determine the potential risk of it being captured by the cone of depression following the development of this borefield. This study provides new insight to the hydrogeological understanding of the Alice Springs focus area. Specifically, this investigation demonstrates that the Roe Creek and proposed Rocky Hill borefields, and a nearby viticulture area are all extracting from the same aquifer system. This finding will inform the future management and security of the Alice Springs community water supply. New groundwater resource estimates and a water level monitoring scheme can be developed to support the management of this vital groundwater resource.

  • The Great Artesian Basin Research Priorities Workshop, organised by Geoscience Australia (GA), was held in Canberra on 27 and 28 April 2016. Workshop attendees represented a spectrum of stakeholders including government, policy, management, scientific and technical representatives interested in GAB-related water management. This workshop was aimed at identifying and documenting key science issues and strategies to fill hydrogeological knowledge gaps that will assist federal and state/territory governments in addressing groundwater management issues within the GAB, such as influencing the development of the next Strategic Management Plan for the GAB. This report summarises the findings out of the workshop.

  • Great Artesian Basin borehole porosity and permeability data from petroleum exploration wells within the GAB, quality checked by Jim Kellet (Geoscience Australia). Data is available in tabular format as a CSV file (comma delimited) and a Microsoft Excel 2010 file. This data set was produced for the Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment and reported in: Section 5.5 'Hydrogeological properties' of Ransley TR and Smerdon BD (eds) (2012) Hydrostratigraphy, hydrogeology and system conceptualisation of the Great Artesian Basin. A technical report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. Section 5.3 'Hydrology' of Smerdon BD and Ransley TR (eds) (2012) Water resource assessment for the Central Eromanga region. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. Section 5.3 'Hydrology' of Smerdon BD and Ransley TR (eds) (2012) Water resource assessment for the Surat region. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. This dataset and associated metadata can be obtained from www.ga.gov.au, using catalogue number 76562.

  • <p>Exploring for the Future (EFTF, <a href="http://www.ga.gov.au/eftf">http://www.ga.gov.au/eftf</a>) is a four-year (2016–2020) $100.5 million program investigating the mineral, energy and groundwater resource potential in northern Australia and parts of South Australia. The program is delivering new geoscience data, knowledge and decision support tools that support increased industry investment and sustainable economic development. <p>Geoscience Australia commissioned ACIL Allen Consulting to independently quantify the return on investment from selected EFTF projects that are representative of the nature of the work done under the program. The objective was to develop a plausible and economically robust estimate of the returns to government through increased government revenue as a result of the case study projects. Geoscience Australia would like to acknowledge the organisations that have contributed to or supported these EFTF case study projects. <p>The results of this independent analysis can be used to estimate the impact and value of the EFTF program as a whole relative to the funds invested in these activities. The evaluation framework used by ACIL Allen Consulting to assess the impact and value of Geoscience Australia’s pre-competitive geoscience under EFTF is one that has been used for similar assessments of similar organisations in the past. <p>The analysis shows that the benefits that could potentially flow to the Commonwealth as a result of the EFTF projects examined at least match what has been spent on the program, and the returns can be as much as an order of magnitude higher than the cost of the entire program.

  • Geoscience Australia and its predecessors have analysed the hydrochemistry of water sampled from bores, surface features, rainwater and core samples (pore water). Samples have been collected during drilling or monitoring projects, including Exploring for the Future (EFTF). The hydrochemistry database includes physical-chemical parameters (EC, pH, redox potential, dissolved oxygen), major and minor ions, trace elements, isotopes and nutrients. The resource is accessible via the Geoscience Australia Portal <a href="https://portal.ga.gov.au/">(https://portal.ga.gov.au/)</a>

  • Modelled groundwater levels from 2010 to 2070 used to estimate the impact of climate change and future groundwater resource development on groundwater levels in the GAB. The modelling considered different scenarios of climate and groundwater development: Scenario A (historical climate and current development); Scenario C (future climate and current development) and Scenario D (future climate and future development). This data set contains spatial data that were created from the outputs from the "A scenario" model and the "Base scenario" model, both of which were based on the GABtran groundwater flow model. The raster grid "A.grd" represents the spatial distribution of predicted hydraulic head for the year 2070 produced by the "A scenario" model. The raster grid "Base.grd" represents the modelled hydraulic head for the year 2010. The raster grid "A-Base.grd" represents the difference in predicted head from 2010 to 2070. 'No data' value is 1e30 Cell size is 5000m x 5000m This data and metadata were produced by CSIRO for the Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. For more information, please refer to Welsh WD, Moore CR, Turnadge CJ, Smith AJ and Barr TM (2012), "Modelling of climate and groundwater development. A technical report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment ". CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. Projection is Albers equal area conic, with central meridian 143 degrees longitude, standard parallels at -21 and -29 degrees latitude and latitude of projection's origin at -25.

  • Modelled groundwater levels from 2010 to 2070 used to estimate the impact of climate change and future groundwater resource development on groundwater levels in the GAB. The modelling considered different scenarios of climate and groundwater development: Scenario A (historical climate and current development); Scenario C (future climate and current development) and Scenario D (future climate and future development). The future climate scenarios included the wet extreme (wet), the median (mid) and the dry extreme (dry). The raster grids "Ddry.grd", "Dmid.grd" and "Dwet.grd" show predicted hydraulic head for the year 2070 based on projections of future climate and future development. The grids "Ddry-Base.grd", "Dmid-Base.grd" and "Dwet-Base.grd" represent predicted differences between the hydraulic heads produced by Scenario D at 2070, and the modelled spatial distributions of hydraulic head for the year 2010 (Base scenario). The grid "Dmid-Cmid.grd" represents the difference between the 2070 spatial distributions of hydraulic head that were produced by Scenario D (mid) and Scenario C (mid) 'No data' value is 1e30 Cell size is 5000m x 5000m This data and metadata were produced by CSIRO for the Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. For more information, please refer to Welsh WD, Moore CR, Turnadge CJ, Smith AJ and Barr TM (2012) "Modelling of climate and groundwater development. A technical report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment ". CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. Projection is Albers equal area conic, with central meridian 143 degrees longitude, standard parallels at -21 and -29 degrees latitude and latitude of projection's origin at -25.

  • These grids represent the potentiometric surface of the Cadna-owie - Hooray Aquifer in the Great Artesian Basin at 20 year intervals from 1900-2010. They were interpolated from GAB water table elevations and from observations of hydraulic head obtained from state groundwater databases. Head measurements were density corrected prior to creation of surfaces. Where there were no temperatures supplied with the head measurement to allow correction, temperature was interpolated from dataset 'Great Artesian Basin groundwater temperature' (Geoscience Australia dataset, Catalogue No. 76929, available from http://www.ga.gov.au).The grid surfaces 1900-1920, ?, 2000-2010 account for the possible effects of geological faults on groundwater flow in the GAB. Grids 1900-1920_nf and 2000-2010_nf are without the influence of regional tectonic faulting. Null values assigned as 1.000000e+30. Grid cell size (X, Y) = 5000 m, 5000 m. This GIS data set and metadata was produced by CSIRO for the Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment and used in figures 7.2, 7.3 and 7.4 of Ransley TR and Smerdon BD (eds) (2012) Hydrostratigraphy, hydrogeology and system conceptualisation of the Great Artesian Basin. A technical report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. Projection is Albers equal area conic, with central meridian 143 degrees longitude, standard parallels at -21 and -29 degrees latitude and latitude of projection's origin at -25. For more information, contact: hris Turnadge Research Projects Officer CSIRO Land and Water Waite Road Urrbrae SA 5064