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  • This report presents groundwater levels results from the East Kimberley groundwater project in the Northern Territory (NT), conducted as part of Exploring for the Future (EFTF), an eight year, $225 million Australian Government funded geoscience data and information acquisition program focused on better understanding the potential mineral, energy and groundwater resources across Australia. The East Kimberley groundwater project is a collaborative study between Geoscience Australia and State and Territory partners. It focuses on groundwater resources in the Keep River Plains of the NT. This report describes a data release of groundwater levels based on measurements collected in monitoring bores during the EFTF project. The full report includes: • A full description of how water levels in metres relative to Australian Height Datum (m AHD; where zero m AHD is an approximation of mean sea level) were calculated from manual dips and electronic data loggers for this project. • A series of tables in Appendix A containing sufficient information for each bore and datalogger file to reproduce the water levels reported in Appendix B and Appendix C. • A series of hydrographs in Appendix B showing how water levels (in m AHD) interpreted from manual dips and datalogger files varied during the EFTF project. • A series of electronic files in Appendix C that include - Data files from dataloggers in CSV file format that can be used with the information contained in this data release to regenerate the water levels shown on hydrographs in Appendix A. - Data files in CSV file format reporting the final water levels used to generate the hydrographs in Appendix B.

  • Modelled groundwater levels from 2010 to 2070 used to estimate the impact of climate change and future groundwater resource development on groundwater levels in the Cape York area of the GAB. The modelling considered different scenarios of climate and groundwater development: Scenario A (historical climate and current development); Scenario C (future climate and current development) and Scenario D (future climate and future development). The future climate scenarios included the wet extreme (wet), the median (mid) and the dry extreme (dry). This data set contains spatial data that were created from the outputs from climate change scenario models using on the Cape York groundwater flow model. The subfolder "heads" contains various raster grid representations of spatial distributions of hydraulic head for the year 2070 that were output by the respective climate change scenario model, based on projections of future climate. For each climate change scenario there are three outputs: one for each modelled aquifer thickness (100, 150 and 200metres). The folder "differences" contains various raster grid representations of differences between the spatial distributions of hydraulic head that were output by climate change scenario models and by either (a) the respective "A scenario" model or (b) the respective "Base scenario" model (the modelled hydraulic head for the year 2010.) 'No data' value is 1e30 for heads rasters, -9999 for differences rasters Cell size is 5000 m x 5000 m This data and metadata were produced by CSIRO for the Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. For more information, please refer to Welsh WD, Moore CR, Turnadge CJ, Smith AJ and Barr TM (2012), "Modelling of climate and groundwater development. A technical report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment ". CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. Projection is Albers equal area conic, with central meridian 143 degrees longitude, standard parallels at -21 and -29 degrees latitude and latitude of projection's origin at -25.

  • Thickness of the basal Jurassic-Cretaceous sandstone aquifers in the Carpentaria and Laura basins. Data is available as isopachs and raster. Isopachs are in Shapefile format. Rasters are in both ESRI grid and ASCII grid formats. This GIS data set was produced for the Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment and used in: Figure 2.12 of Ransley TR and Smerdon BD (eds) (2012) Hydrostratigraphy, hydrogeology and system conceptualisation of the Great Artesian Basin. A technical report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. Figure 5.8 of Smerdon BD, Welsh WD and Ransley TR (eds) (2012) Water resource assessment for the Carpentaria region. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. This dataset and associated metadata can be obtained from www.ga.gov.au, using catalogue number 76536. LINEAGE (continued from Lineage field) ------------------------------------------------------ REFERENCES (continued) Meyers, N. A. (1969). Carpentaria Basin. GSQ Report 34. Queensland, Geological Survey of Queensland. Mines Administration Pty Ltd. (1962). Cabot-Blueberry Marina No. 1, Authority to Prospect 61P, Queensland. Well Completion report. Report Q/61P/112. Company report 976. Brisbane, Geological Survey of Queensland. Perryman, J. C. (1964). Midwood Exploratory Proprietary Ltd., Completion report, Burketown No.1, A-P 91P, Queensland. Company Report 1480. Brisbane, Geological Survey of Queensland. Smart J, Grimes KG, Doutch HF and Pinchin J (1980) The Carpentaria and Karumba Basins, north Queensland. Bulletin 202. Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics, Australia. Williams, L. J. (1976). GSQ Ebagoola 1 - Preliminary lithologic and composite log. Record 1988/14. Brisbane, Queensland Department of Mines and Geological Survey of Queensland. Williams, L. J. and L. M. Gunther (1989). GSQ Dobbyn 1 - Preliminary lithologic and composite log. Record 1989/22. Brisbane, Geological Survey of Queensland. METHOD: Data was imported into ArcGIS as point sets. The isopach value field was used to interpolate a surface using the Topo to Raster tool in the Spatial analyst toolset. Isopachs were generated from the raster using the Contour tool in the 3d analyst toolset in ArcGIS. The raster and isopachs were clipped to a boundary created from : 1. Gilbert River Formation and equivalents sourced from inset C of Plate 2 The Geology of the Carpentaria and Karumba Basins Queensland 1980 which is part of the Carpentaria and Karumba Basins, North Queensland Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics Bulletin 202. J.Smart, K.G.Grimes, H.F.Doutch & J.Pinchin. ISBN 0642046182 2. Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment project boundary.

  • This report presents groundwater levels results from the Upper Burdekin Groundwater Project in North Queensland, conducted as part of Exploring for the Future (EFTF)—an eight year, $225 million Australian Government funded geoscience data and information acquisition program focused on better understanding the potential mineral, energy and groundwater resources across Australia. The Upper Burdekin Groundwater Project is a collaborative study between Geoscience Australia and the Queensland Government. It focuses on basalt groundwater resources in two geographically separate areas: the Nulla Basalt Province (NBP) in the south and the McBride Basalt Province (MBP) in the north. This report describes a data release of water levels measured in monitoring bores in both provinces by Geoscience Australia during the EFTF project. It includes: - A full description of how water levels in metres relative to Australian Height Datum (m AHD; where zero m AHD is an approximation of mean sea level) were calculated from manual dips and electronic dataloggers for this project. - A series of tables in Appendix A containing sufficient information for each bore and datalogger file to reproduce the water levels reported in Appendix B and Appendix C. - A series of hydrographs in Appendix B showing how water levels (in m AHD) interpreted from manual dips and datalogger files varied during the EFTF project. - A series of electronic files in Appendix C that include (i) Data files from dataloggers in CSV file format that can be used with the information contained in this data release to regenerate the water levels shown on hydrographs in Appendix B, and (ii) Data files in CSV file format reporting the final water levels used to generate the hydrographs in Appendix B. This data release report does not include hydrograph interpretation, which is undertaken in detail in: Cook, S. B. & Ransley, T. R., 2020. Exploring for the Future—Groundwater level interpretations for the McBride and Nulla basalt provinces: Upper Burdekin region, North Queensland. Geoscience Australia, Canberra, http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/135439.

  • This technical report details the methods and results the drilling programs of the Upper Burdekin Groundwater Project conducted as part of Exploring for the Future (EFTF)—an eight year, $225 million Australian Government funded geoscience data and information acquisition program focused on better understanding the potential mineral, energy and groundwater resources across Australia. This report was written by Queensland Government collaborators in the Department of Environment and Science, and is published here as supplied to Geoscience Australia at the conclusion of the project. The drilling program itself was conducted by the Department of Environment and Science as part of the Upper Burdekin Groundwater Project. A total of 17 holes were drilled in 2017-18 at 13 sites with a total combined depth of 943.2 metres. These comprise selected locations across both the Nulla Basalt Province and McBride Basalt Province. A network of 15 monitoring bores were constructed with two test holes backfilled and decommissioned.

  • A SkyTEM airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey was flown during the period 09 to 24 August 2017 in the Daly River Region, Northern Territory, Australia. The area is located in the 1:250000 map sheets, SD52-08 (Pine Creek), SD52-12 (Fergusson River), SD52-16 (Delamere), SD53-09 (Katherine) and SD53-13 (Larrimah) south-southeast of the city of Darwin. Approximately 3379 line kilometres of TEM and magnetic data were acquired. The projected grid coordinates have been supplied in GDA94 MGA Zone 52. The aim of the survey is to provide geophysical information to support investigations of the regional groundwater system, identify regional groundwater sources and mitigate risk in irrigation development. It will provide data to allow for the modelling of the following at a reconnaissance scale: a) trends in regolith thickness and variability b) variations in bedrock conductivity c) conductivity of key bedrock (lithology related) conductive units under cover d) the groundwater resource potential of the region

  • Great Artesian Basin borehole porosity and permeability data from petroleum exploration wells within the GAB, quality checked by Jim Kellet (Geoscience Australia). Data is available in tabular format as a CSV file (comma delimited) and a Microsoft Excel 2010 file. This data set was produced for the Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment and reported in: Section 5.5 'Hydrogeological properties' of Ransley TR and Smerdon BD (eds) (2012) Hydrostratigraphy, hydrogeology and system conceptualisation of the Great Artesian Basin. A technical report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. Section 5.3 'Hydrology' of Smerdon BD and Ransley TR (eds) (2012) Water resource assessment for the Central Eromanga region. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. Section 5.3 'Hydrology' of Smerdon BD and Ransley TR (eds) (2012) Water resource assessment for the Surat region. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. This dataset and associated metadata can be obtained from www.ga.gov.au, using catalogue number 76562.

  • Location of major structural features of the GAB. Includes major lineaments, faults and fold axis. Compiled from existing published and unpublished data sets (see Lineage for details) Data is available in Shapefile format This GIS data set was produced for the Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment and used in: Figure 2.3 of Ransley TR and Smerdon BD (eds) (2012) Hydrostratigraphy, hydrogeology and system conceptualisation of the Great Artesian Basin. A technical report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. Figure 3.1 of Smerdon BD, Ransley TR, Radke BM and Kellett JR (2012) Water resource assessment for the Great Artesian Basin. A report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia. This dataset and associated metadata can be obtained from www.ga.gov.au, using catalogue number 75834.

  • A SkyTEM airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey was flown over Surat and Galilee regions of Queensland, Australia during July 2017. The Surat-Galilee area was surveyed, with multiple survey sites in Orana, Injune and Galilee. The area is comprised of 1293 line kilometres in Orana, 552 line kilometres in Injune and 2922 line kilometres in Galilee. A total of 4767 line kilometres were flown for this survey. The projected grid coordinates have been supplied in GDA94 MGA Zone 55 for Galilee and Injune and in MGA zone 56 for Orana. The aim of the survey is to provide at a reconnaissance scale: a) trends in regolith thickness and variability b) variations in bedrock conductivity c) conductivity of key bedrock (lithology related) conductive units under cover d) the groundwater resource potential of the region e) palaeovalley systems known to exist in the region.

  • This report presents key results from hydrogeological investigations at Alice Springs, completed as part of Exploring for the Future (EFTF)—an eight year, $225 million Australian Government funded geoscience data and information acquisition program focused on better understanding the potential mineral, energy and groundwater resources across Australia. The Southern Stuart Corridor (SSC) project area within the Northern Territory extends in a north–south corridor from Tennant Creek to Alice Springs, encompassing four water control districts and a number of remote communities. Water allocation planning and agricultural expansion in the SSC is currently limited by a paucity of data and information regarding the volume and extent of groundwater resources and groundwater systems more generally. This includes recharge rates, surface water –groundwater connectivity, and the dependency of ecosystems on groundwater. Outside the proposed agricultural areas, the project includes numerous remote communities where there is a need to secure water supplies. Geoscience Australia, in partnership with the Northern Territory Department of Environment and Natural Resources and the Power and Water Corporation, undertook an extensive program of hydrogeological investigations between 2017 and 2019. Data acquisition included helicopter airborne electromagnetic (AEM) and magnetic data, investigative groundwater bore drilling, ground-based and downhole geophysical data (including nuclear magnetic resonance for mapping water content and induction conductivity/gamma for defining geological formations), and hydrochemistry for characterising groundwater systems. This report investigates the hydrogeology across the Alice Springs focus area, which includes the Roe Creek and proposed Rocky Hill borefields, where five hydrostratigraphic units were mapped based on AEM interpretation and borehole geophysical information. The mapping supports the presence of a syncline, with a gentle parabolic fold axis that plunges westward, and demonstrates that the main Siluro-Devonian Mereenie Sandstone and Ordovician Pacoota Sandstone aquifers are continuous from Roe Creek borefield to the Rocky Hill area. Areas with the highest potential for recharge to the Paleozoic strata are where Roe Creek or the Todd River directly overlie shallow subcrop of the aquifer units. Three potential recharge areas are identified: (1) Roe Creek borefield, (2) a 3 km stretch of Roe Creek immediately west of the proposed Rocky Hill borefield, and (3) the viticulture block to the east of Rocky Hill. Analysis of groundwater chemistry and regional hydrology suggests that the rainfall threshold for recharge of the Paleozoic aquifers is ~125 mm/month, and groundwater isotope data indicate that recharge occurs rapidly. The groundwaters have similar major ion chemistry, reflecting similar geology and suggesting that all of the Paleozoic aquifers in the focus area are connected to some degree. Groundwater extraction at Roe Creek borefield since the 1960s has led to the development of a cone of depression and a groundwater divide, which has gradually moved eastward and is now east of the proposed Rocky Hill borefield. The majority of the groundwater within the focus area is of good quality, with <1000 mg/L total dissolved salts (TDS). The brackish water (7000 mg/L TDS) further to the east of the proposed Rocky Hill borefield warrants further investigation to determine the potential risk of it being captured by the cone of depression following the development of this borefield. This study provides new insight to the hydrogeological understanding of the Alice Springs focus area. Specifically, this investigation demonstrates that the Roe Creek and proposed Rocky Hill borefields, and a nearby viticulture area are all extracting from the same aquifer system. This finding will inform the future management and security of the Alice Springs community water supply. New groundwater resource estimates and a water level monitoring scheme can be developed to support the management of this vital groundwater resource.