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  • The data contained in this service is not authoritative and has not been updated since 2006. This web service contains the legacy data found in the Australian Marine Spatial Information System (AMSIS) between 2006 and 2015, with a currency date of 2006. To honour the original licensing arrangements with the data holders, only the WMS is available. Users will need to contact the agency responsible for the data to check current validity and spatial precision.

  • The National HealthDirect health facilities product contains three databases presenting the spatial locations in point format of Hospitals, General Practitioners (GP) and Pharmacies

  • This service includes well geothermal temperature and location, extracted (from the OZTemp database), and used to create the 'OZTemp Interpreted Temperature at 5km Depth' image of Australia.

  • This web service provides access to the Foundation Rail Infrastructure dataset. This contains the spatial locations and attributes of Railway lines and Railway Station points.

  • As part of the 2018 National Seismic Hazard Assessment (NSHA), we compiled the geographic information system (GIS) dataset to enable end-users to view and interrogate the NSHA18 outputs on a spatially enabled platform. It is intended to ensure the NSHA18 outputs are openly available, discoverable and accessible to both internal and external users. This geospatial product is derived from the dataset generated through the development of the NSHA18 and contains uniform probability hazard maps for a 10% and 2% chance of exceedance in 50 years. These maps are calculated for peak ground acceleration (PGA) and a range of response spectral periods, Sa(T), for T = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 s. Additionally, hazard curves for each ground-motion intensity measure as well as uniform hazard spectra at the nominated exceedance probabilities are calculated for key localities.

  • The sea level service is designed to be used within the Carbon Capture and Storage application for 3D visual representation. It is an elevation service that represents the sea and elevation 0.

  • This service has been created specifically for display in the National Map and the chosen symbology may not suit other mapping applications. These data are best suited to graphical applications. These data may vary greatly in quality depending on the method of capture and digitising specifications in place at the time of capture. The Australian Topographic web map service is seamless national dataset coverage for the whole of Australia. The map portrays detailed graphic representation of features that appear on the Earth's surface. These features include framework and habitation themes, including towns, buildings, and points of interest. The service contains layer scale dependencies.

  • This service provides Australian surface hydrology, including natural and man-made features such as water courses (including directional flow paths), lakes, dams and other water bodies. The information was derived from the Surface Hydrology database, with a nominal scale of 1:250,000. The service contains layer scale dependencies.

  • This web map service delivers geochemical data for samples analysed both for inorganic and organic geochemistry. Analytical data are sourced from Geoscience Australia's Inorganic Geochemistry Database (OZCHEM) and Organic Geochemistry Database (ORGCHEM), respectively. The data are joined on a unique sample number. Inorganic geochemical data cover the majority of the periodic table, with metadata on analytical methods and detection limits. Organic geochemical data include results of pyrolysis, derivative calculated values, and, where available, isotopic composition of carbonates (D13C) and isotopic composition of rock nitrogen (D15N). Further, there are provisions for delivery of isotopic data for kerogen (H, C, N) and oxygen (O) for carbonates. Where available, sample descriptions include stratigraphic unit names and ages, and lithology. Location information includes coordinates of the sampled feature (eg, borehole), coordinates of the sample and sample depth. Interpretation of the combined inorganic and organic geochemistry for organic-rich shales will facilitate comprehensive characterisation of hydrocarbons source rocks and mineral commodities source and trap environments. All are achieved within the frameworks of petroleum and mineral systems analysis. The initial data delivered by this service include 1785 samples from 35 boreholes from 14 geological provinces, including recently released data for 442 samples from the South Nicholson National Drilling Initiative Carrara 1 stratigraphic drill hole (Butcher et al., 2021; Carson et al., 2021). Many sampled boreholes are located within the polygon of the Exploring for the Future Barkly-Isa-Georgetown project. This dataset will be updated periodically as more data become available.

  • The Surface Geology of Australia (2010 edition) is a seamless national coverage of outcrop and surficial geology, compiled for use at or around 1:1 million scale. The data maps outcropping bedrock geology and unconsolidated or poorly consolidated regolith material covering bedrock. Geological units are represented as polygon and line geometries, and are attributed with information regarding stratigraphic nomenclature and parentage, age, lithology, and primary data source. The dataset also contains geological contacts, structural features such as faults and shears, and miscellaneous supporting lines like the boundaries of water and ice bodies. The dataset has been compiled from merging the seven State and Territory 1:1 million scale surface geology datasets released by Geoscience Australia between 2006 and 2008, correcting errors and omissions identified in those datasets, addition of some offshore island territories, and updating stratigraphic attribute information to the best available in 2010 from the <A href="http://www.ga.gov.au/products-services/data-applications/reference-databases/stratigraphic-units.html">Australian Stratigraphic Units Database</A>. The map data were compiled largely from simplifying and edgematching existing 1:250 000 scale geological maps. Where these maps were not current, more recent source maps, ranging in scale from 1:50 000 to 1:1 million were used. In some areas where the only available geological maps were quite old and poorly located, some repositioning of mapping using recent satellite imagery or geophysics was employed.