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  • Geoscience Australia carried out a marine survey on Carnarvon shelf (WA) in 2008 (SOL4769) to map seabed bathymetry and characterise benthic environments through colocated sampling of surface sediments and infauna, observation of benthic habitats using underwater towed video and stills photography, and measurement of ocean tides and wavegenerated currents. Data and samples were acquired using the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) Research Vessel Solander. Bathymetric mapping, sampling and video transects were completed in three survey areas that extended seaward from Ningaloo Reef to the shelf edge, including: Mandu Creek (80 sq km); Point Cloates (281 sq km), and; Gnaraloo (321 sq km). Additional bathymetric mapping (but no sampling or video) was completed between Mandu creek and Point Cloates, covering 277 sq km and north of Mandu Creek, covering 79 sq km. Two oceanographic moorings were deployed in the Point Cloates survey area. The survey also mapped and sampled an area to the northeast of the Muiron Islands covering 52 sq km. cloates_3m is an ArcINFO grid of Point Cloates of Carnarvon Shelf survey area produced from the processed EM3002 bathymetry data using the CARIS HIPS and SIPS software

  • Geoscience Australia carried out marine surveys in Jervis Bay (NSW) in 2007, 2008 and 2009 (GA303, GA305, GA309, GA312) to map seabed bathymetry and characterise benthic environments through colocated sampling of surface sediments (for textural and biogeochemical analysis) and infauna, observation of benthic habitats using underwater towed video and stills photography, and measurement of ocean tides and wavegenerated currents. Data and samples were acquired using the Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) Research Vessel Kimbla. Bathymetric mapping, sampling and tide/wave measurement were concentrated in a 3x5 km survey grid (named Darling Road Grid, DRG) within the southern part of the Jervis Bay, incorporating the bay entrance. Additional sampling and stills photography plus bathymetric mapping along transits was undertaken at representative habitat types outside the DRG. darlingrd_1m is an ArcGIS layer of the backscatter grid of the Darling Road survey area produced from the processed EM3002 and EM3002D backscatter data of the survey area using the CMST-GA MB Process

  • This dataset has been digitised from the 1:25000 vegetation map of Christmas Island (accompanying Mitchells 1985 report). The vector version was completed on behalf of Parks Australia Christmas Island. Geoscience Australia used ArcInfo to heads-up digitise a scanned version of the map. Once digitised the arcs were built into polygons and the map was attributed based on the Geoscience Australia data dictionary guidelines. All information relating to vegetation boundaries was extracted from the map and incorporated in the table. The fields that were used follow: Alias Type Width Decimal -----------------------------------------------Shape FIELD_SHAPEPOLY 80Ufi FIELD_DECIMAL 6 0 - unique numberArea FIELD_DECIMAL 18 5Perimeter FIELD_DECIMAL 18 5Code FIELD_CHAR 80 0 - Vegetation unit (map symbol)Descript FIELD_CHAR 64 0 - Description of unitCategories FIELD_CHAR 50 0 - vegetation categoriesFeature FIELD_CHAR 12 0 - (GA field)Plotrank FIELD_DECIMAL 1 0 - (GA field)

  • This is the positional data of AGSO's offshore seismic surveys that fall into the area of the project. The line locations for these seismic surveys are from AGSO's Mardat Database. The surveys have been 'clipped' to the project polygon. There are 9 surveys in the one file, they are: 100r97, 116, 119, 130, 163VTT, 165VTT, 165YST, 175BBHR and 98r Each survey has a number of lines attached to them. There is only one vector file: agso_seismic.shp - Line data

  • This dataset represents the path of the SPOT satellite.

  • These colour and greyscale images are digital pictorial representations of a grid of onshore Bouguer Anomaly station values (Bouguer density of 2.67 t/m3) and offshore free air pseudo gravity station values extracted from the World Gravity Image (Sandwell and Smith, 1995). The onshore gravity observations are held in the Australian National Gravity Database (1997). These images contain wavelengths as small as 5000 m. Gravity digital data are available in point located form or as a grid for the Australian continent as a whole or for smaller areas.

  • The 1:250 000 maps show the type and distribution of 51 regolith-landform units with unique dominant regolith-landform associations, and are a subset of the 205 mapping units on the six 1:100 000 maps. These units are distinct patterns of recurring landform elements with characteristic regolith associations. Geomorphic symbols indicate the location and type of geomorphic activity. The maps present a systematic analysis and interpretation of 1:89 000 scale 1973 RC9 aerial photography, 1:100 000 scale topographic maps (AUSLIG), and field mapping data. High resolution (250m line spacing) airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and magnetics (Geoterrex) were used where applicable

  • The ANCA directory contains two scanned images, geology.tif and veg.tif. The geology map contains the following information: Base map compiled from topographic base sheets prepared by Australian Aerial Mapping Pty. Ltd. and supplied by The British Phosphate Commissioners. Geology and compilation by J. Barrie 1965-66 Drawn by J. Kopros Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics CHRISTMAS ISLAND SURVEY 1965-66. To accompany Record 1967/37. The vegetation map contains the following message: Vegetation map - Accompanies Mitchells 1985 Report. ONLY COPY!! See File 80/13 for Report. It is based on J Barries geology map.

  • This map is designed to show broad regolith-landform units, giving a regional overview of the main regolith types and their associated landforms.Included are the author's detailed Explanatory Notes to the map.

  • Geoscience Australia undertakes classification of biophysical datasets to create seabed habitat maps (termed 'seascapes') for the Australian margin and adjacent sea floor. Seascapes describe a layer of ecologically meaningful biophysical properties that spatially represents potential seabed habitats. Each seascape area corresponds to a region of the seabed that contains similar biophysical properties and, by association, potential habitats and communities. The lack of available standardised biological data at the national scale precludes the integration of biological information into the derivation of national seascapes. By focusing on a much smaller scale over tens of kilometres near the Glomar Shoals in Western Australia, referred to as 'local scale', available biological data were integrated into new derivations of seascapes and results compared with seascapes without these data. Using physical data as described in Whiteway et al. 2007 (GA Record 2007/11) and demersal fish data obtained from the 1967 Russian Berg-3 survey, we have derived four new local sets of seascape to compare the effects of integrating biological data: 1) Standard seascapes using only physical data, 2) Seascapes with an additional biology layer based on the Shannon diversity index, 3) Seascapes with an additional biology layer based on the Simpson diversity index, and 4) Seascapes with an additional layer of randomly-generated data. At the 'regional-scale' we derived two sets of seascapes: 1) Seascapes with an additional biology layer based on the Shannon diversity index that encompasses the entire Berg-3 survey area in northwest Australia, and 2) Standard seascapes using only physical data for the same area. This datsets is the regional scale northwest Australian seascape produced with a biological layer called the 'Shannon Diversity Index'.