From 1 - 10 / 77
  • A short film describing the development of a prototype application for the Oculus Rift DK2 headset, to visualise subsurface geoscience data in situ. Synopsis: Visualisation and Science Promotion team members Michael de Hoog and Bobby Cerini visited Lake George in southern New South Wales, to demonstrate how the Oculus Rift is used to integrate subsurface resources data in situ with views of the landscape. In the opening sequence, Michael and Bobby set off across the dry lake bed. Michael is wearing the Oculus Rift headset while Bobby carries a laptop, containing georeferenced data previously gathered by Geoscience Australia. The headset has a camera attached to capture the view and enable tracking of Michael's head movements. The video shows what Michael is seeing as he looks around. Different data layers are shown being switched on and off, as Michael gazes at different parts of the landscape. The data are overlaid on the precise location within the landscape in which they were collected, including seismic line, volumes, gravity, magnetic and borehole data. The view changes to show Michael at the lakeside, wearing the Oculus Rift headset and looking at the wider landscape. Again the subsurface data is shown. The geographical extent of the data gathered in this area is revealed with Michael's head movements. A voiceover accompanying the movie describes the processes used to make the film and to show what the headset wearer sees. Script: Bobby Cerini, Michael de Hoog Data visualisation, application development: Michael de Hoog Cinematography, editing, audio: Michael O'Rourke Titles: Kath Hagan

  • Video of the geo-heritage aspects of the rocks of Stornes Peninsula, Larsemann Hills

  • A series of short video clips describing how data positions us for the future, consisting of the following titles: How data positions us for the future: Bush fire response A short video showing how the national positioning infrastructure managed by Geoscience Australia underpins the work of hazard management professionals. How data positions us for the future: Precision agriculture A short video showing how the national positioning infrastructure managed by Geoscience Australia underpins the work of the agricultural industry. How data positions us for the future: Urban navigation A short video showing how the national positioning infrastructure managed by Geoscience Australia underpins the everyday life of Australians. Detailed production information: Concept development: Catherine Edwardson, Bobby Cerini, Julie Silec, Michael O'Rourke, Neil Caldwell, Simon. Costello, John Dawson Production management: Bobby Cerini, Julie Silec Video production: Julie Silec, Michael O'Rourke, Neil Caldwell Videography: Bobby Cerini; Rural Fires Service NSW; stock imagery also used

  • Flythrough of the Austrlalian Margin (not including the northern margin) showing detail of the Exmouth Plateau, Perth Canyon, Murray Canyons, NSW Slope and Great Barrier Reef. Gridded bathymetry data shown in this product was sourced from GA and James Cook University.

  • Short video of earthquakes occurring in Victoria during 2013 shown as a time lapse.

  • Short video of earthquakes occurring in New South Wales during 2013 shown as a time lapse.

  • Short video of earthquakes occurring in Western Australia during 2013 shown as a time lapse.

  • Short video of earthquakes occurring in Northern Territory during 2013 shown as a time lapse.

  • Short video of earthquakes above magnitude 3.4 occurring in Australia during 2013 shown as a time lapse.

  • A short film describing the processes of bathymetric mapping and side scan sonar, used to gather data within the search area for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. Synopsis: The film begins with a brief description of Geoscience Australia's role working with the lead agencies in the search process. It explains that existing satellite data is not detailed enough to assist in the search for MH370 and that more detailed bathymetric surveying is required before an underwater search can commence. The film describes how a bathymetric survey is carried out using sonar systems mounted on a ship's hull. It then shows imagery derived from the bathymetric mapping of the search area. The film then shows how a detailed underwater search is carried out, using the bathymetry as a guide. Animation shows how a towed, submersible vehicle gathers more detailed data while travelling slowly at a height of approximately 100 metres above the sea floor. The animation shows how side scan sonar reveals more detailed information about sea floor features. The film ends with a brief summary of the role of the Australian Government agencies involved in the search. Brief credits follow with a copyright statement and publication information. About the data visualisation: This video contains data visualisation and animation sequences. Bathymetry visualisations are derived from data gathered within the MH370 search area. Side scan sonar visualisations are derived from demonstration data only, not gathered within the MH370 search area. Animation sequences showing ship-mounted bathymetry and towed side-scan sonar are representations only and not to scale. Film production credits: Geoscience Australia Script, Direction: Bobby Cerini, Melinda Holland Edit, Cinematography, Sound: Michael O'Rourke Production Management: Bobby Cerini, Neil Caldwell 3D Data Visualisation, Animation: Neil Caldwell, Michael de Hoog Graphics: Kath Hagan Scientific Advice: Stuart Minchin, Anna Potter, Maggie Tran, Tanya Whiteway, Kim Picard Additional credits: Voiceover: Media Sound Studios Music: 'Namaste' by Jason Shaw, 2013 Animation of Globe: 'Earth in Cycles' by Adriano, 2012 3D Data Visualisation and Animation (ship, bathymetry, side scan, ocean features): Eye Candy Animation Producer: Damian Stocks Creative Director: Rachael Johnson Studio Manager: Jess Burrows Lead Artist: Artur Piwko 3D Artist: Kynan Stevenson