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  • The main part of this map is a Hue-Saturation-Intensity (HSI) image of De-trended Global Isostatic Residual Gravity data (DGIR) based on the B Series of the 2019 Australian National Gravity Grids. This series of grids represent the combination of 1.4 million ground gravity observations stored in the Australian National Gravity Database (ANGD) as of September 2019; 345,000 line km of Airborne Gravity and 106,000 line km of gravity gradiometry data in the National Australian Geophysical Database (NAGD), and the Global Gravity Grid developed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego using data from the United States SIO, NOAA and NGA. The ground and airborne gravity data have been acquired by the Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments, the mining and exploration industry, universities and research organisations from the 1940’s to the present day. The shading of the image is from the northwest and the colour scale is linear from -500 µm.s-2 (blue) to +500 µm.s-2 (red).

  • Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data may be used to estimate physical properties such as water content, NMR relaxation time, and porosity of formations penetrated by boreholes. These data were acquired as part of the Exploring for the Future (EFTF) program at field sites within the East Kimberley and Southern Stuart Corridor field areas.

  • The GEOPHYS_SURV database describes geophysical surveys (air, land, and marine), the datasets derived from those surveys, and the methods used for delivery of those datasets. The database includes metadata for all surveys conducted or managed by Geoscience Australia and its predecessor agencies, as well as data and surveys from State and Territory geological survey agencies.

  • Marine seismic surveys are a fundamental tool for geological mapping, including the exploration for offshore oil and gas resources, but the sound generated during these surveys is an acute source of noise in the marine environment. Growing concern and increasing scientific evidence about the potential impacts of underwater noise associated with marine seismic surveys presents an interdisciplinary challenge to multiple sectors including government, industries, scientists and environmental managers. To inform this issue, Geoscience Australia, in collaboration with Curtin University and CSIRO, published a literature review (Carroll et al. 2017) that summarised 70 peer-reviewed scientific studies that investigated the impacts of impulsive low-frequency sound on marine fish and invertebrates. Here we provide an updated, critical synthesis of recently published data to ensure that the Australian governments’ understanding of the potential impacts of seismic surveys on fisheries and the broader marine environment remains current. A significant body of scientific research into the effects of marine seismic sounds on the marine environment has been undertaken over the past four years and scientific knowledge in this area is continuing to improve. This is partly due to increased sophistication of experimental designs that integrate the controlled aspects of laboratory studies, with field-based (before-after-control-impact) studies. However, there remain several research issues and challenges associated with progressing our understanding of the full impact of marine seismic surveys on fisheries and the marine environment. These include the need to broaden the research to cover a wider range of marine species, and to expand our understanding to impacts at the population and ecosystem scale, rather than the individual organism. There is also a continued need for improved standardisation in terminology and measurement of sound exposure. To address the research gaps and issues, Geoscience Australia recommends measures including: 1) undertaking additional multidisciplinary co-designed scientific research to examine short and long term impacts on important life stages of key species (including protected and commercially important species); 2) gathering robust environmental baselines and time-series data to account for spatiotemporal variability in the marine environment and to help inform management and monitoring; 3) continuing to develop and refine standards for quantifying sound exposure; 4) modelling population and ecosystem consequences, and; 5) further studying the interaction of seismic signals with other stressors to better assess cumulative impacts. If applied these recommendations may advance the scientific evidence-base to better inform stakeholder engagement, environmental impact assessment and management of the potential impacts of seismic surveys on fisheries and the marine environment.

  • This package contains Airborne Electromagnetic (AEM) data from the regional survey flown over the Great Artesian Basin intake beds in Queensland, Australia in May-June 2021. A total of 4,612.3 line km of transient EM and magnetic data were acquired. The projected grid coordinates have been supplied in GD2020 / MGA Zone 55. The aim of the survey is to provide geophysical information to support investigations of the regional groundwater system and to better understand the architecture of the aquifers within the upper few hundred metres of the GAB intake beds. It will provide data to allow for the study of the following at a reconnaissance scale: a) trends in regolith thickness and variability b) variations in bedrock conductivity c) conductivity of key bedrock (lithology related) conductive units under cover d) the groundwater resource potential of the region Geoscience Australia (GA) flew the survey as part of the Great Artesian Basin (GAB) Project. The Australian Government, through the National Water Infrastructure Fund – Expansion, commissioned GA to undertake the GAB project. The project is led by GA, in collaboration with the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment; Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications; the Bureau of Meteorology; and state and territory government water agencies across Queensland, South Australia, New South Wales and the Northern Territory.

  • <p>Eight hundred and seventy two km of gravity and deep crustal reflection data were collected for the Kidson Sub-Basin 2D seismic survey along a single transect: 18GA-KB1 during June to August 2018. <p>The purpose of the survey was to image basin and basement structures of the Kidson Sub-Basin of the onshore Canning Basin, and extending across the Paterson Orogen and on to the eastern margin of the Pilbara Craton. <p>The new data will help geological interpretations to determine the stratigraphy, lateral extent and stratigraphic relationships of the basin and adjoining terranes, and an assessment of the region for its oil and gas and mineral potential. <p>The project is a collaboration between Geoscience Australia (GA) and the Geological Survey of Western Australia (GSWA) and was funded by the Australian Government's Exploring for the Future program and the Western Australian Government's Exploration Incentive Scheme (EIS). <p>Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 128284

  • In association with the OB2020 seismic survey, over 8,200 line kilometre of gravity and magnetic data were acquired. These data were subsequently merged with existing satellite data to produce merged grids at 1000m grid cell size. Several enhancement processing techniques were applied to these magnetic and gravity data to better highlight buried features within the Otway Basin. The merged input data from the survey and the enhanced products in this release provide valuable information on the geometry and spatial extent of igneous rocks in the deep-water basin. The distribution of these rocks is critical to the understanding of the petroleum systems and therefore the hydrocarbon prospectivity of the area. This data package contains: 1) A metadata statement document 2) Shapefiles of the magnetic and gravity line data from the OBSP survey 3) ASCII xyz grids of the OBSP and merged grids with public domain data 4) Georeferenced (GeoTIFF) images of the survey and merged grids 5) Gravity and Magnetic data processing reports from the OBSP survey

  • The AusAEM1 airborne electromagnetic survey extends across an area exceeding 1.1 million km2 over Queensland and the Northern Territory. Approximately 60,000 line kilometres of data were acquired at a nominal line spacing of 20 km (Ley-Cooper et al., 2020). To improve targeting and outcomes for mineral, energy and groundwater exploration, we conducted a regional interpretation of this dataset to characterise the subsurface geology of northern Australia. The interpretation includes the depth to chronostratigraphic surfaces, compilation of stratigraphic relationship information, and delineation of structural and electrically conductive features. In addition to help connecting correlative outcropping units separated by up to hundreds of kilometres, the results led to 3D mapping of palaeovalleys and prompted further investigation of electrical conductors and their relationship to structural features and mineralisation. Approximately 200,000 regional depth point measurements, each attributed with detailed geological information, are an important step towards a national geological framework, and offer a regional context for more detailed, smaller-scale AEM surveys. Refer to Wong et al., (2020) for more details on the AusAEM1 interpretation.

  • <p>Exploring for the Future (EFTF, <a href="http://www.ga.gov.au/eftf">http://www.ga.gov.au/eftf</a>) is a four-year (2016–2020) $100.5 million program investigating the mineral, energy and groundwater resource potential in northern Australia and parts of South Australia. The program is delivering new geoscience data, knowledge and decision support tools that support increased industry investment and sustainable economic development. <p>Geoscience Australia commissioned ACIL Allen Consulting to independently quantify the return on investment from selected EFTF projects that are representative of the nature of the work done under the program. The objective was to develop a plausible and economically robust estimate of the returns to government through increased government revenue as a result of the case study projects. Geoscience Australia would like to acknowledge the organisations that have contributed to or supported these EFTF case study projects. <p>The results of this independent analysis can be used to estimate the impact and value of the EFTF program as a whole relative to the funds invested in these activities. The evaluation framework used by ACIL Allen Consulting to assess the impact and value of Geoscience Australia’s pre-competitive geoscience under EFTF is one that has been used for similar assessments of similar organisations in the past. <p>The analysis shows that the benefits that could potentially flow to the Commonwealth as a result of the EFTF projects examined at least match what has been spent on the program, and the returns can be as much as an order of magnitude higher than the cost of the entire program.

  • This data collection is comprised of radiometric (gamma-ray spectrometric) surveys acquired across Australia by Commonwealth, State and Northern Territory governments and the private sector with project management and quality control undertaken by Geoscience Australia. The radiometric method measures naturally occurring radioactivity arising from gamma-rays. In particular, the method is able to identify the presence of the radioactive isotopes potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The measured radioactivity is then converted into concentrations of the radioelements K, U and Th in the ground. Radiometric surveys have a limited ability to see into the subsurface with the measured radioactivity originating from top few centimetres of the ground. These surveys are primarily used as a geological mapping tool as changes in rock and soil type are often accompanied by changes in the concentrations of the radioactive isotopes of K, U and Th. The method is also capable of directly detecting mineral deposits. For example, K alteration can be detected using the radiometric method and is often associated with hydrothermal ore deposits. Similarly, the method is also used for U and Th exploration, heat flow studies, and environmental mapping purposes such as characterising surface drainage features. The instrument used in radiometric surveys is a gamma-ray spectrometer. This instrument measures the number of radioactive emissions (measured in counts per second) and their energies (measured in electron volts (eV)). Radiometric data are simultaneously acquired with magnetic data during airborne surveys and are a non-invasive method for investigating near-surface geology and regolith. <b>To view catalogue records associated with this collection click on the keyword HVC_144636 below.</b>