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  • In 2008, as part of the Australian Government's Onshore Energy Security Program, Geoscience Australia, acquired deep seismic reflection, wide-angle refraction, magnetotelluric (MT) and gravity data along a 250 km east-west transect that crosses several tectonic domain boundaries in the Gawler Craton and also the western boundary of the South Australian Heat Flow Anomaly (SAHFA). Geophysical datasets provide information on the crustal architecture and evolution of this part of the Archean-Proterozoic Gawler Craton. The wide-angle refraction and MT surveys were designed to supplement deep seismic reflection data, with velocity information for the upper crust, and electrical conductivity distribution from surface to the upper mantle. The seismic image of the crust from reflection data shows variable reflectivity along the line. The upper 2 s of data imaged nonreflective crust; the middle to lower part of the crust is more reflective, with strong, east-dipping reflections in the central part of the section.The 2D velocity model derived from wide-angle data shows velocity variations in the upper crust and can be constrained down to a depth of 12 km. The model consists of three layers overlying basement. The mid-crustal basement interpreted from the reflection data, at 6 km in depth in the western part of the transect and shallowing to 1 km depth in the east, is consistent with the velocity model derived from wide-angle and gravity data. MT modelling shows a relatively resistive deep crust across most of the transect, with more conductive crust at the western end, and near the centre. The enhanced conductivity in the central part of the profile is associated with a zone of high reflectivity in the seismic image. Joined interpretation of seismic data supplemented by MT, gravity and geological data improve geological understanding of this region.

  • <p>Geoscience Australia conducted a seismic survey to discover ore bodies in the Broken Hill region in 1996. Seventy eight artefact locations were recorded during the survey, none of which will be impacted upon by the seismic line route which was realigned to avoid them.<p><b>Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 74886</b>

  • The Bureau of Mineral Resources made three seismic surveys in the Ngalia Basin, Northern Territory, during 1967 to 1969 as part of a comprehensive geological and geophysical investigation of the structure and stratigraphy of the basin. L084 is the second survey done in 1968. The project was aimed at delineating the configuration of the basin, within which outcrops are sparse, and providing information pertaining to its depositional and tectonic history. Investigation of the extent of Lower Palaeozoic sedimentation was considered to be important in assessment of the petroleum prospects of the basin. Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 75659

  • Various aspects of isostasy concept are intimately linked to estimation of the elastic thickness of lithosphere, amplitude of mantle-driven vertical surface motions, basin uplift and subsidence. Common assumptions about isostasy are not always justified by existing data. For example, refraction seismic data provide essential constraints to estimation of isostasy, but are rarely analysed in that respect. Average seismic velocity, which is an integral characteristic of the crust to any given depth, can be calculated from initial refraction velocity models of the crust. Geoscience Australia has 566 full crust models derived from the interpretation of such data in its database as of January 2012. Average velocity through velocity/density regression translates into average density of the crust, and then into crustal column weight to any given depth. If average velocity isolines become horizontal at some depth, this may be an indication of balanced mass distribution (i.e., isostasy) in the crust to that depth. For example, average velocity distribution calculated for a very deep Petrel sedimentary basin on the Australian NW Margin shows no sign of velocity isolines flattening with depth all the way down to at least 15 km below the deepest Moho. Similar estimates for the Mount Isa region lead to opposite conclusions with balancing of average seismic velocities achieved above the Moho. Here, we investigate average seismic velocity distribution for the whole Australian continent and its margins, uncertainties of its translation into estimates of isostasy, and the possible explanations for misbalances in isostatic equilibrium of the Australian crust.

  • This report contains the results of a seismic survey on the Nerrima Dome, a major structure within the Fitzroy Basin and near its south-western boundary. The dome is situated near the Fitzroy River about 100 miles south-east of Derby in the West Kimberley district of Western Australia. The Nerrima Dome has been mapped at the surface in Permian sediments and is a complex structure. It was desired to determine if the dome existed at depth and, if not, the structure at depth, with a view to locating a site for a deep drilling test. The target beds for such a test are Devonian and/or Ordovician sediments over which the Permian sediments are believed to lie unconformably. Reflection methods were tried and proved unsuccessful and the survey was carried out using refraction methods. Although the structure underlying the dome has not been clearly shown, the refraction method has indicated that it is complex and does not conform with the domal structure at the surface. There appears to be a major unconformity at comparatively shallow depth (2000 ft). The deep structure (7000 ft) although apparently less complex than that immediately below the unconformity, also bears no obvious relation to structure at surface. The results so far obtained are reasonably conclusive in showing that no simple dome-like structure of large magnitude exists under the Nerrima Dome.

  • The geophysical survey described in this report was undertaken at the request of the Snowy Mountains Authority for the purpose of investigating possible sites for the proposed Spencer's Creek dam. The area surveyed is about two miles above the junction of Spencer's Creek with the Snowy River, about six miles east of the summit of Mt. Kosciuszko, and at an average elevation of about 5,700 feet above sea level. The specific information sought by the survey comprised the following: depth and nature of the bedrock, contours of the bedrock surface, nature of the overburden, and in particular, variations in physical properties occurring either horizontally or vertically. The seismic refraction method was used in the survey. This report gives an account of the geophysical survey and its results.

  • Details and results are given of a seismic refraction survey made at the request of the Hydro-Electric Commission of Tasmania, to investigate the site of the western portal of the proposed Mossy Marsh Tunnel. The tunnel is part of the No. 2 Tarraleah Canal project to transport water from Lake King William to Tarraleah Power Station. The primary object of the survey was to determine the thickness of till overlying the dolerite bedrock, and hence contours of the bedrock surface.

  • At the request of the State Rivers and Water Supply Commission of Victoria, seismic tests using the refraction method were conducted over six well locations near Cobram in the Murray Valley Irrigation District of Central Northern Victoria. The purpose of the tests was to determine whether the depth of the water table in that area could be measured by seismic refraction methods. The problem of rising water tables is one which occurs commonly in irrigation districts. In some areas the problem is purely a local one in which only perched water tables, any within ten feet of the surface, are involved, but it is also possible that the level of the general water table over a large are may be raised by deep percolation. The State Rivers are Water Supply Commission have maintained a check on the water table depth in the Murray River Valley Irrigation District for some time by measurement in existing wells. These wells are not necessarily in the best positions, and some are falling in. The seismic method was considered as an alternative to expensive test boring for ground water measurement.

  • These notes deal with a brief experimental seismic survey undertaken by the Bureau of Mineral Resources for the Victoria Railways. The object of the survey was to determine whether the seismic refraction method was suitable for subsurface exploration in the area between Dynon and Footscray Roads, West Melbourne. The information desired by the Railways was concerned with the existence or otherwise of a "foundation" rock capable of supporting constructions associated with railway sidings and marshalling yards. Records of seismic refractions were obtained along three traverses.

  • Presentation delivered at the Tasman Frontier Workshop, 89- March 2012