From 1 - 10 / 52
  • This report presents the results of seabed mapping and habitat classification surveys completed in Darwin Harbour during 2011 and 2013 as part of the Northern Territory Government's marine habitat mapping program. This research aims to provide baseline data on the existing marine habitats and characteristics of the Darwin Harbour region. It is a collaboration between Geoscience Australia (GA), the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), the Department of Land Resource Management (DLRM) and the Darwin Port Corporation. Key objectives are to: - Produce detailed maps of the bathymetry and derived parameters such as slope and rugosity, - Classify the seabed into areas of hard and soft substrate, and, - Produce seabed habitat maps (or seascapes). Data collection was completed in two stages comprising a multibeam survey, undertaken on the MV Matthew Flinders in 2011 by DLRMs predecessor, the Department of Natural Resources, Environment, the Arts and Sport (NRETAS), GA, AIMS and the Darwin Port Corporation; and, a seabed sampling survey undertaken in 2013 on the MV John Hickman, by DLRM and GA. Data acquired from the surveys included continuous high-resolution multibeam sonar bathymetry and acoustic backscatter, video and still camera observations of seabed habitats and biological communities, and physical samples of seabed sediments. Key outcomes from the surveys include: 1. Improved understanding of the seabed of Darwin Harbour. The main seabed geomorphic features identified in Darwin Harbour include banks, ridges, plains and scarps, and a deep central channel that divides into smaller and shallower channels. Acoustically hard substrates are found mostly on banks and are associated with rocky reef and sponge gardens, and are often overlain by a thin veneer of sandy sediment. In contrast, plains and channels are characterised by acoustically soft substrates and are associated with fine sediments (mud and sand). 2. Classification of physical seabed properties to produce a Seascape Map for Darwin Harbour. Six seascape classes (potential habitats) were derived using an Iterative Self Organising (ISO) unsupervised classification scheme. These six classes are related to statistically unique combinations of seabed substrate, relief, bedform and presence of sediment veneer (quite often inferred from presence of epibenthic biota). The results presented in this report demonstrate the utility of multibeam acoustic data to broadly and objectively characterise the seabed to describe the spatial distribution of key benthic habitats. This is particularly important technique in high-turbidity settings such as Darwin Harbour where the application of satellite and aerial remote sensing techniques can be limited. The results of this study will be used for the planning and analysis of data from upcoming benthic biodiversity studies as they: - Provide robust near-continuous physical variables that can be used to predictive modelling of biodiversity; - Provide high-resolution coverage of near-continuous variables that describe the key physical characteristic of the seabed of the harbour, and; - Enhance survey sample design by providing indicative locations of likely similar biology communities.

  • <p>Geoscience Australia, the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) and the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) conducted a hydrographic surveying and seafloor characterisation survey in nearshore waters offshore from Davis Station in the Australian Antarctic Territory. <p>The multibeam data was acquired during January-February 2017 using two workboats. Geoscience Australia used the AAD workboat Howard Burton and the Royal Australian Navy used their Antarctic Survey Vessel (ASV) Wyatt Earp. The survey is a component of Australian Antarctic Program (AAP) Project 5093 Hydrographic Surveying and Seafloor Characterisation Program (Chief Investigator: Ursula Harris, AAD). <p>The objective of the survey was to map the seabed environment in shallow (<300 m) coastal waters adjacent to Davis station in the Vestfold Hills region, to obtain data for the compilation of nautical charts and to acquire fundamental baseline data necessary for informed environmental management, science, infrastructure and logistical operations. <p>Data collected during the survey includes high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and backscatter data, sediment samples, seafloor imagery and sub-bottom profiles. <p>This dataset comprises a backscatter grid from multibeam sonar data acquired using the AAD workboat Howard Burton, gridded at 2 m spatial resolution, covering a combined area of 90 km2. The Chief Scientist onboard the Howard Burton was Dr. Jodie Smith (Geoscience Australia).

  • This report is the third of three reports that provide the scientific analyses and interpretations resulting from a four-year collaborative habitat mapping program undertaken within the Darwin and Bynoe Harbour region by Geoscience Australia (GA), the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and the Northern Territory Government Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR). This program was made possible through offset funds provided by the INPEX-operated Ichthys LNG Project to DENR, and co-investments from GA and AIMS.

  • This resource includes multibeam sonar backscatter data for Beagle Marine Park (Bass Strait) collected by Geoscience Australia (GA) and the Institute for Marine & Antarctic Studies (University of Tasmania; UTAS) during the period 17 – 26 June 2018 on the RV Bluefin. The survey was undertaken as a collaborative project funded through the National Environmental Science Program Marine Biodiversity Hub, with co-investment by GA and UTAS. The purpose of the project was to build baseline information for benthic habitats in the Beagle Marine Park that will support ongoing environmental monitoring within the South-east Marine Park Network as part of the 10-year management plan (2013-2023). Data acquisition for the project was completed during three separate voyages: Phase 1 - Seabed mapping by multibeam sonar; Phase 2 – Seabed imagery acquisition by Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, and sediment sampling; Phase 3 – Survey of demersal fish communities using Baited Remote Underwater Video (BRUVs). This dataset from Phase 1 comprises 11 backscatter grids derived from multibeam sonar data gridded at 1 m spatial resolution, covering a combined area of 364 km2. A detailed report on the survey is provided in: Falster, G., Monk, J., Carroll, A., Siwabessy, J., Deane, A., Picard, K., Dando, N., Hulls, J., Nichol, S., Barrett, N. 2019. Australian Marine Park Baseline and Monitoring Survey: Post Survey Report, Beagle Marine Park, South-east Marine Park Network. Report to the National Environmental Science Program, Marine Biodiversity Hub.

  • Geoscience Australia carried out a marine survey on Lord Howe Island shelf (NSW) in 2008 (SS06_2008) to map seabed bathymetry and characterise benthic environments through colocated sampling of surface sediments and infauna, rock coring, observation of benthic habitats using underwater towed video, and measurement of ocean tides and wave generated currents. Subbottom profile data was also collected to map sediment thickness and shelf stratigraphy. Data and samples were acquired using the National Facility Research Vessel Southern Surveyor. Bathymetric data from this survey was merged with other preexisting bathymetric data (including LADS) to generate a grid covering 1034 sq km. As part of a separate Geoscience Australia survey in 2007 (TAN0713), an oceanographic mooring was deployed on the northern edge of Lord Howe Island shelf. The mooring was recovered during the 2008 survey following a 6 month deployment. The "2461_ss062008" folder contains raw multibeam backscatter data of the Lord Howe Rise. The raw multibeam backscatter data were collected along survey lines using SIMRAD EM300 from aboard RV Southern Surveyor

  • This resource contains bathymetry and backscatter data for the Oceanic Shoals Commonwealth Marine Reserve (CMR) in the Timor Sea collected by Geoscience Australia during September and October 2012 on RV Solander (survey GA0339/SOL5650). The survey used a Kongsberg EM3002 300 kHz multibeam sonar system mounted in single head configuration to map four areas, covering a combined area of 507 square kilometres. Data are gridded to 2 m spatial resolution. The Oceanic Shoals Commonwealth Marine Reserve survey was undertaken as an activity within the Australian Government's National Environmental Research Program Marine Biodiversity Hub and was the key component of Research Theme 4 - Regional Biodiversity Discovery to Support Marine Bioregional Plans. Hub partners involved in the survey included the Australian Institute of Marine Science, Geoscience Australia, the University of Western Australia, Museum Victoria and the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory. Data acquired during the survey included: multibeam sonar bathymetry and acoustic backscatter; sub-bottom acoustic profiles; physical samples of seabed sediments, infauna and epibenthic biota; towed underwater video and still camera observations of seabed habitats; baited video observations of demersal and pelagic fish, and; oceanographic measurements of the water column from CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth) casts and from deployment of sea surface drifters. Further information on the survey is available in the post-survey report published as Geoscience Australia Record 2013/38 (Nichol et al. 2013).

  • This report provides a description of the activities completed during the Bynoe Harbour Marine Survey, from 3 May and 17 May 2016 on the RV Solander (Survey GA4452/SOL6432). This survey was a collaboration between Geoscience Australia (GA), the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and Department of Land Resource Management (Northern Territory Government) and the second of four surveys in the Darwin Harbour Seabed Habitat Mapping Program. This 4 year program (2014-2018) aims to improve knowledge of the marine environments in the Darwin and Bynoe Harbour regions by collating and collecting baseline information and developing thematic habitat maps that will underpin future marine resource management decisions. The program was made possible through funds provided by the INPEX-led Ichthys LNG Project to Northern Territory Government Department of Land Resource Management, and co-investment from Geoscience Australia and Australian Institute of Marine Science. The specific objectives of the Bynoe Harbour Marine Survey GA4452/SOL6432 were to: 1. Obtain high resolution geophysical (bathymetry) data for the deeper areas of Bynoe Harbour (<5 m), including Port Patterson; and, 2. Characterise substrates (acoustic backscatter properties, sub-bottom profiles, grainsize, sediment chemistry) the deeper areas of Bynoe Harbour (<5 m), including Port Patterson. Data acquired during the survey included: 698 km2 multibeam sonar bathymetry, water column and backscatter; 102 Smith-McIntyre grabs, 104 underwater camera drops, 29 sub-bottom profile lines and 34 sound velocity profiles.

  • The use of multibeam bathymetry, backscatter data and their derivatives together with geophysical data, sediment samples, biological collections and underwater video/still footage to generate seabed habitat maps is an active research interest of Geoscience Australia. The obvious advantage over other techniques is that the multibeam system offers the creation of spatially continuous maps. This report presents the results of an investigation of the potential use of multibeam data (bathymetry, backscatter and their derivatives) to classify/predict the seabed substrate. Principally, the aim was to reliably and repeatedly distinguish hard from soft terrain in Van Diemen Rise of eastern Joseph Bonaparte Gulf using two independent approaches: a classification-based approach and a prediction-based approach.

  • The Australian Maritime Jurisdiction of approximately 7,000,000 km2 has, at most, 25% of its seabed surveyed at high resolution. Since September 2001, under Commonwealth Policy on Spatial Data Access and Pricing, Intergovernmental Committee on Spatial Data Access and Pricing, the co-custodian of the bathymetry data collected within the Australian Marine Jurisdiction has been assigned to Geoscience Australia (GA). GA thus hosts various formats of raw as well as processed bathymetry datasets from multiple sensors, including multibeam sonar systems. The quality between datasets varies, depending on the objectives of the survey. As of January 2013, the multibeam sonar bathymetric coverage held by GA was acquired by 48 vessels, 26 different multibeam sonar systems in 9 different frequencies between 12 and 455 kHz. Consequently, GA has to deal with a variety of survey standards, making the post-processing and merging not efficient. The objective of this document is thus to provide standards and guidance to GA personnel and contractors who conduct multibeam data acquisition and processing during marine surveys to maximise consistency and efficiency. This document provides the most critical steps to multibeam acquisition and a mandatory checklist and deliverables. Specific details and tips for processing using Caris HIPS & SIPS software and Kongsberg EM series data are also provided in the appendix.

  • This report provides a description of the activities completed during the Outer Darwin Harbour Mapping Survey, from 28 May and 23 June 2015 on the RV Solander (Survey GA0351/SOL6187). This survey was a collaboration between Geoscience Australia (GA), the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and Department of Land Resource Management (Northern Territory Government) and the first of four surveys in the Darwin Harbour Seabed Habitat Mapping Program. This 4 year program (2014-2018) aims to improve knowledge of the marine environments in the Darwin and Bynoe Harbour regions by collating and collecting baseline information and developing thematic habitat maps that will underpin future marine resource management decisions. The program was made possible through funds provided by the INPEX-led Ichthys LNG Project to Northern Territory Government Department of Land Resource Management, and co-investment from Geoscience Australia and Australian Institute of Marine Science. The specific objectives of the Outer Darwin Harbour Marine Survey GA0351/SOL6187 were to: 1. Obtain high resolution geophysical (bathymetry) data for outer Darwin Harbour, including Shoal Bay; 2. Characterise substrates (acoustic backscatter properties, grainsize, sediment chemistry) for outer Darwin Harbour, including Shoal Bay; and 3. Collect tidal data for the survey area. Data acquired during the survey included: 720 km2 multibeam sonar bathymetry and acoustic backscatter; 96 sampling stations collecting seabed sediments, underwater photography and video imagery and oceanographic information including tidal data and 54 sound velocity profiles.