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  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric thorium grid has a cell size of 0.001 degrees (approximately 100m) and shows thorium element concentration of the Dubbo Detail NSW 1991, Eucla Basin, SA, 1972/73 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1991 by the NSW, SA Government, and consisted of 63636, 32895 line-kilometres of data at 200, 1500m line spacing and 100, 150m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric potassium grid has a cell size of 0.004 degrees (approximately 420m) and shows potassium element concentration of the NSW Geol Survey, (Inverell, Grafton, Maclean), 1984 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1982 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 23800 line-kilometres of data at 1500m line spacing and 150m terrain clearance.

  • Gravity data measures small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This GSNSW_p200721_Thomson_Gravity_Complete_Bouguer_Gravity_geodetic.nc grid is a complete Bouguer anomaly grid for the Thomson NSW Gravity Survey, 2007 survey. This gravity survey was acquired under the project No. 200721 for the geological survey of NSW. The grid has a cell size of 0.0037 degrees (approximately 380m). A total of 4729 gravity stations were acquired to produce this grid.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric potassium grid has a cell size of 0.000494 degrees (approximately 50m) and shows potassium element concentration of the Batemans Bay-Narooma, NSW, 1998 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1998 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 9000 line-kilometres of data at 250m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of Potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric uranium grid has a cell size of 0.0005 degrees (approximately 50m) and shows uranium element concentration of the NSW DMR, Discovery 2000, 1994-95, AREA C, Bourke survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1995 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 93000 line-kilometres of data at 250m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance.

  • Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This magnetic grid has a cell size of 0.000208 degrees (approximately 20m). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2001 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 30862 line-kilometres of data at 100m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of Potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric uranium grid has a cell size of 0.000629 degrees (approximately 60m) and shows uranium element concentration of the NSW DMR, Discovery 2000, 1994-95, AREA A4, Koonenberry survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1995 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 67000 line-kilometres of data at 250m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance.

  • Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This magnetic grid has a cell size of 0.004 degrees (approximately 420m). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1984 by the NSW, QLD Government, and consisted of 28371 line-kilometres of data at 1500m line spacing and 150m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of Potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric uranium grid has a cell size of 0.00077 degrees (approximately 80m) and shows uranium element concentration of the NSW DMR, Discovery 2000, AREA O, NW EROMANGA, NSW 2000 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2000 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 55000 line-kilometres of data at 200m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance.

  • Gravity data measures small changes in gravity due to changes in the density of rocks beneath the Earth's surface. The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This Southern_Thomson_Gravity_Traverses_P201401_SCBA267GU_FILT.nc grid is a first vertical derivative of the Bouguer anomaly grid for the Southern Thomson Gravity Traverses survey. This LANDsurvey was acquired under the project No. 201401 for the geological survey of NSW, QLD. The grid has a cell size of 0.00095966 degrees (approximately 100m). A total of 3659 gravity stations were acquired to produce the original grid. The Spherical Cap/complete Spherical cap/Bouguer gravity grid was filtered using an algorithm from the INTREPID Geophysics software package to calculate this grid.