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  • A probabilistic tsunami hazard assessement (PTHA) was developed for the island of Tongatapu, All modelled tsunamis were initiated by hypothetical thrust earthquakes on the nearby Kermadec-Tonga subduction zone. We provide raster outputs containing the inundation depth with an estimated 10% and 2% chance of being exceeded in 50 years, as well as the code used to perform the analysis [both available here: https://github.com/GeoscienceAustralia/ptha/tree/master/misc/probabilistic_inundation_tonga2020].

  • University of Newcastle researchers captured media attention in 2017 with the release of a study modelling tsunami risk for the city of Sydney. The study considered a range of scenarios from minor disruptions through to rare, one-in-5000-year disasters. It’s possible the study made headlines in part for the novelty factor. This is not to say Australians are flippant about tsunamis; as a nation, we have grieved the traumatic impact of tsunamis in our region. We just don’t think it will happen to us. However, the science says otherwise. The historical and prehistorical record indicates that tsunamis have affected Australia in the past and could do so again. To Australia’s north and east lie thousands of kilometres of tectonic plate boundaries, where undersea earthquakes could generate tsunamis that reach Australia in a matter of hours. Given half the Australian population lives within 10 kilometres of a coastline – not to mention the scores of interstate and international visitors to our beaches – it’s imperative we take tsunami planning seriously. That’s why the Australian Institute for Disaster Resilience (AIDR) partnered with the Australian Tsunami Advisory Group (ATAG) to revise and refresh national guidance for tsunami emergency planning in Australia. ATAG is the leading national group for tsunami capability development, bringing together the expertise of policymakers, scientists and emergency services practitioners from around Australia. The review produced the Tsunami Emergency Planning in Australia Handbook, an authoritative resource for emergency managers, local and state governments, port authorities and commercial operators in coastal areas. Replacing its 2010 predecessor, Manual 46: Tsunami Emergency Planning in Australia, the handbook was published on 5 November 2018 to mark the United Nations World Tsunami Awareness Day. In clear, accessible language, the handbook outlines the causes and characteristics of tsunamis, separating fact from fiction and highlighting key terms. It introduces planners to both ‘Marine Threat’ and ‘Land Inundation Threat’ – key categories in the tsunami warnings framework – and explores the corresponding planning considerations for coastal communities as well as more transitory ‘maritime’ communities – including fishers, boaters and swimmers. Maritime communities also encompass a range of commercial and government activities, including offshore oil and gas enterprises, military exercises and tourism. The handbook steps users through the responsibilities, processes and warning types that comprise the Australian Tsunami Warning System that was established by the Australian Government after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. ATAG has actively contributed to the management of tsunami risk by promoting research, knowledge management and education. In 2018, ATAG also partnered with AIDR to develop the Tsunami hazard modelling guidelines that represent the most up-to-date view of tsunami hazard nationally. A key companion to the revised handbook, the guidelines present a principles-based approach to developing tsunami hazard information for different purposes; from emergency management to infrastructure development and insurance. The guidelines don’t dictate the use of a particular software; they ask questions to support cooperative approaches between scientists and end users. As for the handbook, stakeholder consultation was key to the development of the Tsunami hazard modelling guidelines. Geoscience Australia, an ATAG member, led the process in partnership with public and private sector representatives and with Commonwealth funding support through Emergency Management Australia. The guidelines emerged from a community-driven development process that engaged different end users and recognised the impact of a range of factors on modelling approaches and decisions (such as the use case and available data). A workshop held in Canberra in 2017 was a key step, bringing together tsunami modelling experts from government, industry and academia. The handbook and companion guidelines are complimented by the Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment from Geoscience Australia. This resource informs local tsunami inundation modelling, which feeds into evacuation planning and community safety. The Tsunami handbook is also supported by Tsunami: The Ultimate Guide – an online learning resource developed collaboratively by ATAG and led by Surf Life Saving Australia. The guide raises tsunami awareness through the education of school-aged children and achieved a highly commended award in the 2014 Resilient Australia Awards. The Tsunami Emergency Planning in Australia Handbook and the suite of companion resources is part of the Australian Disaster Resilience Handbook Collection. The Handbook Collection represents nationally agreed principles on a range of salient disaster resilience themes; supporting organisations across sectors to adopt best-practice approaches aligned to national policy.

  • Tsunamis are relatively rare in Australia and emergency managers rely on the sharing of information at national forums to assist them to manage the tsunami risk in their own jurisdiction. Emergency managers responsible for tsunami risk management across Australia recently identified the need for national consistency in tsunami hazard information and as a result, a project was initiated to develop national guidelines for tsunami hazard modelling. This presentation will outline the approach adopted to develop these guidelines, focusing on the collaboration of end-users and tsunami modelling practitioners. The guidelines were explicitly designed to facilitate appropriate standards of rigour and improved national consistency in tsunami hazard modelling, without dictating software choices or otherwise suppressing innovative practices (which will evolve over time in concert with improvements in tsunami science). The guidelines focused instead on providing guidance in designing a study suitable for the use-case being considered. Core issues included the treatment of uncertainties in tsunami generation, propagation and inundation modelling, and scenario return periods. Whilst the emergency managers proposed the development of these guidelines, the target audience included any agency would could commission tsunami hazard studies for a particular purpose (e.g. coastal infrastructure owners, insurance), as well as the tsunami modellers conducting such studies. The guidelines will also become a valuable resource for the tsunami modelling community. In many situations, tsunami modelling is conducted by coastal hazard modellers who may not have current understanding of Australia’s tsunami hazard.

  • The 2018 Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessmetn (PTHA18) outputs are can be accessed following the README instructions here: https://github.com/GeoscienceAustralia/ptha/tree/master/ptha_access

  • Interactive Maps is a discovery and exploration view of Geoscience Australia's geospatial services. The following scientific and decision support themes have curated content comprised of maps and functions. Each map has queries and functions with linked access to OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) web services and metadata. This system replaces MapConnect and AMSIS applications.

  • In 2018, Geoscience Australia updated and released the Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment (PTHA), which outlines the tsunami hazard for all of Australia and its offshore territories.

  • The service contains the Australian Coastal Geomorphology Landform Subtype Classifications, used to support a national coastal risk assessment. It describes the location and extent of landform subtypes identifiable at scales between 1:25,000 and 1:10,000. It also provides further detail to the Landform Type, with particular reference to feature stability (e.g. dune types) and mobility (e.g. channel types). It is cached service with a Web Mercator Projection.

  • This metadata relates to the ANUGA hydrodynamic modelling results for Busselton, south-west Western Australia. The results consist of inundation extent and peak momentum gridded spatial data for each of the ten modelling scenarios. The scenarios are based on Tropical Cyclone (TC) Alby that impacted Western Australia in 1978 and the combination of TC Alby with a track and time shift, sea-level rise and riverine flood scenarios. The inundation extent defines grid cells that were identified as wet within each of the modelling scenarios. The momentum results define the maximum momentum value recorded for each inundated grid cell within each modelling scenario. Refer to the professional opinion (Coastal inundation modelling for Busselton, Western Australia, under current and future climate) for details of the project.

  • The service contains the Australian Coastal Geomorphology Scale Guide, used to support a national coastal risk assessment. It includes the extents of various reclassified costal mapping products. It is cached service with a Web Mercator Projection.

  • Indonesia is one of the most disaster prone countries in the world due to its hazard profile and high population exposure. Despite its risk profile, disaster management has not traditionally been informed by best available information. Since 2008, the Australian and Indonesian governments have partnered to increase the use of science and technology in Indonesia to support decision making in disaster management. Our partnership has concentrated on strengthening the evidence base for informed disaster management by improving: - hazard information for earthquake, tsunami, volcano and flood - spatial data for exposure (population, building, roads and infrastructure) - decision support tools such as InaSAFE that assist disaster managers to combine hazard and exposure data to inform disaster response and management. We have worked alongside technical and disaster management agencies, universities, non-government organisations and the private sector to develop Indonesian capacity to manage disasters and institutionalise best-practices. Partnerships have facilitated science-to-policy and science-to-programming outcomes in disaster management that help people prepare for, respond to and recover from crises. Ten years is a good time for a partnership to form, blossom and deliver effective and sustainable changes. The achievements over this time are too many to list in entirety. Science and Technology for Disaster Management merely scratches the surface to highlight the most significant achievements. There is a tendency in doing so to focus on achievements over the last three years. In most cases the achievements of this later period of the program have only been possible because they have built on and extended the achievements of the former seven years. Science and Technology for Disaster Management demonstrates how our collaboration has increased the use of science and technology in Indonesian disaster management by developing new knowledge and enhancing capacity, both within the scientists and within policy and decision makers. In doing so, tangible policies have been developed and implemented and practices have changed. The program has helped to strengthen relationships between agencies within Indonesia and also between Indonesia and Australia in the areas of disaster management and science more broadly. New relationships manifest as distinct government-to-government collaborations and strong peer-to-peer links.