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  • Coastal aquifers are vulnerable to seawater intrusion, which is a significant issue in Australia. Geoscience Australia and the Nation Centre of Groundwater Research and Training undertook an assessment of Australia's vulnerability to seawater intrusion. The assessment utilised multiple approaches, including a vulnerability factor analysis; typological analysis; mathematical analysis; qualitative and quantitative analysis; and future land surface inundation and population growth analysis. This is presented as an abstract for the 2013 IAH Congress.

  • The Officer Basin in South Australia and Western Australia is the focus of a regional stratigraphic study being undertaken by the Exploring for the Future (EFTF) program, an Australian Government initiative dedicated to increasing investment in resource exploration in Australia. This data release provides new data and discusses the results from a new commissioned petrographic study of rock samples from five wells of the Officer Basin including: GSWA Vines 1, Yowalga 3, Birksgate 1, Giles 1, and Munta 1. Data includes petrography, XRD, thin section scans and photos, as well as petrographic summaries

  • This abstract is to be submitted for the Great Artesian Basin Coordinating Committee Researcher's Forum on 27th-28th of March 2013, as part of the Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment launch at the event.

  • The Onshore Basin Inventory is a summary of data and geological knowledge of hydrocarbon-prone onshore basins of Australia. Volume 1 of the inventory covers the McArthur, South Nicholson, Georgina, Wiso, Amadeus, Warburton, Cooper and Galilee basins. Under the Exploring for the Future (EFTF) program, Geoscience Australia expanded this work to compile the Onshore Basin Inventory volume 2, which covers the Officer, onshore Canning and Perth basins. These reports provide a whole-of-basin inventory of geology, petroleum systems, exploration status and data coverage. Each report also summarises aspects that require further work. The Onshore Basin Inventory has provided scientific and strategic direction for pre-competitive data acquisition under the EFTF energy work program. Here we provide an overview of the Onshore Basin Inventory, with emphasis on its utility in shaping the EFTF energy systems data acquisition and analysis program. <b>Citation:</b> Carr, L.K., Bailey, A.H.E., Palu, T.J. and Henson, P., 2020. Onshore Basin Inventory: building on Geoscience Australia’s pre-competitive work program with Exploring for the Future In: Czarnota, K., Roach, I., Abbott, S., Haynes, M., Kositcin, N., Ray, A. and Slatter, E. (eds.) Exploring for the Future: Extended Abstracts, Geoscience Australia, Canberra, 1–4.

  • <p>The Roebuck Basin and adjoining Beagle Sub-basin are underexplored areas on Australia’s North West Shelf and are undergoing renewed exploration interest since the discovery of oil at Phoenix South 1 and gas at Roc 1, 2 in the Bedout Sub-basin. A well folio of 24 offshore wells across the Beagle, Bedout, Rowley and Barcoo sub-basins was completed as part of Geoscience Australia’s assessment of hydrocarbon prospectivity across the region. The study consists of composite well log plots summarising lithology, stratigraphy, GA’s newly acquired biostratigraphic and geochemical data and petrophysical analysis, in conjunction with revised sequence interpretations. <p>The wells included in the well folio package are: <p>Anhalt 1, Barcoo 1 ST2, Bedout 1, Bruce 1, Cossigny 1, De Grey 1A ST1, Delambre 1, Depuch 1, East Mermaid 1B ST1, Hanover South 1, Huntsman 1, Keraudren 1. Lagrange 1, Minilya 1, Nebo 1, Omar 1, Phoenix 1, Phoenix 2, Phoenix South 1 ST1 ST2, Picard 1, Poissonnier 1, Roc 1, Steel Dragon 1 and Wigmore 1

  • This Karumba Basin dataset contains descriptive attribute information for the areas bounded by the relevant spatial groundwater feature in the associated Hydrogeology Index map. Descriptive topics are grouped into the following themes: Location and administration; Demographics; Physical geography; Surface water; Geology; Hydrogeology; Groundwater; Groundwater management and use; Environment; Land use and industry types; and Scientific stimulus. The Karumba Basin is a shallow geological basin in Queensland, Australia, composed of sedimentary rocks and unconsolidated sediments that cover the Mesozoic Carpentaria Basin. Deposition started during the Late Cretaceous to Early Paleocene and has continued into the Holocene. The basin extends from western Cape York Peninsula into the Gulf of Carpentaria, where it connects with Cenozoic sediment deposits in Papua New Guinea. Although the sediments in both areas share lithostratigraphic and biostratigraphic similarities, their tectonic histories differ. The basin's structural geology is relatively uniform, with a significant downwarp known as the Gilbert-Mitchell Trough in Cape York Peninsula and another depocenter offshore in the Gulf of Carpentaria. The depositional history and stratigraphy of the Karumba Basin can be divided into three cycles of deposition, erosion, weathering, and the formation of stratigraphic units. The earliest cycle (the Bulimba Cycle) began in the Late Cretaceous to Early Paleocene, with episodes of significant uplift along the eastern margins of the basin. This resulted in the deposition of the Bulimba Formation and the Weipa Beds, primarily consisting of claystone, sandstone, conglomerate, and siltstone with minor coal layers. This cycle was followed by a period of planation and deep weathering, creating the Aurukun Surface. The second cycle (the Wyaaba Cycle) was initiated by large-scale earth movements along the Great Dividing Ranges, forming much of the eastern boundary of the Karumba Basin, and leading to the formation of the Wyaaba beds and other equivalent units. These beds consist mainly of fluvial to paralic clay-rich sandstone, conglomerate, siltstone, and claystone. In the south-west, Oligocene to Pliocene limestone deposits also formed in lacustrine settings, and were sourced from and deposited upon the underlying Georgina Basin. The cycle ended with ensuing periods of erosion and weathering and the development of the Pliocene Kendall Surface, as well as widespread basaltic volcanism. The final cycle (the Claraville Cycle) started in the Pliocene and continues to the present. It has experienced several episodes of uplift and deposition controlled by sea level change, climate variability and volcanism in the south. The Claraville beds are unconsolidated sediments, chiefly comprised of clayey quartzose sand and mud with minor gravels, reaching approximately 148 m thickness offshore, and approximately 70 m onshore. As this cycle is still ongoing, no terminal surface has been formed, and most units consist of unconsolidated surficial sediments.

  • This Amadeus Basin dataset contains descriptive attribute information for the areas bounded by the relevant spatial groundwater feature in the associated Hydrogeology Index map. Descriptive topics are grouped into the following themes: Location and administration; Demographics; Physical geography; Surface water; Geology; Hydrogeology; Groundwater; Groundwater management and use; Environment; Land use and industry types; and Scientific stimulus. The Amadeus Basin is a sedimentary basin in central Australia that spans from the Neoproterozoic to Late Devonian, potentially Early Carboniferous, periods. It contains clastic, carbonate, and evaporitic sedimentary rocks, with a total thickness of 6,000 m to 14,000 m. The Neoproterozoic section alone is up to 3,000 m thick and is divided into four super-sequences separated by major unconformities. The basin is an active hydrocarbon province, with ongoing oil and gas production and the potential for further discoveries. Several key petroleum source rock units have been identified in the Amadeus Basin. The Gillen Formation, found in the northeast, consists of marine black shale, dolostone, sandstone, and evaporite, reaching a maximum thickness of 850 m. The Loves Creek Formation comprises deep water grainstone and mudstone overlain by stromatolite-bearing grainstone and dolostone, with a thickness of up to 500 m. The Johnnys Creek Formation is a unit composed of red bed and dolomitic limestone or dolostone, along with siltstone and sandstone, up to 400 m thick. The Inindia beds consist of sandstone, siltstone, chert, jasper, tillite, and dolostone, with a maximum thickness of 2,000 m and were deposited in shallow marine conditions. The Aralka Formation is a siltstone and shale unit with two members, the Ringwood Member and the Limbla Member, reaching a thickness of up to 1,000 m. The Pertatataka Formation is a turbiditic red and green siltstone and shale unit, along with minor feldspathic sandstone, deposited in a deep marine or marine shelf environment, typically about 350 m thick but up to 1,400 m thick at certain locations. The Winnall Group is a succession of sandstone and siltstone, with a maximum thickness of 2,134 m. The Chandler Formation is a poorly exposed unit consisting of halite, foetid carbonate mudstone, shale, and siltstone, deposited in a shallow marine environment, with halite deposits reaching thicknesses of 230 m to 450 m. The Giles Creek Dolostone is a carbonate and siltstone unit, with minor sandstone, deposited in a shallow-marine environment. The Horn Valley Siltstone is a thinly bedded shale and siltstone, with nodular limestone and sandy phosphatic and glauconitic interbeds, serving as the primary hydrocarbon source rock in the basin. Lastly, the Stairway Sandstone is 544 m thick and divided into three subunits, consisting of quartzitic sandstone, black shale, siltstone, mudstone, and phosphorites.

  • The Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment involves a basin-scale investigation of water resources to fill knowledge gaps about the status of water resources in the basin and the potential impacts of climate change and resource development. Citation: Ransley TR and Smerdon BD (eds) (2012) Hydrostratigraphy, hydrogeology and system conceptualisation of the Great Artesian Basin. A technical report to the Australian Government from the CSIRO Great Artesian Basin Water Resource Assessment. CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship, Australia.

  • The South Nicholson Basin and immediate surrounding region are situated between the Paleo- to Mesoproterozoic Mount Isa Province and McArthur Basin. Both the Mount Isa Province and the McArthur Basin are well studied; both regions host major base metal mineral deposits, and contain units prospective for hydrocarbons. In contrast, the South Nicholson Basin contains rocks that are mostly undercover, for which the basin evolution and resource potential are not well understood. To address this knowledge gap, the L210 South Nicholson Seismic Survey was acquired in 2017 in the region between the southern McArthur Basin and the western Mount Isa Province, crossing the South Nicholson Basin and Murphy Province. The primary aim of the survey was to investigate areas with low measured gravity responses (‘gravity lows’) in the region to determine whether they represent thick basin sequences, as is the case for the nearby Beetaloo Sub-basin. Key outcomes of the seismic acquisition and interpretation include (1) expanded extent of the South Nicholson Basin; (2) identification of the Carrara Sub-basin, a new basin element that coincides with a gravity low; (3) linkage between prospective stratigraphy of the Isa Superbasin (Lawn Hill Formation and Riversleigh Siltstone) and the Carrara Sub-basin; and (4) extension of the interpreted extent of the Mount Isa Province into the Northern Territory. <b>Citation:</b> Carr, L.K., Southby, C., Henson, P., Anderson, J.R., Costelloe, R., Jarrett, A.J.M., Carson, C.J., MacFarlane, S.K., Gorton, J., Hutton, L., Troup, A., Williams, B., Khider, K., Bailey, A.H.E. and Fomin, T., 2020. South Nicholson Basin seismic interpretation. In: Czarnota, K., Roach, I., Abbott, S., Haynes, M., Kositcin, N., Ray, A. and Slatter, E. (eds.) Exploring for the Future: Extended Abstracts, Geoscience Australia, Canberra, 1–4.

  • This Murray Basin dataset contains descriptive attribute information for the areas bounded by the relevant spatial groundwater feature in the associated Hydrogeology Index map. Descriptive topics are grouped into the following themes: Location and administration; Demographics; Physical geography; Surface water; Geology; Hydrogeology; Groundwater; Groundwater management and use; Environment; Land use and industry types; and Scientific stimulus. The Murray Basin, a significant sedimentary basin in Australia, displays varying sediment thickness across its expanse, with the thickest layers concentrated in its central regions. The basin's geological evolution is characterised by distinct depositional phases. During the Paleocene to Eocene Renmark Group phase, sedimentary deposits encompass fluvial sands at the base, transitioning into paralic carbonaceous clay and lignite layers. These sediments indicate the shift from riverine to shallow marine environments, dating back to the Paleocene and Eocene periods. The Oligocene to Middle Miocene period encompasses the Ettrick Formation and Murray Group Limestone. The former includes marl, and the latter displays glauconitic grey-green marl and bryozoal limestone, revealing prevailing marine conditions during the Oligocene to Middle Miocene. In the Late Miocene to Early Pliocene Bookpurnong Formation, marine shelly dark grey clay and silt, previously known as the Bookpurnong Beds, coexist with Pliocene fluvial to marginal marine quartz sands (Loxton Sands), marking the transition back to terrestrial and nearshore marine settings. During the Late Pliocene to Pleistocene, the Blanchetown Clay, a substantial unit within Lake Bungunnia, signifies lacustrine phases. Overlying ferricretes in the central/eastern basin and the Norwest Bend Formation's oyster coquinas in the western region, the clay exhibits variable coloration and laminations. Lastly, the Pleistocene to Holocene phase witnesses river-induced reworking and erosion of underlying sediments, giving rise to the Shepparton and Coonambidgal formations. In the western Murray Basin, Cenozoic sedimentary rocks are relatively thin, typically measuring under 200-300 meters. The Renmark Trough area presents a maximum thickness of 600 meters.