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  • Extended review of mineralexploration in Australia in 2010.

  • Large areas of prospective North and North-East Queensland have been surveyed by airborne hyperspectral sensor, HyMap, and airborne geophysics as part of the 'Smart' exploration initiative by the Geological Survey of Queensland. In particular, 25000 km2 of hyperspectral mineral and compositional map products, at 4.5 m spatial resolution, have been generated and made available via the internet. In addition, more than 130 ASTER scenes were processed and merged to produce broad scale mapping of mineral groups (Thomas et al, 2008). Province-scale, accurate maps of mineral abundances and minerals chemistries were generated for North Queensland as a result of a 2 year project starting in July 2006 which involved CSIRO Exploration and Mining, the Geological Survey of Queensland (GSQ), Geoscience Australia, James Cook University, and Curtin University. Airborne radiometric data acquired over the same North Queensland Mt Isa - Cloncurry areas as the hyperspectral surveys, had been acquired at flight line spacing of 200 metre. Such geophysical radiometric data provides a useful opportunity to compare the mineral mapping potential of both techniques, for a wide range of geological and vegetated environments. In this study, examples are described of soil mapping within the Tick Hill area, and geological / exploration mapping within the Mt Henry and Suicide Ridge prospects of North Queensland.

  • Geoscience Australia has been acquiring deep crustal reflection seismic transects throughout Australia since the 1960s. The results of these surveys have motivated major interpretations of important geological regions, contributed to the development of continental-scale geodynamic models, and improved understanding about large-scale controls on mineral systems. Over the past five years, Geoscience Australia has acquired over 6000 km of deep crustal seismic reflection data under the auspices of the Predictive Mineral Discovery Cooperative Research Centre (pmd*CRC), Onshore Energy Security Program (OESP), AuScope Earth Imaging (part of the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy), and all mainland State and Territory governments. These seismic datasets continue to underpin fundamental research into the geodynamics of the Australian continent and provide the third dimension for pre-competitive geoscience information related to mineral and energy resources in selected provinces and basins. Regional seismic reflection surveys currently utilise three Hemi 50 or 60 vibrators at 80 m VP with 40 m group interval, resulting in 75 fold data to 20 s TWT. In-house processing is aimed at providing a whole of crust image, without sacrificing shallow detail. Gravity readings are also collected along the lines at 400 m intervals to assist integrated regional interpretations based on the seismic traverses. Magnetotelluric (MT) soundings, including both broad-band and long period, have been acquired along most traverses. MT provides an image of the conductivity of the crust which is complementary to the structural information obtained from reflection seismic. Geoscience Australia is currently developing an in-house MT processing and modelling capability.

  • The presence of alluvial gold in the river gravels of Mastuj and Chitral has been known for many years, and local inhabitants have realised the value of the gold and have worked the deposits. Tipper (1923), Coulson (1937), Ikramuddin Ali (1951) and Tayyab Ali (1951), have reported on the placers but no accurate determinations have been made of their size or grade. In August, 1951, the Australian Geological Party, J.F. Ivanac, D.M. Traves, and D. King, examined the deposits between Mastuj and Drosh, with the objects of reporting on the size and nature of the placers, and if warranted, to suggest suitable sites for testing. This report gives an account of the examination and its results.

  • This statement sets out the results of drilling in part of the Minmi Area, Newcastle District. The area covered by the drilling grid totals about 390 acres and includes parts of Portion 130, Ph. of Teralba and Portions 15 and 26, Ph. of Hexam. This statement refers to the western and central blocks of the area. Proximate analyses and calorific value determinations of the coal cores were made by the New South Wales Mines Department laboratory in Sydney. The analyses here quoted indicate a composition roughly equivalent to that which might be expected for cleaned or hand-picked coal from this area.

  • The purpose of a visit to the Cloncurry district, which lasted from 21st August to 30th September, 1951, was to see what aid geophysical work could give in the search for copper deposits in this field which is one of the biggest mineral fields in Australia. While the Cloncurry district in the past produced copper from many small but rich deposits, only a few exceeded 200,000 tons, and the search now is being conducted mainly with the idea of finding and developing huge but relatively low grade copper deposits with at least several hundred thousand tons, or perhaps millions of tons of copper ore containing at least 2.5 to 5 percent copper. It is possible that geophysics might help in this search, and consequently, a number of old copper mines were visited and some geophysical test traverses made. With the rather limited facilities available the tests were confined to self-potential measurements and to a few traverses with a new Atlas gravity meter, especially suitable for ore prospecting because of its lights weight and transportability and its high sensitivity and accuracy. This report gives an account of the survey and its results.

  • This report is an annual report which provides information and statistics on Australia's oil and gas resources. The statistics in this report include data for the calendar year 1999.

  • This statement, supplemented by graphic bore logs, sets out the results of a drilling campaign conducted at Cocked Hat Creek immediately west of the village of Young Wallsend, Newcastle district, by the Bureau in accordance with an agreement between the Mines Department of New South Wales, the Joint Coal Board and the Bureau. The area covered by the drilling grids totals about 200 acres, and includes parts of Portions 55, 69, 73 and 79, Parish of Teralba, County of Northumberland. It is known that this area, and a large extension to the north amounting to at least 4 square miles, is underlain by the Australasian seam which had been intersected at 50 feet from the surface in Portion 60 where it is approximately coincident with sea-level. Also the seam is exposed at various points along the northern margin to the larger area at elevations ranging from 170 to 220 feet. The purpose of the drilling was to test the thickness and quality of this seam, hitherto almost unknown factors, and to determine whether a potential open-cut site worthy of more exhaustive investigation exists.

  • The Mosquito Creek Wolfram Field was visited on 6th and 7th October, 1951. This report gives a brief account of the inspection. The general geology of the area, the ore-bearing reefs, and the mining leases inspected, are described.

  • A geophysical survey was made in the Rum Jungle district in October and November, 1950, using self-potential and potential-ratio methods. This investigation formed part of a larger programme of geological and geophysical exploration for uranium minerals. Self-potential surveys were made over three areas, namely, Brown's Copper Mine Area, Intermediate Area, and White's Area. A potential-ratio survey was made over only the first of these. This report gives an account of the geophysical work conducted in each of these areas. The results of the survey are described, and recommendations for future drilling work are given, for each of the surveyed areas respectively.