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  • The dykes which contain the felspar outcrop lie on the western slope of a hill two miles east of Wodonga, and south-southeast from Albury. This report comprises notes on the occurrence of the felspar and descriptions of the individual deposits.

  • Report on permian foraminifera in core samples obtained from bores at Coorabin, 1942-3.

  • The presence of muscovite on Yinnietharra Station in commercial sizes and qualities has been known since 1913, but little active development was carried out in the locality until 1926, when a syndicate, formed in England, took up leases and began operations. Activity lapsed the following year, but desultory prospecting more recently has led to the production of a few small cases of spotted mica, some of which was sold in Melbourne in the early part of 1942. The deposits described hereunder are shown on the accompanying locality map, Plate 1. At this stage only brief references are made to deposits containing stained and spotted mica unsuitable for critical electrical or radio applications.

  • This report is written chiefly to present estimates of reserves of bauxite proved to date in Gippsland. Consequently, discussions of the geological aspects of the investigation, though essential to an understanding of the subject, are kept to a minimum. The existence of bauxite in the neighbourhood of Boolarra and Thorpdale, County Buln Buln, South Gippsland has been known for some years and bauxite from Nahoo, Allot. 8 Ph. Narracan South, has been used for chemical purposes for over 20 years. Eleven additional discoveries were made from time to time up to April, 1942, when an extensive prospecting programme was undertaken. In the short time that has elapsed since then a further twelve deposits have been discovered, making a total of twenty-four deposits in the adjoining parishes of Moe, Allambee East, Narracan South, Mirboo and Budgeree in the county of Buln Buln. Several of these deposits have been systematically tested by shaft sinking and boring. This exploration is still in progress.

  • The Chilcot copper mine is situated 15 miles south-south-west from Orange, from which it may be reached by reasonably good road. It was examined during 1942 by Dr. N.H. Fisher, Chief Geologist, Mineral Resources Survey, who recommended that a geophysical survey be made to search for additional ore shoots along the lode channel (1942/020). The geophysical survey was made during the three weeks ending 19th December. Operations were commenced over the area north-east of the mine, extending a distance of 550 feet from the mine, thus covering the part favoured by Dr. Fisher for extension of the lode channel. Later the survey was extended a similar distance to the south-west and the north-eastern part was extended a further 150 feet. Methods used comprised geomagnetic, spontaneous, polarisation, electro-magnetic and potential ratio. Traverses were placed at 50 feet intervals and observations by the various methods were made at intervals of 25 feet and, in some parts, at closer intervals. The results of this survey are discussed herein.

  • A visit of inspection to the Lakes Entrance Shaft, with the object of making a collection of fossils from the sediments already excavated, was made on the 17th and 18th of December. The list of fossils recognised is fairly comprehensive but for the reasons stated it consists chiefly of small forms obtained by washing down the sandy marls. The approximate depths at which the various palaeontological horizons were encountered in the shaft are given below, the sequence and lithology of the beds being identical with that proved in all bores in the vicinity.

  • This report gives a brief overview of the situation and geological features of the barite deposit.

  • The Moonta-Wallaroo copper field was discovered in 1860 and has been one of the most productive copper fields in Australia. At the time that large scale mining operations ceased in 1923, copper to the value of over £20,000,000 had been produced. At the present time no active mining is in progress and the old mines are closed and the mining plant completely dismantled. There are two main copper producing areas in the field, namely Moonta and Kadina which are 10 miles apart. There are a number of smaller copper areas between and around the main ones. A recent investigation by Mr. S.B. Dickinson of the South Australian Mines Department indicates that while some of the old mines have small known ore reserves, the cost of re-establishing these mines would be too high to warrant such an enterprise. It is probable that all the surface showings of copper have been fully investigated but it is also probable that many lodes exist which show no surface signs. How these lodes are to be discovered is a matter of immediate concern. The present report deals with an extensive survey of parts of the Moonta and Kadina sections of the field. The work was commenced on a large layout pegged to the south-west of Beddome's and Green's lodes on the centre belt of fracturing at Moonta. Following the findings of the test report, the layout was covered by potential ratio and phase surveys and by a self-potential survey. Upon resumption of field work it was decided to use the electromagnetic method in a large scale test on Beddome's layout. Some self-potential and potential ratio work was carried out on the Kadina layouts, but it was found that these methods suffered from the same disability, namely a great number of effects which obviously were due to lode shears, as had been found in the case of Beddome's layout. In this report, the interpretation is based solely on the results of the electromagnetic surveys.

  • This report follows a preliminary report dated 9th September, 1942, and it is not proposed to recapitulate the matter contained therein, although some references to the preliminary report are necessary. The principal purpose of a second visit to the Lakes was to determine accurately the area of useful salt-bearing surface and the nature of the beds. Much evidence confirmatory of the views expressed earlier regarding the structure of the lake beds was noted. However, a plane-table survey revealed that the total extent occupied by recoverable salt is considerably less than a casual inspection would suggest and consists of the following areas, which are shown on the accompanying plan.

  • The mineral resources and mining industry of the Mandated Territory of New Guinea are the subject of this report. Mining operations, production, and geological conditions are discussed. Tables showing the estimated gold and silver production figures for the period 1926-41 are appended.