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  • 1 map showing the Acreage Release Title W15-2 in the area of Overlapping Jurisdiction in the Perth Treaty. Requested by RET August 2014. LOSAMBA register 707

  • Australia is bounded on three sides by passive continental margins, a legacy of Gondwana breakup as first India and then Zealandia, followed by Antarctica, separated from Australia during the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous through to earliest Oligocene. As with most other rifted continental margins, breakup along each of these three margins occurred episodically, controlled by a number of factors including mantle rheology, pre-existing lithospheric and basement structure, and the direction of crustal extension prevailing at any one time during successive stages of continental rifting. Resulting post-rift passive margin geometries are consequently highly segmented and characterised by abrupt changes in orientation along strike that commonly coincide with pre-existing basement structures or crustal-scale heterogeneities across which there is a commensurate change in offshore basin architecture and normal fault patterns. Mapping of these heterogeneities in geological and geophysical datasets combined with a growing realisation that many of these basement features extend all the way to the ocean-continent boundary has focussed attention on the extent to which these same crustal structures may also have influenced the distribution and pattern of ocean floor fracture zone development. A prominent re-entrant along Australia's 4000-km long southern rifted margin marks the site of an early Paleozoic crustal-scale basement structure whose N-S orientation was optimal for reactivation during a switch in the direction of extension from NW-SE to N-S during the closing stages of continental rifting from about 55-47 Ma onward. This structure evolved from a continental transform boundary into the Tasman Fracture Zone with consequent development of a sheared continental margin along the western margin of the South Tasman Rise analogous to that formed off the Ghanaian coast during the separation of Africa from South America. As with its West African counterpart, seismic reflection profiles point to a strong strike-slip influence on basin geometry with en echelon development of elongate, narrow depocentres bounded by discontinuous steep to subvertical faults. Equally spectacular pull-apart basins associated with the 1500km-long Wallaby-Zenith Fracture Zone off Western Australia are similarly developed in thinned continental crust but, unlike the basins associated with the South Tasman Rise, they have been better seismically imaged and contain a substantially greater thickness of sediment (up to 5 seconds TWT). Interpreted seismic sections across the Zeewyck Sub-basin beneath the Valanginian breakup unconformity show a complex network of deep sedimentary basins bounded by steep faults and blocks of elevated older basement (positive flower structures) across which there is only limited lateral continuity in stratigraphy. Sedimentary sequences immediately above the breakup unconformity thicken into the basin axis and exhibit wedge-like geometries consistent with detritus shed from the adjacent basement highs as the sheared continental margin evolved and the associated spreading axis migrated oceanward. A period of basin-wide folding and faulting accompanied by uplift and erosion brought this phase of basin formation to a close and possibly occurred in response to transpression immediately prior to the onset of full drift. Fabrics in the adjacent N-S striking Pinjarra Orogen and related Darling Fault played an important role in localising extensional strain during formation of the Zeewyck Sub-basin and greater Perth Basin.

  • Series of information sheets designed to provide landholders and local community with information regarding the activities being underatken as part of the Southern Thomson pre-competitive geoscience project, run in collaboration with the Queensland and New South Wales State Geological Surveys.

  • The first edition ACE - Australian Continental Elements dataset is a GIS representation of the lithosphere fabrics of the Australian plate, interpreted from linear features and associated discontinuities in the gravity anomaly map of continental Australia (Bacchin et al., 2008; Nakamura et al., 2011) and the global marine gravity dataset compiled from satellite altimetry (Sandwell & Smith, 2009). It should be used in context with these input data sources, at scales no more detailed than the nominal scale of 1:5 000 000.

  • Since the early 2000s Geoscience Australia has been compiling new seamless national continental scale geological maps. The first edition of a seamless 1:1 000 000 scale surface geology map of Australia was released in 2008 [1] and the latest edition released in 2012 [2]. This work draws extensively from available geological mapping in Australia, primarily at the scales of 1:250 000 and 1:100 000 with the addition of some special regional scale maps. The digital GIS dataset is linked to other national geoscience databases at Geoscience Australia, including the Australian Stratigraphic Units Database. In September 2013, Geoscience Australia released the first national Geological Provinces dataset [3]. Geoscience Australia's Geological Provinces Database captures detailed information such as age, stratigraphy, lithology, mineral resources, and relations to other provinces. It also captures outlines of the full (ie, concealed) extent and outcropping extent of a province. As part of Geoscience Australia's contribution to Searching the Deep Earth [4], current continental scale digital geological mapping in Geoscience Australia includes production of a new national bedrock geological map at 1:2 500 000 scale with stratigraphic units information that can be linked with other national geoscience databases, basement geology, and a national regolith landforms coverage. Looking ahead, a goal is to produce seamless, continental scale basement or 'solid' geology maps for a variety of depth/time slices. A recent step towards this goal has been the production of a map of Mesoproterozoic and older basement geology for a large region of central Australia, from the eastern Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia across the Musgrave and southern Arunta Provinces to the Queensland border.

  • 1 map showing the Acreage Release Title AC15-3 in the area of Overlapping Jurisdiction in the Perth Treaty. Requested by RET August 2014. LOSAMBA register 707

  • Tsunami inundation models provide fundamental information about coastal areas that may be inundated in the event of a tsunami. This information has relevance for disaster management activities, including evacuation planning, impact and risk assessment, and coastal engineering. A basic input to tsunami inundation models is a digital elevation model-that is, a model of the shape of the onshore environment. Onshore DEMs vary widely in resolution, accuracy, availability, and cost. Griffin et al. (2012) assessed how the accuracy and resolution of DEMs translate into uncertainties in estimates of tsunami inundation zones. The results showed that simply using the 'best available' elevation data, such as the freely available global SRTM elevation model, without considering data accuracy can lead to dangerously misleading results.

  • Australian Landscapes are prone to fire, from the Northern Savanna to the southern forests of Tasmania. Although fire is natural and is a vital management tool, fires are also a hazard to people and assets across Australia. Sentinel is a national fire hotspots detection and mapping system operated by Geoscience Australia. Sentinel was developed collaboratively by Geoscience Australia and CSIRO and has been operating since 2003. Hotspots are detected using satellite-based sensors monitoring all of Australia up to four times each day. The information is freely available to end-users through a web-site, as data feeds and down-loads. Sentinel has detected over 4 million hot-spots so far. In 2014 Geoscience Australia re-developed Sentinel including: - A more robust and maintainable 'backend' system, enabling quick and easy ingestion of new sources of hotspot data and fire related products - Improved user interface for the visualization of current hotspots and download of archived hotspots data - Separate access for emergency management users to ensure reliable access to hotspots data during major events - Improved interoperability, through reconsideration of the attributes used to describe a hotspot, anticipating the need for a standard approach to this problem

  • This suite of products contains topographical relief generated from raw LiDAR data and covers the Southern extent of the Murray Darling Basin within the proximity of the Murray River. LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) is an airborne remote sensing technique for rapid collection of terrain data. The sensor used for this LiDAR project collected XYZ and Intensity data for 2 returns, first and last (ground) return by bouncing a pulse from the aircraft to the surface that enables the height and intensity values to be calculated. Height data within the first and last return raw LiDAR data was processed into 1m pixel DEMs. The intensity data with the first return raw LiDAR data was processed into a 1m pixel intensity image. The 1m cell size products, due to their large file sizes, are stored as 2km by 2km tiles to help facilitate data management and processing. The complete study area, covering 1.7million hectares, contains 5,288 of these tiles. All the above derived products were initially created as value added products by the Land Information Group (LIG), of the Department of Sustainability and Environment (DSE), Victoria. This acquisition was commissioned by Murray Darling Basin Commission (MDBC) and participating Consortium members including: Barmah Millewa Forum Murray Irrigation Limited, NSW Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Natural Resources - Deniliquin North Central Catchment Management Authority (CMA) Department of Urban Affairs and Planning, NSW Goulburn Broken CMA, Vic North East CMA, Vic

  • A fully four-dimensional (3D x time) object-oriented biophysical dispersal model was developed to simulate the movement of marine larvae over semi-continuous surfaces. The model is capable of handling massive numbers of simulated larvae, can accommodate diverse life history patterns and distributions of characteristics, and saves point-level information to a relational database management system.