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  • Part I. deals with Devonian coral faunas from the West Kimberleys, the East Kimberleys, and the Carnarvon Basin of Western Australia. Of the 30 species described and illustrated from the West Kimberley's, 22 are from the Pilbara Limestone, and of these fifteen are from the main (lower) part of the Limestone of Givetian age, but there are five from the Atrypa beds of Teichert which the Bureau of Mineral Resources equates with the upper part of the Pillara Limestone and which may be late Givetian or possibly Frasnian; one Disphyllurn occurs in Atrypa beds referred by Teichert to Oberdevonstufe (Frasnian). This Pillara Limestone fauna (lower and upper) is dominated by Disphyllum with Hexagonaria, Thamnopora, and Alveolites also important. The overlying Mount Pierre Group, of Frasnian (Oberdevonstufe I) and early Famennian (ll and III) age, and the Bugle Gap Limestone (IV), have a strikingly different fauna mostly of small slender solitary corals. A new genus of Rugosa, Catactotoechus, type, species C. irregularis sp. nov., is described and figured. The East Kimberley corals are the Upper Devonian Palaeosmlia contexta sp. novo and Syringopora patula Hinde. From the Carnarvon Basin only four species are known, all from the Gneudna Formation; the genera to which they belong are those dominant and characteristic in the Pillara Limestone of the West Kimberleys, and in upper Givetian and early Frasnian faunas elsewhere, so that the Gneudna Formation Is probably of this age; the lack of identical species between the Carnanon and Kimberley Basins may be due to differences of province rather than time. The Western Australian Givetian coral faunas contain no species in common with those of eastern Australia, and many of the genera characteristic in eastern Australia, such as Endophyllum,, Sanidophyllum, and Heliolitcs, are absent in Western Australia. Part II deals with fragmentary coral material from the Silurian limestone, near Kiandra, southern New South Wales, including Halysites brevicatenatus sp. nov.; only two species are identified with previously described Australian forms, but the age indicated is probably Wenlockian, possibly Ludlovian.

  • The Corporate Administrative Records Collection of Geoscience Australia (GA) is a bi fold collection; consisting of electronic/digital documents and records in physical paper format. GA's corporate administrative records in physical format are created by the Records Management Unit upon request from staff members when their needs meet specific criteria. The files themselves are bound in cardboard folders and labelled and bar-coded according to their respective classification level and metadata information. Individually, the files are a detailed narrative of specific business activities; describing all of the administrative processes that occurred during an activity. The collection is organised according to a year series system; a method which has been constant throughout GA's evolution. The collection also consists of inherited physical records from various government departments. These include the AFFA series from the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Australia and the UB Series, sourced from the Uranium Branch. In collaboration with the relevant government departments, GA acceded custody of these series, and they are now managed in juxtaposition with the entire GA collection.

  • These documents have been scanned by the GA Library. Please refer to the document for contents.

  • These documents have been scanned by the GA Library. Please refer to the document for contents.

  • These documents have been scanned by the GA Library. Please refer to the document for contents.

  • These documents have been scanned by the GA Library. Please refer to the document for contents.

  • The seismic survey made by the Geophysical Section of the Bureau of Mineral Resources to assist in the search for oil in the Carnarvon (North-West) Basin of Western Australia. The seismic field work in the Carnarvon Basin was confined to one field season, i.e., from April to December 1951, and consisted of surveys on the Capa Range and Giralia Anticlines. Both refraction and reflection methods were used. The purpose of the seismic work was to determine if the structures at surface extended to depth and thus establish if a suitable site for a deep exploration drill hole exist. The seismic work has shown that seismic methods are applicable in the investigation of possible oil-bearing struotures in the Carnarvon Basin. It is clear from the results obtained on the Giralia Anticline, that investigation with a view to tile selection ot deep drilling sites cannot be carried out thoroughly without seismic surveys of selected areas.

  • A refleotion traverse was shot across the centre part of the Giralia Anticline in the Carnarvon Basin of Western Australia, in an attempt to verify the unconformity between Mesozoic and Palaeozoic sediments shown by a previous traverse across the northern part of the anticline. Shallow seismic events recorded were of good quality and correlated very well with surface geology. They also indicated two faults in places where steep dips in surface beds might, by anaJogy with the northern end, be expected. Deep events were in general of poor quality and inconsistent. However, over approximately a mile of the traverse, they were of good quality and indicated nonconformity with the shallow events.