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  • A symposium was held at the University of Wales, Swansea in July 2007 to honour the career and achievements of Professor Michael Collins. The symposium was organised by Michael's former postgraduate students as a tribute to his contributions over the past 30 years as a scientist, teacher, mentor and friend. About 30 of the 50+ Ph.D. and M.Sc. students that Michael has supervised over the years were fortunate to attend the symposium, which offered the opportunity for all of us to learn about the many different subjects and projects that Michael supervised and to renew our friendships with the Collins family, as well as the extended, academic Collins 'family'.

  • The 2002 report to the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) <i>Natural disasters in Australia: Reforming mitigation, relief and recovery arrangements</i> advocated a 'fundamental shift in focus towards cost-effective, evidence-based disaster mitigation'. The report stated that in Australia there was a 'lack of independent and comprehensive systematic natural disaster risk assessments, and natural disaster data and analysis'. One key solution proposed to address this gap in our knowledge is outlined in Reform Commitment 1 in the report: <i>Develop and implement a five-year national programme of systematic and rigorous disaster risk assessments</i>. This framework is designed to improve our collective knowledge about natural hazard risk in Australia to support emergency risk management and natural hazard mitigation. The natural hazards covered are those defined in the report to COAG: bushfire, earthquake, flood, storm, cyclone, storm surge, landslide, tsunami, meteorite strike and tornado. Many events have demonstrated that the importance of natural hazards does not lie simply in the generation and passage of events such as severe storms or floods, but in the wide-reaching and profound impacts that these events can have on communities. Risk 1 is defined as: A concept to describe the likelihood of harmful consequences arising from the interaction of hazards, communities and the environment. This framework focuses on risk assessment for sudden onset natural hazards to underpin natural hazard risk management and natural hazard mitigation. The framework does not focus on risk management or mitigation, although its outcomes support and benefit these. The framework covers the following risks arising from natural hazards: financial, socio-economic, casualty, political and environmental risk. Each of these risks contributes to the overall impacts of natural hazards on communities . This framework is aimed foremost at those who seek an improved evidence base for risk management of natural hazards, in all levels of government. The framework is also intended for risk assessment practitioners, researchers and information managers. The primary driver of the framework is the need to develop an improved evidence base for effective risk management decisions on natural hazards. Developing this improved evidence base will also deliver on COAG Reform Commitment 1. Other key drivers include: - Cooperative approaches across all levels of government to managing natural hazards; - A consistent approach to natural hazard risk assessment; - Risk management for cross-jurisdictional and catastrophic disasters; - The potential impacts of climate change from possible changes in the frequency or severity of weather related natural hazards; - Increasing exposure of populations to natural hazards through demographic change and increases in personal assets.

  • The question as to whether geophysical data from habitats can be used to predict the occurrence of benthic biodiversity is becoming more important with the increase in the use of Marine Protected Areas as tools for marine conservation. To help answer this question and to better understand the relationship between sediment, geomorphology and benthos, a multibeam sonar survey was conducted over two areas in the northern Great Barrier Reef - Gulf of Papua region. View this article in Geological Association of Canada Special Publication 47 pp. 247-263

  • Close up map of Submarine Cables and southern protection zone around Clovelly / Tamarama, Sydney. For internal use by ACMA. Included in this version is The Peak Anchoring Zone and 1000 metre Offshore Line. This map developed from previos map GeoCat 64812 (June 06).

  • Close up map of Submarine Cables and northern protection zone around Narrabeen, Sydney. For internal use by ACMA. Including on this version Long Reef Anchoring Zone and 1000 metre Offshore line. This map developed from previous map GeoCat 64811 (June 06).

  • CAML is a five year International Program which will be undertaken as a major activity during the International Polar Year. This project will bring together all known data on Antarctic marine biodiversity and ocean change. The Antarctic Ocean is one of the most sensitive ecosystems in the world. Research undertaken via CAML will produce fascinating images of the Southern Ocean Geoscience Australia's Marine and Coastal Group is contributing expertise in sea floor mapping and sediment core collection to CAML. The Australian Government Antarctic Division is collecting oceanographic data, video footage and sediment cores through hot-water drill holes in the Amery Ice Shelf. The sediment cores are collected using a corer designed and built by Geoscience Australia, and are being analysed by scientists at Geoscience Australia to understand the environmental history beneath this ice shelf. This project has now produced four cores. The only other core ever obtained from beneath an extant ice shelf from under the Ross Ice Shelf in the early 1970s showed no signs of life. However, several Amery cores contain diatom-rich sediments, and one contains a succession of benthic faunas that indicate progressive colonisation of the sub-ice sea floor as ice retreated and currents began to seep nutrients and plankton into the sub-ice shelf cavity.

  • Map produced for the Australian Fisheries Management Authority showing the position of all apprehensions for 2006. This map is for internal use by AFMA and is not for general release.

  • Close up map of Submarine Cables and northern protection zone around Narrabeen, Sydney. Now includes the anchoring buffer zone of 0.2 nautical miles and six (6) fishing sites. For internal use by ACMA

  • This map is produced fro the Australian Fisheries Management Authority to assist in their enforcement of Australia's Maritime Bounadries. It has an explanation of the maritime boundaries and their coordinates in the Arafura Sea and Torres Strait. Originally produced using the Indonesian language. This version is an English translation. It is not for sale or public release by Geoscience Australia. Public release is thru DEH and AFMA.

  • This map is produced fro the Australian Fisheries Management Authority to assist in their enforcement of Australia's Maritime Bounadries. It has lots of icons to explain to Indonesian fishermen where that can and cannot fish in the Arafura Sea and Torres Strait. Originally produced using the Indonesian language. This version is an English translation. It is not for sale or public release by Geoscience Australia. Public release is thru DEH and AFMA.