From 1 - 10 / 345
  • This web service displays the results of a marine survey conducted by Geoscience Australia in Commonwealth waters of the north-eastern Browse Basin (Caswell Sub-basin) between 9 October and 9 November 2014. The additional codes GA-0345 and GA-0346 refer to Geoscience Australia (GA) internal codes and TAN1411 is the vessel survey number given by the RV Tangaroa for 2014.

  • Benthic sediment sampling of Inner Darwin Harbour (GA0358) and shallow water areas in and around Bynoe Harbour (GA0359) was undertaken between May 29 and June 19, 2017. Partners involved in the surveys included Geoscience Australia (GA), the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources within the Northern Territory Government (NT DENR) (formerly the Department of Land and Resource Management (DLRM)). These surveys form part of a four year (2014-2018) science program aimed at improving knowledge about the marine environments in the regions around Darwin and Bynoe Harbour’s through the collection and collation of baseline data that will enable the creation of thematic habitat maps to underpin marine resource management decisions. This project is being led by the Northern Territory Government and is supported by the INPEX-led Ichthys LNG Project, in collaboration with - and co-investment from GA and AIMS. This dataset comprises total sediment metabolism, carbonate, organic isotope and organic and inorganic element measurements on seabed sediments.

  • Legacy product - no abstract available

  • Tropical cyclones affect storm-dominated sediment transport processes that characterise Holocene shelf deposits in many shelf environments. In this paper, we describe the geomorphology of reef talus deposits found in the Gulf of Carpentaria and Arafura Sea, Australia,that we attribute to tropical cyclones. The orientation of these deposits is also indicative of a consistent, along-coast transport pathway.

  • Legacy product - no abstract available

  • The Solomon Sea is a semi-enclosed oceanic basin bordered by technically active land masses: its morphology is dominated by an arcuate trough, the New Britain Trench, which bounds the basin on its northern side and is over 8000 metres deep. Density of soundings is sufficient to reveal a large scale left-lateral displacement near the western end of the New Britain Trench; this appears to be a continuation of the onshore Markham-Ramu Lineament. The same structure controls the position of the Markham submarine canyon, which is the major conduit feeding sediment to the ocean basin. No continental shelf is developed along the northern margin of the Huon Gulf owing to the strong and continuing uplift of the Huon Peninsula, which lies within the Northern New Guinea Arc structural province. South of Lae, however, a narrow continental shelf is present. Seismic reflection profiles reveal that this shelf is a geologically young constructional feature, composed in its upper levels of a coalescing series of deltaic deposits. In some areas these can be seen resting directly on non-sedimentary basement. Several submarine canyons cross the shelf and each is closely related to a large river onshore. The seismic records clearly show truncation of strata by the canyon walls: however, it is postulated that upgrowth of the shelf around the canyons, with occasional slumping along the rims, as well as axial downcutting by abrasive sediment flowage, have controlled the formation of the canyons. Their steep axial gradients, which average about 5° compared with the shelf surface which slopes seaward at only 1°, are taken to indicate that the canyons were initiated before the Pleistocene and have maintained their courses during the upward and outward growth of the deltaic deposits forming the present day continental shelf.

  • Legacy product - no abstract available