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  • Since the first visits by European explorers nearly five hundred years ago, the islands of New Guinea have been visited by explorers and scientists from many nations, including England, Portugal, Netherlands, Germany, Spain, France, Italy, Russia, America, Japan, and Australia. Early contacts ranged from brief watering and careening stays to exploratory cruises charting shorelines. During the 19th century, when German and British colonial administrations were being established, exploration was carried out during border-demarcation surveys, by expeditions mounted specifically to explore the interior of the island, and by mission and administration patrols. Since late in the 19th century a considerable volume of information has been collected by scientific expeditions organized by overseas institutions or governments, by petroleum exploration groups, and by mineral prospecting and mining groups and individuals. In recent years many overseas mining and prospecting companies have been active. All these ventures have contributed to our knowledge of the geology and geomorphology of the island. At times the published written record of investigations has been fragmentary and obscure, at others comprehensive and readily available. It is the aim of this bibliography to bring together as much as possible of the published data in the fields of geology, geomorphology, and pedology. For practical reasons the scope of its coverage has been limited to that part of the island system east of meridian 141 °E. West of this meridian is Irian Jaya; east of it are New Guinea and the neighbouring islands. Current official place names have been used throughout the text.

  • A collection of palaeontological papers 1972 (bulletin 150)

  • The Sydney Basin extends for 380 km along the east coast of New South Wales south of latitude 32°S, and has an onshore area of about 36 000 km2 . About 4800 m of Permian and Triassic sedimentary rocks are preserved in the basin which lies between the New England and Lachlan Fold Belts. The study of the Sydney Basin by the Sedimentary Basins Study Group of the Petroleum Exploration Branch of the Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources was undertaken in co-operation with the New South Wales Department of Mines, who prepared a 1:500 000 geological map (PI. 1). The study has required constant exchange of ideas and information with petroleum exploration companies and the Department of Mines. In addition to the authors of this Bulletin the following members of the Sedimentary Basins Study Group since late 1966 have contributed to the study: D. J. Forman, M. A. Reynolds, K. G. Smith, R. Bryan, A. R. Jensen, P. J. Alcock, P. J. Hawkins, R. B. P. Pitt, S. Ozimic, J. I. Raine, K. Rixon, and B. G. West.

  • The Bureau of Mineral Resources made three seismic surveys in the Ngalia Basin, Northern Territory, during 1967 to 1969 as part of a comprehensive geological and geophysical investigation of the structure and stratigraphy of the basin. L097 is the third survey done in 1969. The project was aimed at delineating the configuration of the basin, within which outcrops are sparse, and providing information pertaining to its depositional and tectonic history. Investigation of the extent of Lower Palaeozoic sedimentation was considered to be important in assessment of the petroleum prospects of the basin. Raw data for this survey are available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 75660

  • Legacy product - no abstract available

  • Legacy product - no abstract available

  • Legacy product - no abstract available