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  • This report provides a description of the activities completed during the Outer Darwin Harbour Mapping Survey, from 28 May and 23 June 2015 on the RV Solander (Survey GA0351/SOL6187). This survey was a collaboration between Geoscience Australia (GA), the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and Department of Land Resource Management (Northern Territory Government) and the first of four surveys in the Darwin Harbour Seabed Habitat Mapping Program. This 4 year program (2014-2018) aims to improve knowledge of the marine environments in the Darwin and Bynoe Harbour regions by collating and collecting baseline information and developing thematic habitat maps that will underpin future marine resource management decisions. The program was made possible through funds provided by the INPEX-led Ichthys LNG Project to Northern Territory Government Department of Land Resource Management, and co-investment from Geoscience Australia and Australian Institute of Marine Science. The specific objectives of the Outer Darwin Harbour Marine Survey GA0351/SOL6187 were to: 1. Obtain high resolution geophysical (bathymetry) data for outer Darwin Harbour, including Shoal Bay; 2. Characterise substrates (acoustic backscatter properties, grainsize, sediment chemistry) for outer Darwin Harbour, including Shoal Bay; and 3. Collect tidal data for the survey area. Data acquired during the survey included: 720 km2 multibeam sonar bathymetry and acoustic backscatter; 96 sampling stations collecting seabed sediments, underwater photography and video imagery and oceanographic information including tidal data and 54 sound velocity profiles.

  • This report was compiled and written to summarise the four-year (2008 to 2012) 'Sustainable management of coastal groundwater resources' project. This project was funded by the National Water Commission's (NWC) Raising National Water Standards Program. Geoscience Australia was a key project partner, and worked closely with collaborators from Ecoseal, Arche Consulting, GHD, Kempsey Shire Council and the NSW Department of Primary Industries (Office of Water). The summary report was published under the National Water Commission's 'Waterlines' series. This executive summary document is supported by related publications that deal with the following topics: 1. hydrogeology, monitoring and hydrochemistry; 2. development of a groundwater flow and transport model for the Macleay Sands Aquifer; 3. mapping and risk assessment of groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs); 4. development and application of early warning indicators to assess the condition of groundwater resources; and 5. socioeconomic assessment and cost-benefit analysis, The key project objective was to develop an integrated approach for managing the availability and quality of coastal groundwater resources so that coastal aquifers do not become overallocated, depleted or degraded as a consequence of increasing demand from rapidly expanding urban centres such as South West Rocks. The second objective was to combine groundwater and seawater intrusion modelling tools, assessment of groundwater dependent ecosystems (GDEs), and a framework for applying indicators and cost–benefit analysis to support the long-term management of coastal sand aquifers. These methodologies can then be applied to similar coastal sand dune aquifers along the North Coast of New South Wales and help ensure that any new groundwater sources are developed sustainably, with minimal impact on GDEs such as coastal dune vegetation communities. The study will help improve management of groundwater resources in coastal dune aquifers in the Mid North Coast region and, potentially, other coastal communities reliant on coastal dune systems for water supplies.

  • Fresh groundwater stored in Australian coastal aquifers is an important resource for humans and the natural environment. Many Australian coastal aquifers are vulnerable to seawater intrusion (SWI)—the landward encroachment of sea water into coastal aquifers—which can significantly degrade water quality and reduce freshwater availability. The increasing demands for fresh water in coastal areas and the anticipated impacts of climate change (such as sea-level rise and variations in rainfall recharge) may result in increases in the incidence and severity of SWI. Comprehensive investigations of SWI are relatively uncommon and the extent of monitoring and investigations specific to SWI are highly variable across the nation. In response to the threat posed by SWI, Geoscience Australia and the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training, in collaboration with state and territory water agencies, undertook a national-scale assessment of the vulnerability of coastal aquifers to SWI. This assessment identified the coastal groundwater resources that are most vulnerable to SWI, including future consequences of over-extraction, sea-level rise, and recharge–discharge variations associated with climate change. The study focused on assessing the vulnerability of coastal aquifers to the landward migration of the freshwater–saltwater interface, rather than surface waterbodies.

  • Tracking changes in the canopy density of mangroves, Digital Earth Australia (DEA) Mangrove Canopy Cover reveals how these extraordinary trees may be responding to sea level rise, severe tropical cyclones, drought, climatic cycles, changing temperatures and large storm events. Mangroves provide a diverse array of ecosystem services but these are impacted upon by both natural and anthropogenic drivers of change. In Australia, mangroves are protected by law and hence the natural drivers predominate. It is important to know the extent and canopy density of mangroves in Australia so that we can measure how mangroves are responding to sea level rise, severe tropical cyclones and climatic cycles. This product provides valuable information about the extent and canopy density of mangroves for each year between 1987 and 2018 for the entire Australian coastline. The canopy cover classes are: - 20-50% (pale green) - 50-80% (mid green) - 80-100% (dark green) The product consists of a sequence (one per year) of 30 m resolution maps that are generated by analysing the Landsat fractional cover developed by the Joint Remote Sensing Research Program and the Global Mangrove Watch layers developed by the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency. This product is the result of a collaboration between Geoscience Australia, the University of Aberyswyth, CSIRO, the Joint Remote Sensing Research Program and the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network.

  • The service contains the Australian Coastal Geomorphology Landform Subtype Classifications, used to support a national coastal risk assessment. It describes the location and extent of landform subtypes identifiable at scales between 1:25,000 and 1:10,000. It also provides further detail to the Landform Type, with particular reference to feature stability (e.g. dune types) and mobility (e.g. channel types). It is cached service with a Web Mercator Projection.

  • The service contains the Australian Coastal Geomorphology Scale Guide, used to support a national coastal risk assessment. It includes the extents of various reclassified costal mapping products. It is cached service with a Web Mercator Projection.

  • The service contains the Australian Coastal Geomorphology Landform Type Classifications, used to support a national coastal risk assessment. It describes the location and extent of landform types identifiable at scales between 1:250,000 and 1:25,000. It describes the landform types present in either erosional or dispositional environments. It is cached service with a Web Mercator Projection.

  • The service contains the Australian Coastal Geomorphology Scale Guide, used to support a national coastal risk assessment. It includes the extents of various reclassified costal mapping products. It is cached service with a Web Mercator Projection.

  • The service contains the Australian Coastal Geomorphology Environments, used to support a national coastal risk assessment. It describes the location and extent primary geomorphological environments (both dispositional and erosional) present along the Australia coast and the processes acting on the features within. It is cached service with a Web Mercator Projection.

  • The service contains the Australian Coastal Geomorphology Landform Subtype Classifications, used to support a national coastal risk assessment. It describes the location and extent of landform subtypes identifiable at scales between 1:25,000 and 1:10,000. It also provides further detail to the Landform Type, with particular reference to feature stability (e.g. dune types) and mobility (e.g. channel types). It is cached service with a Web Mercator Projection.