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  • Legacy product - no abstract available

  • Legacy product - no abstract available

  • Legacy product - no abstract available

  • Mount Marumba covers the central part of Arnhem Land, which is occupied mainly by the Katherine River, Mount Rigg and Roper Groups of the Palaeoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic McArthur Basin succession. These units consist of marine and non-marine clastics, carbonates, and lesser volcanics, that are extensively intruded by dolerite and some microgranite. Recent mapping and associated structural, geophysical, geochemical and geochronological studies has led to a number of important results, including: (a) the Jimbu Microgranite intruded the Katherine River Group at ~1710 Ma, causing updoming of surrounding sediments to form a number of structural domes; (b) the former Kombolgie Formation has been elevated to a Subgroup, subdivded into component formations, and extended upwards to include the McKay Sandstone; and (c) the Gulpuliyul Structure, a major impact structure formed between ~1600 and 1324 Ma, was recognized 45 km NW of Bulman. The mapping and interpretation took advantage of the full complement of regional gravity, airborne magnetic and gamma-ray spectometric datasets now available. Concealed dykes, lineaments and sill edges are overprinted on the surface geology in magenta. In addition, the map features 1:1 000 000-scale marginal figures of an enhanced total magnetic intensity image and a gamma-ray spectroscopy image. A 1:3 000 000-scale marginal map provides the regional setting. Two cross-sections highlight the salient features of the stratigraphy and structure.

  • A booklet that explains scale, distances, directions, map projections, latitude and longitude, grid references, legends and contours. Utilises the Rockhampton 1:100,000 topographic map for examples. Student activities included.

  • Mount Marumba covers the central part of Arnhem Land, which is occupied mainly by the Katherine River, Mount Rigg and Roper Groups of the Palaeoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic McArthur Basin succession. These units consist of marine and non-marine clastics, carbonates, and lesser volcanics, that are extensively intruded by dolerite and some microgranite. Recent mapping and associated structural, geophysical, geochemical and geochronological studies have resulted in a number of important new findings: (1) The Jimbu Microgranite intruded the Katherine River Group at ~1710 Ma, causing updoming of surrounding sediments to form a number of structural domes. (2) An age of 1324 Ma has been obtained from the Derim Derim Dolerite, intruding the Roper Group, that provides improved constraints on the ages of sedimentation and deformation. (3) An aeolian facies has been recognised within the Gundy Sandstone. (4) The former Kombolgie Formation has been elevated to a Subgroup, subdivded into component formations, and extended upwards to include the McKay Sandstone. (5) A major impact structure, the Gulpuliyul Structure, was formed between ~1600 and 1324 Ma.The mapping and interpretation took advantage of the full complement of regional gravity, airborne magnetic and gamma-ray spectometric datasets now available. Concealed dykes, lineaments and sill edges are overprinted on the surface geology in magenta. In addition, the map features 1:1 000 000-scale marginal figures of an enhanced total magnetic intensity image and a gamma-ray spectroscopy image. Two cross-sections highlight the salient features of the stratigraphy and structure. The 84-page Explanatory Notes presents descriptions of the geology in some detail, in sections on the regional geological setting, stratigraphy, geophysics, structure, geological history and economic geology. The text is supported by several tables and numerous black-and-white photographs and line drawings, as well as some full-colour images.

  • A clear trend has now emerged to integrate spatial data with mainstream corporate data management systems, and the technology to do this is now largely to hand. GIS is becoming less of a specialist field and more closely tied to general data management. These advances apply not just to 2-dimensional data but to 3 or more dimensions - going beyond the bounds of conventional Euclidean space. The technology to handle n-dimensional space that is widely used in business data-warehousing applications can now be put to use handling the complexities of geochrono-logical, geochemical and geophysical space. This is extremely good news for geoscience, which has never sat very comfortably within the 2-dimensional confines of traditional GIS systems. Now we can expect to see the beginnings of true geoscience information systems that can be applied to space-time chunks of the earth's crust in the search for minerals and oil.

  • This map is part of a series which comprises 50 maps which covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:1 000 000 (1cm on a map represents 10km on the ground). Each standard map covers an area of 6 degrees longitude by 4 degrees latitude or about 590 kilometres east to west and about 440 kilometres from north to south. These maps depict natural and constructed features including transport infrastructure (roads, railway airports), hydrography, contours, hypsometric and bathymetric layers, localities and some administrative boundaries, making this a useful general reference map.

  • This map is part of a series which comprises 50 maps which covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:1 000 000 (1cm on a map represents 10km on the ground). Each standard map covers an area of 6 degrees longitude by 4 degrees latitude or about 590 kilometres east to west and about 440 kilometres from north to south. These maps depict natural and constructed features including transport infrastructure (roads, railway airports), hydrography, contours, hypsometric and bathymetric layers, localities and some administrative boundaries, making this a useful general reference map.

  • This map is part of a series which comprises 50 maps which covers the whole of Australia at a scale of 1:1 000 000 (1cm on a map represents 10km on the ground). Each standard map covers an area of 6 degrees longitude by 4 degrees latitude or about 590 kilometres east to west and about 440 kilometres from north to south. These maps depict natural and constructed features including transport infrastructure (roads, railway airports), hydrography, contours, hypsometric and bathymetric layers, localities and some administrative boundaries, making this a useful general reference map.