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  • In response to the proposal for a new administrative building to be erected, 1/4 mile east of Parliament House, nine test pits were put down by the Department of the Interior for the purpose of examining the sub-surface conditions. Four of the pits were used for engineering tests of the bearing power of the rock foundations. The geology of the site is discussed in this report.

  • Details and results are given of a seismic refraction survey made at the request of the Hydro-Electric Commission of Tasmania, to investigate the site of the western portal of the proposed Mossy Marsh Tunnel. The tunnel is part of the No. 2 Tarraleah Canal project to transport water from Lake King William to Tarraleah Power Station. The primary object of the survey was to determine the thickness of till overlying the dolerite bedrock, and hence contours of the bedrock surface.

  • The four field parties and the Airborne Geophysical Section continued operations in the area during the quarter ending 30th September, 1953. This report provides a summary of the geological and geophysical operations carried out during this period, and an overview of the staff and housing situation.

  • The establishment of seismological and magnetic observatories at Heard Island is described. Brief descriptions and photographs of the huts and instruments are given. Earthquake phases recorded between April 1951 and February 1952 are listed, as are absolute magnetic observations made between July 1951 and January 1952. Although Heard Island has two active volcanic craters, the region is not very active seismically. Only two near earthquakes were recorded, both probably 2°.9 distant along the Kerguelen ridge. The absolute magnetic observations showed that the high rate of secular change in declination and horizontal intensity is continuing.

  • Existing sources of water supply are described. Proposals for improving the supply of town water are considered. Further investigations are recommended with respect to tapping the southern lobe of the local basin, surface conservation, underground water resources, and the selection of a possible dam site.

  • On May 3rd, and again on June 1st, the author visited the Cotter dam to investigate a reported loss of water from the fault on the northern side of the wall. This report gives an account of these visits, together with the author's observations and conclusions in relation to the reported water loss.

  • This geological report on the Jervis Bay firebrick clay deposit and the Jervis Bay aerodrome is comprised in three distinct sections. The first discusses the situation and production history of the area, and describes the geological surveys completed to date. The second describes the geology and topography of the aerodrome. The final section describes the investigation of the firebrick clay and the results of this investigation, with reference to the aerodrome and the proposal for a new runway. Accompanying plans of the clay deposit and the aerodrome are included.

  • For nearly nine months of the year the river proper is confined to a narrow channel two to three hundred feet wide. During the remainder of the year, however, the river is subject to periodical floodings resulting from heavy tropical rain on its water-shed and for periods of a week of more at a time the low level bridge is covered by flood water. The dislocation of rail traffic which results from these periodical floodings has been a matter of serious concern to the Queensland authorities for many years and a decision was made to construct a high level rail and road bridge to replace the existing structure. Construction was commenced, but before it proceeded far, it was considered desirable that the depth of the bedrock, previously examined, should be established without doubt. In view of the uncertainty of the depth to be drilled and the very considerable difficulty in drilling through alternating layers of drift sand and boulder wash, a request was made by the Co-ordinator General of Public works for Queensland for a geophysical investigation of the site. A survey was carried out by the geophysical section of the Commonwealth Bureau of Mineral Resources during August and September, 1947. The investigation of the results is far from complete but the seismic method gave such concise results that this preliminary statement is justified. Geology, geophysical methods, results, interpretation, and testing are discussed in this report.

  • An examination was made of a proposed dam site at Geehi in April, 1947. The report comprises notes on access, general geology, evidence gathered from aerial photography, and the suitability of the site. Three accompanying plans, and a petrographic report on rocks collected from the vicinity, are appended to this report.

  • This report has been prepared at the request of Engineers of the Department of Works and Housing. The writer spent a day with Mr. Crotty examining the site, and another day alone studying general geological conditions relevant to the proposed scheme. The visit and its findings are outlined in this report.