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  • This map shows the area of the Portland Area Trawl Closure within the Commonwealth Trawl Sector (also known as the Commonwealth South East Trawl Fishery (SETF)) of the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery. Modified from GeoCat 68493 (2008) as per the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery (Closures) Direction No. 1 2009 - Schedule 23. Produced for the Australian Fisheries Management Authority. Not for public sale or distribution by GA.

  • Northern Territory of Australia Mineral deposits map 1:2.5 million

  • Northern Territory Stratigraphy map 1:2.5m

  • Papua New Guinea Mineral Deposits 1:2 500 000 million

  • Papua New Guinea Geographic map 1:2 500 000

  • This map shows the area of the Eastern South Australia Trawl Closure within the Commonwealth Trawl Sector (also known as the South East Trawl Fishery (SETF)) of the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery. Developed as per the Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery (Closures) Direction 2008 - Schedule 22. Produced for the Australian Fisheries Management Authority. Not for public sale or distribution by GA.

  • The `Inferred Isotopic Domain Boundaries of Australia data set is based on an interpretation of the recently released Neodymium depleted mantle model age map of Australia (GA Record 2013/44). The isotopic map of Australia was produced by gridding two-stage depleted mantle model ages calculated from Sm-Nd isotopic data for just over 1490 samples of felsic igneous rocks throughout Australia. The resultant isotopic map serves as a proxy for bulk crustal ages and accordingly allows the potential recognition of geological domains with differing geological histories. One of the major aims of the Neodymium depleted mantle model age map, therefore, was to use the isotopic map (and associated data) to aid in the recognition and definition of crustal blocks (geological terranes) at the continental and regional scale. Such boundaries are recognisable by regional changes in isotopic signature but are hindered by the variable and often low density of isotopic data points. Accordingly two major procedures have been adopted to locate the regional distribution of such boundaries across the geological continent. In areas of high data density (and high confidence), such as the Yilgarn Craton Western Australia, isotopic data alone was used to delineate crustal domains. In such regions it is evident that identified crustal blocks often but not universally approximate known geological terranes. In areas of moderate data density (and corresponding moderate confidence) (smoothed) boundaries of known geological provinces were used as a proxy for the isotopic boundary. For both high and moderate data densities identified crustal boundaries were extended (with corresponding less confidence) into regions of lower data density. In areas of low data density (and low confidence) boundaries were either based on other geological and/or geophysical data sets or were not attempted. The latter was particularly the case for regions covered by thick sedimentary successions. Two levels of confidence have been documented, namely the level of confidence in the location of the isotopic domain boundary, and the level of confidence that a boundary may actually exist. The `Inferred Isotopic Domain Boundaries of Australia map shows the locations of inferred boundaries of isotopic domains, which are assumed to represent the crustal blocks that comprise the Australia continent. The map therefore provides constraints on the three dimensional architecture of Australia, and allows a better understanding of how the Australian continent was constructed from the Mesoarchean through to the Phanerozoic. It is best viewed as a dynamic dataset, which will need to be refined and updated as new information, such as new isotopic data, becomes available.

  • The 1:2.5M scale geology of Australia data documents the distribution and age of major stratigraphic, intrusive and medium to high-grade metamorphic rock units of onshore Australia. This edition contains the same geological content as the previous edition, but is structured according to Geoscience Australia's 2010 data standards and is provided in additional digital formats. The dataset was compiled to use at scales between 1:2.5 million and 1:5 million inclusive. The units distinguished/mapped mainly represent stratigraphic supergroups, regional intrusive associations and regional metamorphic complexes. Groupings of Precambrian units in the time-space diagram are generally separated by major time breaks; Phanerozoic units are grouped according to stratigraphic age i.e. System/Period. The time-space diagram has the added benefit that it provides a summary of units currently included on the themes. The method used to distinguish sedimentary and many volcanic units varies for each geological eon as follows: <ul><li>Cainozoic units are morphological units which emphasise the relationship of the sedimentary fill to the landscape.</li> <li>Mesozoic units are regionally extensive to continent-wide time-rock units which emphasise the System of Period(s).</li> <li>Palaeozoic units are stratotectonic units that emphasise either the dominant System or Period(s) or the range of Periods.</li> <li>Proterozoic units are commonly regional stratotectonic units - separated by major time breaks and split into the Palaeoproterozoic, Mesoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic Eras - which are generally unique to each cratonic region.</li> <li>Archaean units are regional lithological units grouped into broad time divisions.</li> <li>Metamorphic units are lithological units which emphasise the metamorphic facies and timing of the last major metamorphic event. </li> <li>Igneous units are regional units which emphasise the dominant lithology and are grouped into broad time divisions.</li></ul>

  • This is a national seamless data product aimed at regional or national applications. TOPO 2.5M 1998 contains a small scale vector representation of the topographic mapping features of Australia. The data include the following themes: Hydrography - drainage networks including rivers, lakes and offshore features; and Infrastructure - roads, railways, localities and built-up areas. Data was primarily sourced from Geoscience Australia`s GEODATA TOPO-250K data set however all features were revised in 1998. Free online and CD-ROM (fee applies).