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  • This wind field was produced within v2.0 of TCRM, using data from the Bureau of Meteorology to constrain the wind field. Wind multipliers were calculated using a landcover dataset derived from Landsat and Digital Earth Australia. This wind field may be refined in the future as new data becomes available. This record includes - the track data from the Bureau of Meteorology used to model Tropical Cyclone Debbie - the landcover dataset produced for the Airlie Beach region - the preliminary local wind field

  • Tropical cyclone scenario prepared for Tonga National Emergency Management Office (NEMO) as part of the PacSAFE Project (2016-2018)

  • The collection of products released for the 2018 National Tropical Cyclone Hazard Assessment (TCHA18). - 2018 National Tropical Cyclone Hazard Assessment - 2018 National Tropical Cyclone Hazard Assessment Stochastic Event Catalogue - 2018 National Tropical Cyclone Hazard Assessment Hazard Map - Tropical Cyclone Risk Model

  • Tropical cyclone scenario prepared for Tonga National Emergency Management Office (NEMO) as part of the PacSAFE Project (2016-2018)

  • The TCHA18 Stochastic Event Catalogue contains artificially generated tropical cyclone tracks and wind fields representing 10000 years of tropical cyclone activity. The catalogue stores the track of each event in annual collections (i.e. one simulated year per file). The wind field of each event is stored in a separate file, containing the maximum wind speed, the components (eastward and northward wind) corresponding to the maximum wind speed, and the minimum sea level pressure from the event. All events are recorded in a relational database file, which contains records of the distance of closest passage, maximum wind speeds and the direction of the maximum wind speed for over 400 locations in Australia. The database also contains records of the average recurrence interval wind speeds at those stations. The database is intended to simplify the process of identifying individual events in the catalogue for more detailed modelling to support scenario planning for emergency management, for example.

  • The 2018 Tropical Cyclone Hazard Assessment (TCHA18) provides an evaluation of the likelihood and intensity (“how big and how often”) of the occurrence of tropical cyclone winds across the Australian region, covering mainland Australia, islands and adjacent waters. It is a probabilistic evaluation of the expected maximum gust wind speeds with a range of annual exceedance probabilities (or conversely, average recurrence intervals). The assessment is derived using a statistical-parametric model developed by Geoscience Australia called the Tropical Cyclone Risk Model (TCRM). Maximum 0.2-second duration, 10-metre above ground wind speeds are calculated for Standard Australia's AS/NZS 1170.2 (2011) terrain category 2 (0.02 m roughness length) surface conditions, over a 0.02 degree grid across Australia. Maps of average recurrence interval (ARI) wind speeds of 100- and 500-year ARI are provided in a separate product suite.

  • The local wind multiplier data for Tongatapu is used to generate local wind speeds over the island of Tongatapu, Tonga.

  • Natural hazard data supports the nation to respond effectively to emergencies, reduce the threat natural hazards pose to Australia¿s national interests and address issues relating to community safety, urban development, building design, climate change and insurance. A baseline understanding of hazards, impacts and risk can help to enhance community resilience to extreme events and a changing environment. Probabilistic hazard and risk information provides planners and designers opportunity to investigate the cost and benefit of policy options to mitigate natural hazard impacts. Modelled disaster scenario information can enable disaggregation of probabilistic hazard to identify the most probable event contributing to hazard. Tropical cyclone return period wind hazard maps developed using the Tropical Cyclone Risk Model. The hazard maps are derived from a catalogue of synthetic tropical cyclone events representing 10,000 years of activity. Annual maxima are evaluated from the catalogue and used to fit a generalised extreme value distribution at each grid point. Wind multipliers are factors that transform regional wind speed to local wind speed, mathematically describing the influences of terrain, shielding and topographic effects. Local wind speeds are critical to wind-related activities that include hazard and risk assessment. The complete dataset is comprised of: - Stochastic tracks, wind fields and impact data; - Probabilistic wind speed data (hazard); - Site-exposure wind multipliers.

  • The Tropical Cyclone Scenario Selector Tool (TC SST) provides an interactive application to interrogate the stochastic event catalogue which underpins the 2018 Tropical Cyclone Hazard Assessment (TCHA18). The application allows users to search for TC events in the catalogue based on location and intensity (either TC intensity category, or maximum wind speed), visualise the tracks and the wind fields of those events, and download the data for further analysis.

  • This dynamic dataset is composed of data layers representing the potential damage arising from the impacts of Tropical Cyclone (TC) related winds on residential houses. The impacts are determined using information on the forecast track of the TC issued by the Bureau of Meteorology, nationally consistent exposure (residential building) and vulnerability (likely level of damage) information maintained by Geoscience Australia. The tracks are based on the content of Technical Bulletins issued by the Bureau of Meteorology’s Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres every 6 hours for active TCs in the Australian region. As such, information is generated intermittently, depending on the occurrence of TCs. The tracks are a forecast only, so do not include past position information of the TC. Forecasts may extend up to 120 hours (5 days) ahead of the forecast time. A wind field around each track is simulated using Geoscience Australia’s Tropical Cyclone Risk Model (TCRM, https://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/77484). This provides an estimate of the maximum gust wind speed over open, flat terrain (e.g. airports). Local effects such as topography and land cover changes are incorporated via site wind multipliers (https://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/75299), resulting in a 0.2-second, 10-m above ground level wind speed, with a spatial resolution of approximately 30 metres. The impacts are calculated using Geoscience Australia’s HazImp code (https://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/110501), which utilises the National Exposure Information System building data and a suite of wind vulnerability curves to determine the level of damage sustained by individual buildings (a damage index). The damage index values are aggregated to Australian Bureau of Statistics Statistical Area Level 1 regions, and can be assigned a qualitative damage description based on the mean damage index.