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  • This web service delivers metadata for onshore active and passive seismic surveys conducted across the Australian continent by Geoscience Australia and its collaborative partners. For active seismic this metadata includes survey header data, line location and positional information, and the energy source type and parameters used to acquire the seismic line data. For passive seismic this metadata includes information about station name and location, start and end dates, operators and instruments. The metadata are maintained in Geoscience Australia's onshore active seismic and passive seismic database, which is being added to as new surveys are undertaken. Links to datasets, reports and other publications for the seismic surveys are provided in the metadata.

  • This grid is derived from gravity observations stored in the Australian National Gravity Database (ANGD) as at February 2016 as well as data from the 2013 New South Wales Riverina gravity survey. Out of the approximately 1.8 million gravity observations 1,371,998 gravity stations in the ANGD together with 19,558 stations from the Riverina survey were used to generate this image. The grid shows isostatic residual gravity anomalies over onshore continental Australia. The data used in this grid has been acquired by the Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments, the mining and exploration industry, universities and research organisations from the 1940's to the present day. The isostatic corrections were based on the assumption that topographic loads are compensated at depth by crustal roots following the Airy-Heiskanen isostatic principle. A crustal density of 2670 kg/m3 was used for the isostatic correction, with an assumed density contrast between the crust and mantle of 400 kg/m3. An initial average depth to Moho at sea level of 37 km was used in the calculation. The isostatic corrections were then applied to the Complete Bouguer Gravity Anomaly Grid of Onshore Australia 2016 to produce the Isostatic Residual Gravity Anomaly Grid of Onshore Australia 2016.

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    Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. These line dataset from the Murrindal, Vic, 1996 VIMP Survey (GSV3060) survey were acquired in 1995 by the VIC Government, and consisted of 15589 line-kilometres of data at 200m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance. To constrain long wavelengths in the data, an independent data set, the Australia-wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS) airborne magnetic data, was used to control the base levels of the survey data. This survey data is essentially levelled to AWAGS.

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    Digital Elevation data record the terrain height variations from the processed point- or line-located data recorded during a geophysical survey. This GSQ Mt Isa West elevation grid geodetic is elevation data for the Mount Isa West, Qld, 2006. This survey was acquired under the project No. 1109 for the geological survey of QLD. The grid has a cell size of 0.00083 degrees (approximately 89m). This grid contains the ground elevation relative to the geoid for the Mount Isa West, Qld, 2006. It represents the vertical distance from a location on the Earth's surface to the geoid. The data are given in units of meters. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose.

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    The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. The terrestrial dose rate grid is derived as a linear combination of the filtered K, U and Th grids. A low pass filter is applied to this grid to generate the filtered terrestrial dose rate grid. This GSQ Mt Isa West doserate grid geodetic has a cell size of 0.00083 degrees (approximately 89m) and shows the terrestrial dose rate of the Mount Isa West, Qld, 2006. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2006 by the QLD Government, and consisted of 63015 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.

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    The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric potassium grid has a cell size of 0.00083 degrees (approximately 89m) and shows potassium element concentration of the Mount Isa West, Qld, 2006 in units of percent (or %). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2006 by the QLD Government, and consisted of 63015 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.

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    Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This GSQ Mt Isa West magnetic grid geodetic has a cell size of 0.00083 degrees (approximately 89m). The units are in nanoTesla (or nT). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2006 by the QLD Government, and consisted of 63015 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.

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    The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric thorium grid has a cell size of 0.00083 degrees (approximately 89m) and shows thorium element concentration of the Mount Isa West, Qld, 2006 in units of parts per million (or ppm). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2006 by the QLD Government, and consisted of 63015 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.

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    The Digital Elevation Model represents ground surface topography between points of known elevation. The elevation data was calculated using the altimeters and Global Positioning System (GPS) sensor used for the benefit of airborne magnetic and radiometric data on the same survey. The elevation is the height relative to the Australian Height Datum GDA94 (AUSGEOID09). The processed elevation data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. These line dataset from the Mount Isa West, Qld, 2006 survey were acquired in 2006 by the QLD Government, and consisted of 63015 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.

  • The extended abstract describes the geophysical characteristics of the granite dominated geophysical map units of the Yilgarn Craton and the relationship between their deformation and gold mineralisation. Aeromagnetic data are not able to distinguish the five main granite geochemical groups. Gamma-ray spectromatric data provide some distinctin of the geochemical groups but their use is restricted to limited areas of outcrop. Faults host much gold but the majority of these structures are barren and spatial associations have been difficult to establish. Shear zones are irregularly distributed across the craton. Abundant intersecting shear zones, that transect both granite and greenstone, define a 200 km wide, north-trending corridor, with distinctive rhomboid to sigmoidal internal geometry. Greenstones in the corridor are extensively disrupded and strongly aligned with adjacent shear zones. This corridor correlates with the the region of highest gold endowment for the Yilgarn Craton and large deposits are spatially associated with bends and intersections of the shear zones. By contrast, shear zones are sparse in the Yalgoo Dome area in the north west of the Yilgarn Craton. The crustal architecture of this area is dominated by large ovoid bodies of granite. Adjacent greesntones are not regionally alligned, nor particularly disrupted internally, and gold endowment is low. These aparent contrasting structural styles and corresponding differences in gold endowment can be similarly applied to the Superior Province of Canada (Abatibi Belt, abundant intersecting shear zones, strongly aligned greenstone, and high gold endowment) and Australia's Pilbara Craton (few shear zones, oviod granite geometry dominant with little regional alignment of greenstone and low gold endowment).