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  • This animation shows how Airborne Electromagnetic Surveys Work. It is part of a series of Field Activity Technique Engagement Animations. The target audience are the communities that are impacted by our data acquisition activities. There is no sound or voice over. The 2D animations include a simplified view of what AEM equipment looks like, what the equipment measures and how the survey works.

  • <div>Geoscience Australia’s Exploring for the Future program provides precompetitive information to inform decision-making by government, community and industry on the sustainable development of Australia's mineral, energy and groundwater resources. By gathering, analysing and interpreting new and existing precompetitive geoscience data and knowledge, we are building a national picture of Australia’s geology and resource potential. This leads to a strong economy, resilient society and sustainable environment for the benefit of all Australians. This includes supporting Australia’s transition to net zero emissions, strong, sustainable resources and agriculture sectors, and economic opportunities and social benefits for Australia’s regional and remote communities. The Exploring for the Future program, which commenced in 2016, is an eight year, $225m investment by the Australian Government.</div><div><br></div><div>As part of Exploring for the Future (EFTF) program with contributions from the Geological Survey of Queensland, long-period magnetotelluric (MT) data for the Australian Lithospheric Architecture Magnetotelluric Project (AusLAMP) were collected using Geoscience Australia's LEMI-424 instruments on a half-degree grid across northern and western Queensland from April 2021 to November 2022. This survey aims to map the electrical resistivity structures in the region. The processed data and 3D resistivity model have been released (https://dx.doi.org/10.26186/148633).&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>This data release contains site locations and acquired time series data at each site in two formats:</div><div>1. MTH5, a hierarchical data format. The open-source MTH5 Python package (https://github.com/kujaku11/mth5) was used to convert the recorded LEMI data into MTH5 format.</div><div>2. Text file (*.TXT). This is the original format recorded by the LEMI-424 data logger.</div><div><br></div><div>We acknowledge the traditional landowners, private landholders and national park authorities within the survey region, without whose cooperation these data could not have been collected.</div><div><br></div><div><strong>Data is available on request from clientservices@ga.gov.au - Quote eCat# 148978</strong></div><div><br></div>

  • This animation shows how Magnetotelluric (MT) Surveys Work. It is part of a series of Field Activity Technique Engagement Animations. The target audience are the communities that are impacted by our data acquisition activities. There is no sound or voice over. The 2D animation includes a simplified view of what magnetotelluric (MT) stations and equipment looks like what the equipment measures and how the survey works.

  • We present a 3‐D inversion of magnetotelluric data acquired along a 340‐km transect in Central Australia. The results are interpreted with a coincident deep crustal seismic reflection survey and magnetic inversion. The profile crosses three Paleoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic basement provinces, the Davenport, Aileron, and Warumpi Provinces, which are overlain by remnants of the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian Centralian Surperbasin, the Georgina and Amadeus Basins, and the Irindina Province. The inversion shows conductors near the base of the Irindina Province that connect to moderately conductive pathways from 50‐km depth and to off‐profile conductors at shallower depths. The shallow conductors may reflect anisotropic resistivity and are interpreted as sulfide minerals in fractures and faults near the base of the Irindina Province. Beneath the Amadeus Basin, and in the Aileron Province, there are two conductors associated strong magnetic susceptibilities from inversions, suggesting they are caused by magnetic, conductive minerals such as magnetite or pyrrhotite. Beneath the Davenport Province, the inversion images a conductive layer from ∼15‐ to 40‐km depth that is associated with elevated magnetic susceptibility and high seismic reflectivity. The margins between the different basement provinces from previous seismic interpretations are evident in the resistivity model. The positioning and geometry of the southern margin of the crustal conductor beneath the Davenport Province supports the positioning of the south dipping Atuckera Fault as interpreted on the seismic data. Likewise, the interpreted north dipping margin between the Warumpi and Aileron Province is imaged as a transition from resistive to conductive crust, with a steeply north dipping geometry.

  • The Australian Lithospheric Architecture Magnetotelluric Project (AusLAMP) aims to collect long period magnetotelluric data on a half degree (~55 km) grid across the Australian continent. New data have recently been collected in New South Wales under a National Collaborative Framework agreement between Geoscience Australia and the Geological Survey of New South Wales. This data release contains a preferred resistivity model and associated inversion files for southeast Australia using data from AusLAMP Victoria (Duan & Kyi, 2018), far west NSW (Robertson et al. 2016) and from the rest of New South Wales up to August 2019 (Kyi et al 2020). The original work behind this model can be cited through the following paper which contains discussion on model development and its significance for tectonic evolution and metallogenic potential: Kirkby, A., Musgrave, R.J., Czarnota, K., Doublier, M.P., Duan, J., Cayley, R.A., Kyi, D., 2020. Lithospheric architecture of a Phanerozoic orogen from magnetotellurics: AusLAMP in the Tasmanides, southeast Australia. Tectonophysics, v. 793, 228560.

  • This animation shows how Airborne Electromagnetic Surveys Work, when conducted by a rotary wing (helicopter) aircraft. It is part of a series of Field Activity Technique Engagement Animations. The target audience are the communities that are impacted by our data acquisition activities. There is no sound or voice over. The 2D animation includes a simplified view of what AEM equipment looks like, what the equipment measures and how the survey works.