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  • This Galilee Basin dataset contains descriptive attribute information for the areas bounded by the relevant spatial groundwater feature in the associated Hydrogeology Index map. Descriptive topics are grouped into the following themes: Location and administration; Demographics; Physical geography; Surface water; Geology; Hydrogeology; Groundwater; Groundwater management and use; Environment; Land use and industry types; and Scientific stimulus. This Galilee Basin dataset contains descriptive attribute information for the areas bounded by the relevant spatial groundwater feature in the associated Hydrogeology Index map. Descriptive topics are grouped into the following themes: Location and administration; Demographics; Physical geography; Surface water; Geology; Hydrogeology; Groundwater; Groundwater management and use; Environment; Land use and industry types; and Scientific stimulus. The Galilee Basin is a large intracratonic sedimentary basin in central Queensland. The basin contains a variably thick sequence of Late Carboniferous to Middle Triassic clastic sedimentary rocks dominated by laterally extensive sandstone, mudstone and coal. These rocks were mostly deposited in non-marine environments (rivers, swamps and lakes), although there is minor evidence for marginal marine settings such as deltas and estuaries. Sedimentation did not occur continuously across the approximately 90 million year history of basin development, and intervals of episodic compression, uplift and erosion were marked by distinct depositional breaks. Over much of the surface area of the Galilee Basin the main aquifers targeted for groundwater extraction occur in the younger rocks and sediments that overlie the deeper sequence of the Galilee Basin. The primary aquifers that supply groundwater in this region are those of the Eromanga Basin, as well as more localised deposits of Cenozoic alluvium. However, in the central-east and north-east of the Galilee Basin, the Carboniferous to Triassic rocks occur at or close to surface and several aquifer units supply significant volumes of groundwater to support pastoral and town water supplies, as well as being the water source for several spring complexes. The three main groundwater systems identified in the Galilee Basin occur in the 1. Clematis Group aquifer, 2. partial aquifer of the upper Permian coal measures (including the Betts Creek beds and Colinlea Sandstone), and 3. aquifers of the basal Joe Joe Group. The main hydrogeological units that confine regional groundwater flow in the Galilee Basin are (from upper- to lower-most) the Moolayember Formation, Rewan Formation, Jochmus Formation and Jericho Formation. However, some bores may tap local groundwater resources within these regional aquitards in areas where they outcrop or occur close to surface. Such areas of localised partial aquifer potential may be due in part to enhanced groundwater storage due to weathering and fracturing.

  • Groundwater is an essential part of Darwin’s water supply mix, and is sourced from Howard East Borefield (HEB) and McMinns Borefield in the Koolpinyah Dolostone Aquifer (KDA), east of Darwin. Previous work suggested that electrical conductivity anomalies observed in airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data within 8 km of HEB may be caused by saline groundwater within the KDA that is separated from HEB by geological features that effectively compartmentalise the aquifer. Nevertheless, concerns grew that increased groundwater use may result in migration of saline groundwater towards HEB, which could compromise the groundwater resource. We collected hydrochemistry, including isotopes, time-series groundwater salinity and AEM data to better understand the complexities of the KDA. These data are presented here, along with a hydrodynamic analysis undertaken by the Northern Territory Department of Environment and Natural Resources, which shows that drawdown is occurring more rapidly from the NE of HEB and that dykes ~8 km NE of HEB act as barriers to groundwater flow. We show that groundwater sampled on the NE side of these dykes has a seawater composition. We use new AEM data to map the elevation of the top of unweathered dyke material and to characterise AEM conductors proximal to HEB. Our mapping reveals that the top of the unweathered portion of these dykes is commonly below sea level. We also show that AEM conductors proximal to HEB are more likely mineralised clays than saline groundwater within the aquifer. Drilling is required to confirm these results. Our findings contribute to building a robust conceptual understanding of the KDA and will inform future modelling of the groundwater system. <b>Citation:</b> Haiblen, A.M., Symington, N.J., Woltmann, M.J., Ray, A., Gow, L.J., Leplastrier, A. and McGrath, E.S.B., 2020. A multifaceted approach to investigating hydrogeological complexities in the Koolpinyah Dolostone Aquifer, Howard East, Northern Territory. In: Czarnota, K., Roach, I., Abbott, S., Haynes, M., Kositcin, N., Ray, A. and Slatter, E. (eds.) Exploring for the Future: Extended Abstracts, Geoscience Australia, Canberra, 1–4.

  • The Exploring for the Future Southern Stuart Corridor Groundwater Project undertook extensive multidisciplinary geoscientific investigations across four study areas and six Indigenous communities in central Australia to better understand and characterise groundwater resources. The project was developed to support improvements in water resilience for communities and future agricultural developments in the region. Geoscience Australia collected 9800 line kilometres of airborne electromagnetic data, drilled and installed 15 new monitoring bores, acquired 78 surface nuclear magnetic resonance soundings, recorded downhole geophysical data and groundwater level measurements from >50 bores, and completed hydrochemical analysis of 75 samples. Integration of these datasets provided insights into recharge areas and rates, and potential for managed aquifer recharge. The project also improved our understanding of the geological systems hosting groundwater and interconnections between systems. Potential new groundwater supplies, enhanced understanding of groundwater processes and improved geological models will assist water agencies to better manage groundwater resources across the region. <b>Citation:</b> Hostetler, S., Slatter, E., McPherson, A.A., Tan, K.P., McInnes, D. J., Wischusen, J.D.H. and Ellis, J.H., 2020. A multidisciplinary geoscientific approach to support water resilience in communities in Central Australia. In: Czarnota, K., Roach, I., Abbott, S., Haynes, M., Kositcin, N., Ray, A. and Slatter, E. (eds.) Exploring for the Future: Extended Abstracts, Geoscience Australia, Canberra, 1–4.

  • Publicly available groundwater data have been compiled to provide a common information base to inform environmental, resource development and regulatory decisions in the Adavale Basin region. This web service summarises salinity and water levels for the Adavale Basin located within the Adavale Basin region.

  • Publicly available groundwater data have been compiled to provide a common information base to inform environmental, resource development and regulatory decisions in the Galilee Basin region. This web service summarises salinity, water levels, resource size, potential aquifer yield and surface water–groundwater interactions for the Galilee Basin located within the Galilee Basin region.

  • Christmas Island is an Australian Territory located in the Indian Ocean about 2600 km north-west of Perth and 350 km southwest of Java. The Island is approximately 135 km2 in size and has a population of over 1800 residents. Although the average yearly rainfall is approximately 2000 mm/year, the Island has experienced periodic droughts that have threatened water supplies. Because of the highly porous rocks of the island, no permanent surface water bodies exist, and all fresh water is sourced from natural springs and caves. Currently, the Island¿s water supply is treated and stored in above-ground tanks, however, this only provides sufficient storage for a two-day supply if the underground water (groundwater) dries up or is contaminated. There is clearly a need for greater water security, although further investigations are required. An initial scoping study by Geoscience Australia confirmed that Christmas Island¿s geology and hydrogeology is complex and poorly understood. The Island is known for its phosphate-rich materials which have been mined since 1899. The Island¿s groundwater system is likely to be highly compartmentalized, with the potential for groundwater supplies to be identified in several locations across the Island. Geoscience Australia has recommended a second phase of investigations, focusing on 3-dimensional mapping of the Island using below ground imaging technologies (airborne electromagnetics and magnetics). These technologies, complemented by drilling and water sampling, will be used to identify and assess new potential underground water resources across the Island. Results from the new study will: - Provide critical new data and knowledge to enhance water security for the Island;. - Underpin development of a new economic planning framework; - Inform sustainable land management practices; and - Provide new data on the distribution of phosphate deposits.

  • Publicly available groundwater data have been compiled to provide a common information base to inform environmental, resource development and regulatory decisions in the Cooper Basin region. This web service summarises salinity, water levels, resource size, potential aquifer yield and surface water–groundwater interactions for the Lake Eyre Basin located within the Cooper Basin region.

  • Geoscience Australia commissioned reprocessing of selected legacy 2D seismic data in the East Kimberley, onshore Bonaparte Basin as part of the Exploring for the Future (EFTF) program. Reprocessing of these data occurred between September 2017 and May 2018. Exploring for the Future (<a href="https://www.ga.gov.au/eftf/">https://www.ga.gov.au/eftf</a>) was a $100.5 million four-year (2016-20), Australian Government-funded program to provide a holistic picture of the potential mineral, energy and groundwater resources in northern Australia. The program has delivered new geoscience data, knowledge and decision support tools to support increased industry investment and sustainable economic development across the north. Groundwater is a critical resource that accounts for most water used across northern Australia. The groundwater component of the EFTF program focused on addressing groundwater resource knowledge gaps, to support future opportunities for economic development via irrigated agriculture, extractive industries and increased security of community water supplies. Through collaboration with State and Territory partners, the program undertook targeted regional investigations of groundwater systems and assessments of groundwater potential more broadly across the region. The program's activities, implemented by Geoscience Australia, involved application of innovative geoscience tools to collect, integrate and analyse a range of data. It includes geological and hydrogeological data, airborne and ground-based geophysical and hydrogeochemical surveys, remote sensing data as well as stratigraphic drilling. The new data and better understanding of groundwater systems also helps inform decision making about groundwater use to protect environmental and cultural assets. These outcomes strengthen investor confidence in resources and agricultural projects by de-risking groundwater in northern Australia. The package contains reprocessed data from ten surveys acquired between 1980 and 1997. In total 53 lines were reprocessed covering a fold area of approximately 618.9 line kilometres, with the objective to produce a modern industry standard 2D land seismic reflection dataset where possible from a selection of multiple legacy 2D data. The purpose of the reprocessing was twofold: 1) To image the near surface structural and stratigraphic configuration for linking to AEM data that is available in the Bonaparte Basin; and 2) To image the structure and stratigraphic architecture of the Paleozoic Bonaparte Basin. The dataset exhibits significant improvements in stack response in most of the reprocessed lines when final and legacy stacks were compared, especially in the shallow section. Optimum results were obtained from the noise attenuation workflows. A minimum processing flow was applied to BWA80, BWA81, and line BNT87-404 lines to avoid any signal leakage throughout the processing. Final data were delivered as minimum phase (care should be taken not to interpret zero crossings as geological boundaries), and final velocities produced a good match with the well checkshot velocities. The processing report from Down Under Geophysics is available for download with this release. Raw and processed data are available on request from <a href="mailto:clientservices@ga.gov.au&body=Ref: eCat 135578">clientservices@ga.gov.au</a> - Quote eCat# 135578. Processed stack SEG-Y files and ancillary data are available for download from this web page.

  • Publicly available groundwater data have been compiled to provide a common information base to inform environmental, resource development and regulatory decisions in the Adavale Basin region. This data guide gives examples of how these data can be used. The data package included with this data guide captures existing knowledge of Galilee Basin aquifers in the Adavale Basin region and their properties, including salinity, water levels, resource size, potential aquifer yield and surface water interactions. The methods to derive these data for all Galilee Basin aquifers in the Adavale Basin region are outlined in the associated metadata files. These are described in groundwater conceptual models (Gouramanis et al., 2023). The Galilee Basin overlying the Adavale Basin includes 3 broadly defined aquifer intervals: from deepest to shallowest, these are the Joe Joe Group, Betts Creek beds and Clematis aquifers. Compiled data have been assigned to these intervals and used to characterise groundwater systems at the basin scale. The data are compiled for a point-in-time to inform decisions on potential resource developments in the Basin. The available historical groundwater data can be used to assess the potential effects on groundwater. The data can also be used for other purposes, such as exploring unallocated groundwater resource potential. Data to January 2022 are used for this compilation.

  • This South Australian Gulf and Yorke Cenozoic Basins dataset contains descriptive attribute information for the areas bounded by the relevant spatial groundwater feature in the associated Hydrogeology Index map. Descriptive topics are grouped into the following themes: Location and administration; Demographics; Physical geography; Surface water; Geology; Hydrogeology; Groundwater; Groundwater management and use; Environment; Land use and industry types; and Scientific stimulus. The South Australian Gulf and Yorke Cenozoic basins consist of eleven separate basins with similar sediments. These relatively small to moderate-sized basins overlies older rocks from the Permian, Cambrian, or Precambrian periods and are often bounded by north-trending faults or basement highs. The largest basins, Torrens, Pirie, and Saint Vincent, share boundaries. The Torrens and Pirie basins are fault-bounded structural depressions linked to the Torrens Hinge Zone, while the Saint Vincent basin is a fault-bounded intra-cratonic graben. Smaller isolated basins include Carribie and Para Wurlie near the Yorke Peninsula, and Willochra and Walloway in the southern Flinders Ranges. The Barossa Basin, Hindmarsh Tiers, Myponga, and Meadows basins are in the Adelaide region. These basins resulted from tectonic movements during the Eocene Australian-Antarctic separation, with many forming in the late Oligocene. Sediment deposition occurred during the Oligocene to Holocene, with various environments influenced by marine transgressions and regressions. The well-studied Saint Vincent Basin contains diverse sediments deposited in fluvial, alluvial, deltaic, swamp, marine, littoral, beach, and colluvial settings, with over 30 major shoreline migrations. Eocene deposition formed fluvio-deltaic lignite and sand deposits, before transitioning to deeper marine settings. The Oligocene and Miocene saw limestone, calcarenite, and clay deposition, overlain by Pliocene marine sands and limestones. The uppermost sequences include interbedded Pliocene to Pleistocene limestone, sand, gravel, and clay, as well as Pleistocene clay with minor sand lenses, and Holocene to modern coastal deposits. The sediment thickness varies from less than 50 m to approximately 600 m, with the Saint Vincent Basin having the most substantial infill. Some basins were previously connected to the Saint Vincent Basin's marine depositional systems but later separated due to tectonic movements.