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    Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This Magnetic Anomaly Map of Australia, Seventh Edition, 2019 TMI Greyscale image is a greyscale image of the TMI grid of the Magnetic Anomaly Map of Australia, Seventh Edition, 2019. The 2019 Total magnetic Intensity (TMI) grid of Australia has a grid cell size of ~3 seconds of arc (approximately 80 m). This grid only includes airborne-derived TMI data for onshore and near-offshore continental areas. Since the sixth edition was released in 2015, data from 234 new surveys have been added to the database, acquired mainly by the State and Territory Geological Surveys. The new grid was derived from a re-levelling of the national magnetic grid database. The survey grids were levelled to each other, and to the Australia Wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS), which serves as a baseline to constrain long wavelengths in the final grid. It is estimated that 33 500 000 line-kilometres of survey data were acquired to produce the 2019 grid data, about 2 000 000 line-kilometres more than for the previous edition. The grid used to produce this greyscale image has a cell size of 0.00083 degrees (approximately 80m). This greyscale image shows the magnetic response of subsurface features with contrasting magnetic susceptibilities. The image can also be used to locate structural features such as dykes.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric potassium grid has a cell size of 0.000833 degrees (approximately 90m) and shows potassium element concentration of the Bowen-Surat South, Qld, 2006 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2006 by the Qld Government, and consisted of 153795 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric potassium grid has a cell size of 0.004 degrees (approximately 400m) and shows potassium element concentration of the Murray Basin (Hay, Narrandera, Deniliquin, Jerilderie), NSW, 1987 (GSV0377) survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1988 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 55220 line-kilometres of data at 1500m line spacing and 150m terrain clearance.

  • Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This magnetic grid has a cell size of 0.000417 degrees (approximately 40m). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1999 by the TAS Government, and consisted of 39404 line-kilometres of data at 200m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.

  • Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This magnetic grid has a cell size of 0.002 degrees (approximately 210m). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in UNKNOWN by the WA Government, and consisted of UNKNOWN line-kilometres of data at 100m line spacing and 50m terrain clearance.

  • The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric thorium grid has a cell size of 0.000833 degrees (approximately 90m) and shows thorium element concentration of the Frome, SA, Broken Hill Exploration Initiative, 1995 survey. The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1995 by the SA Government, and consisted of 68300 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.

  • Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This magnetic grid has a cell size of 0.004167 degrees (approximately 420m). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in UNKNOWN by the UNKNOWN Government, and consisted of UNKNOWN line-kilometres of data at 20000m line spacing and UNKNOWNm terrain clearance.

  • Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This magnetic grid has a cell size of 0.000833 degrees (approximately 90m). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1995 by the SA Government, and consisted of 68300 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.

  • Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This magnetic grid has a cell size of 0.001 degrees (approximately 100m). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1994 by the SA, VIC Government, and consisted of 45227.5 line-kilometres of data at 500m line spacing and 130m terrain clearance.

  • Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This magnetic grid has a cell size of 0.001 degrees (approximately 110m). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 1995 by the QLD Government, and consisted of 156230 line-kilometres of data at 400m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance.