From 1 - 10 / 159
  • The London Bridge Limestone has been traced along its strike from a point five miles south-south-east of Queanbeyan to a point three miles south-east of Bredbo, a distance of forty miles. At London Bridge this formation attains its greatest development and a large-scale geological map of this area has been prepared. Fossil collections have been made from localities along this formation and the fauna has been examined. A description of the coral Pycnostylus ? sp. nov. is given. The stratigraphical position of this formation has been placed within the Wenlock Epoch, possibly within the Lower Wenlock.

  • The features of the single-point resistance log, obtained in A.A.O. No. 2 Bore, Roma, are described. Single-point resistance, self-potential and geological logs of the lower section of the boreholes are shown. The results indicate that electrical logging can be effectively used for correlation problems and that salt water sands in the reservoir rocks can be detected with reasonable certainty.

  • This report is concerned with the bryozoan faunas of the Nura Nura limestone and the Noonkanbah series. The bryozoan faunas from individual localities and the distribution of species occurring in areas other than the Kimberley district are listed. Other aspects of the faunas are discussed. This discussion includes a general consideration of the facies, a description of the faunas of the Nura Nura Limestone, and a comparison with other Permian faunas. A supplementary list of the bryozoan faunas of localities in the Noonkanbah series represented by the Teichert's specimens is included.

  • This prospect is situated on the northern bank of the East Finniss River, approximately 500 yards north-east of Brown's workings and 800 yards south-west of White's workings. About 50 years ago the area was prospected for copper and abandoned after several costeans had been dug. A small radiometric anomaly was discovered in 1950 and the area was radiometrically contoured. A geological map on a scale of 20 feet to one inch was prepared by the writer during the 1951 field season, and accompanies this report (Plate 1). [Geology, structure, mineralization, workings, diamond drilling, and prospecting recommendations are discussed].

  • Part of 4th March, as well as 5th March, were spent at Carcoar, New South Wales, in inspecting the radioactive deposits in that locality and in observing the use of a helicopter, loaned by the R.A.A.F., as a means of prospecting for radioactive minerals. The writer was accompanied by R.S. Matheson of the Geological Section of the Bureau, and J. Daly and a party of geophysicists were also present at Carcoar at the time of this inspection. The present note is supplementary to the report by R.S. Matheson (1952/65) which includes plans of the Carcoar area and the radioactive deposits, and should be read in conjunction with that report.

  • An area of approximately 32 square miles in the vicinity of Rye Park has been mapped in greater detail than that of previous regional surveys. Three possible tungsten-bearing areas have been delineated as warranting magnetometric and plane-table surveys. An extension of each of these three areas is indicated. Attention is drawn to copper, tin, silver, lead, and zinc mineralisation of the area, and it is considered that there are possibilities of finding payable orebodies containing these metals.

  • During 1951 three separate sets of La Cour pattern Quartz Horizontal Magnetometers were received from the Danish Meteorological Institute. These instruments which are only semi-absolute, were calibrated at the Rude Skov Magnetic Observatory against the standard adopted by that observatory. As the Australian observatories are based on the International Magnetic Standard housed at Cheltenham near Washington, U.S.A. (hereinafter referred to as I.M.S.) it was decided to compare them against the Toolangi magnetometer as soon as possible after their arrival in Australia. Moreover, as the stability of these instruments depends on the torsion properties of a quartz fibre and on the magnetic moment of a magnet, regular comparisons should be made with an absolute magnetometer and the results used to control drift that might occur. The comparisons made immediately after the arrival of the instruments in Australia would thus constitute a starting point in the future control of the Q.H.Ms. [An account is given of work done between 1951 and 1952. Results are appended.]

  • Results are given of a geophysical test survey made at three localities on the Newcastle coalfield in August, 1952, to determine whether intrusive doleritic dykes could be located by the magnetic method. Knowledge of the position of the dykes would assist in planning the lay-out of underground workings and of surface roads. The results showed only slight variations of the magnetic field, but some weak anomalies of less than 100 gammas were recorded. The position of these anomalies coincides with the inferred position of the basic dykes near the surface. The variation in the shape of anomalies suggests non-uniformity of the magnetic properties and shape of the dykes. The magnetic method might be helpful in determining the position and extent of the dykes beyond the areas where they are known, but supporting evidence from other geophysical methods such as the gravity of electric resistivity methods may be needed to verify the magnetic results.

  • Investigations into the geological structure of the immediate area of the mine are not complete. Various structural controls have been recognised in the Main Lode. The South Lode is mostly hidden under alluvium, but similar structures trend across the area. The possibility of a repetition copper lode in the South Lode area is hopeful. [The characteristics of the lodes and their ore reserves are discussed].

  • This report deals with the results of 22,355 ft. of scout boring over an area of approximately 50 square miles on the western flank of the Muswellbrook (N.S.W.) Anticline. A traverse of overlapping bore-holes, located between the outcrops of the Upper Marine Series (Mulbring Beds) in the east and of the Triassic sediments in the west; provided a more complete section of the Upper Coal Measures in this area than has been previously available. Some 46 coal seams were encountered and tentatively numbered for correlation. Some of the coal seams exhibit very good qualities, but none could be classed as a good gas or coking coal. Igneous intrusions are numerous and of a fairly wide vertical and areal extent; their influence on the associated coal seams is generally destructive. The results of the above boring may be regarded as a basis, for any detailed future underground and/or open-cut mining investigations. No attempt was made to estimate coal reserves of any kind.