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  • 25% coverage east & west corners F54/B1-73 Contour interval: 10

  • Development work and exploratory diamond drilling at the Adelaide River Uranium Mine showed the presence of an ore shot, known as the Black Lode, which contained about 70 tons per foot depth of ore averaging about 0,5% U308. The shoot was developed to a depth of 200 feet. Most of the developed ore has been stoped and about 3,500 tons of ore from the mine have been treated at Rum Jungle. About 1,500 tons of ore remain broken in stopes but there are no proved ore reserves. The mineralization is localized by the intersection of shears and beds of sandstone. The evidence suggests that the Black Lode ore shoot continues in depth and that a repetition of the ore shoot is possible. Diamond drilling and development work are recommended.

  • Legacy product - no abstract available

  • The R502 series of maps has been replaced by the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS). The R502 series consists of 542 map sheets and covers Australia at a scale of 1:250,000. It was compiled from aerial photography, but only about one quarter of the series was contoured. The standard sheet size is 1 degree of latitude by 1.5 degrees of longitude. Transverse Mercator map projection and Clark 1858 datum were used. Coverage of the country was completed in 1968.

  • Legacy product - no abstract available

  • These documents have been scanned by the GA Library. Please refer to the document for contents.

  • These documents have been scanned by the GA Library. Please refer to the document for contents.

  • The Bulletin describes and figures Bryozoa collected from three Permian formations in the West Kimberley district of Western Australia: the Nura Nura member of the Poole Sandstone, the Noonkanbah Formation, and the lower part of the Liveringa Group. Seventy-nine species are recorded. Forty-two of them are new species; and three new genera (Evactinostella, Etherella, and Liguloclerna) and a new family have been erected in the Cyclostomata. The facies relationships of the species show that habitat is an important factor in correlation. Ramose zoaria appear to be more adaptable than other forms, and some species are almost ubiquitous. The Nura Nura fauna may be correlated with the Callytharra Limestone of the Carnarvon Basin and possibly with the Lower Productus Limestone of the Salt Range of India. Many of the Nura Nura species are long-ranging. The Noonkanbah species are, on the whole, more restricted: they can be correlated, within Australia, with the Wandagee Formation and Baker Formation of the Carnarvon Basin. Outside Australia, the fauna shows resemblances to those of the Bitaoeni and Basleo Beds of Timor and an Artinskian fauna from Vancouver Island; some Fenestel1idae resemble Lower Permian species described from the Urals.