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  • This web service delivers metadata for onshore active and passive seismic surveys conducted across the Australian continent by Geoscience Australia and its collaborative partners. For active seismic this metadata includes survey header data, line location and positional information, and the energy source type and parameters used to acquire the seismic line data. For passive seismic this metadata includes information about station name and location, start and end dates, operators and instruments. The metadata are maintained in Geoscience Australia's onshore active seismic and passive seismic database, which is being added to as new surveys are undertaken. Links to datasets, reports and other publications for the seismic surveys are provided in the metadata.

  • This grid is derived from gravity observations stored in the Australian National Gravity Database (ANGD) as at February 2016 as well as data from the 2013 New South Wales Riverina gravity survey. Out of the approximately 1.8 million gravity observations 1,371,998 gravity stations in the ANGD together with 19,558 stations from the Riverina survey were used to generate this image. The grid shows isostatic residual gravity anomalies over onshore continental Australia. The data used in this grid has been acquired by the Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments, the mining and exploration industry, universities and research organisations from the 1940's to the present day. The isostatic corrections were based on the assumption that topographic loads are compensated at depth by crustal roots following the Airy-Heiskanen isostatic principle. A crustal density of 2670 kg/m3 was used for the isostatic correction, with an assumed density contrast between the crust and mantle of 400 kg/m3. An initial average depth to Moho at sea level of 37 km was used in the calculation. The isostatic corrections were then applied to the Complete Bouguer Gravity Anomaly Grid of Onshore Australia 2016 to produce the Isostatic Residual Gravity Anomaly Grid of Onshore Australia 2016.

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    Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. These line dataset from the Murrindal, Vic, 1996 VIMP Survey (GSV3060) survey were acquired in 1995 by the VIC Government, and consisted of 15589 line-kilometres of data at 200m line spacing and 80m terrain clearance. To constrain long wavelengths in the data, an independent data set, the Australia-wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS) airborne magnetic data, was used to control the base levels of the survey data. This survey data is essentially levelled to AWAGS.

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    Digital Elevation data record the terrain height variations from the processed point- or line-located data recorded during a geophysical survey. This Billabong Creek elevation grid geodetic is elevation data for the SMMSP - MagSpec - Billabong Creek, NSW, 2001. This survey was acquired under the project No. 908 for the geological survey of NSW. The grid has a cell size of 0.00021 degrees (approximately 21m). This grid contains the ground elevation relative to the geoid for the SMMSP - MagSpec - Billabong Creek, NSW, 2001. It represents the vertical distance from a location on the Earth's surface to the geoid. The data are given in units of meters. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose.

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    The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric potassium grid has a cell size of 0.00021 degrees (approximately 21m) and shows potassium element concentration of the SMMSP - MagSpec - Billabong Creek, NSW, 2001 in units of percent (or %). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2001 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 32065 line-kilometres of data at 100m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance.

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    Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This Billabong Creek tmi grid geodetic has a cell size of 0.00021 degrees (approximately 21m). The units are in nanoTesla (or nT). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2001 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 32065 line-kilometres of data at 100m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance.

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    The radiometric, or gamma-ray spectrometric method, measures the natural variations in the gamma-rays detected near the Earth's surface as the result of the natural radioactive decay of potassium (K), uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The data collected are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This radiometric thorium grid has a cell size of 0.00021 degrees (approximately 21m) and shows thorium element concentration of the SMMSP - MagSpec - Billabong Creek, NSW, 2001 in units of parts per million (or ppm). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2001 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 32065 line-kilometres of data at 100m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance.

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    Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. . This Billabong Creek tmi rtp 1vd grid geodetic is the first vertical derivative of the TMI RTP grid of the SMMSP - MagSpec - Billabong Creek, NSW, 2001 survey. This grid has a cell size of 0.00021 degrees (approximately 21m) , and given in units of nT per metre (nT/m). The data used to produce the TMI grid was acquired in 2001 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 32065 line-kilometres of data at 100m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance. The data has had a variable reduction to the pole applied to centre the magnetic anomaly over the magnetised body. The VRTP processing followed a differential reduction to pole calculation up to 5th order polynomial. Magnetic inclination and declination were derived from the IGRF-11 geomagnetic reference model using a data representative date and elevation representative of the survey. A first vertical derivative was calculated by applying a fast Fourier transform (FFT) process to the TMI RTP grid of the SMMSP - MagSpec - Billabong Creek, NSW, 2001 survey to produce this grid. This grid was calculated using an algorithm from the INTREPID Geophysics software package. This grid shows the magnetic response of subsurface features with contrasting magnetic susceptibilities. The grid can also be used to locate structural features such as dykes.

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    Total magnetic intensity (TMI) data measures variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field caused by the contrasting content of rock-forming minerals in the Earth crust. Magnetic anomalies can be either positive (field stronger than normal) or negative (field weaker) depending on the susceptibility of the rock. The data are processed via standard methods to ensure the response recorded is that due only to the rocks in the ground. The results produce datasets that can be interpreted to reveal the geological structure of the sub-surface. The processed data is checked for quality by GA geophysicists to ensure that the final data released by GA are fit-for-purpose. This magnetic grid has a cell size of 0.00021 degrees (approximately 21m).The data are in nanoTesla (or nT). The data used to produce this grid was acquired in 2001 by the NSW Government, and consisted of 32065 line-kilometres of data at 100m line spacing and 60m terrain clearance. The data has had a variable reduction to the pole applied to centre the magnetic anomaly over the magnetised body. The VRTP processing followed a differential reduction to pole calculation up to 5th order polynomial. Magnetic inclination and declination were derived from the IGRF-11 geomagnetic reference model using a data representative date and elevation representative of the survey.