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  • The discovery of the radioactive minerals carnotite and torbernite, in the vicinity of Rum jungle, was reported by Mr. Jack White on the 7th September 1949 in a letter to the Director of Mines, Alice Springs. Officers of the Department of Mines, Alice Springs confirmed his conclusions. The area was visited by J. Daly, J.F. Ivanac of the Bureau of Mineral Resources, and M. Sneddon of the Mines Department, Alice Springs late in September. They suggested that detailed geophysical and geological work should be carried out. H.J. Ward and G.F. Joklik made a detailed geological investigation in October and prepared a map which covers an area approximately half a mile by a quarter of a mile. A general reconnaissance of the country in the vicinity of Rum Jungle was also carried out. In conjunction with the geological work D.F. Dyson made a Geiger-Muller survey of the torbernite-carnotite deposit. An account of this investigation and its findings is set down in this report.

  • This report contains the results of a brief examination carried out from 1st to 7th October 1950 at Maranboy, Northern Territory, by the writer and Dr. J. Sleis, Geologist, who were assisted by the Inspector of Mines, Mr. W.A. McDonald. The purpose of this examination was to obtain the necessary data for a preliminary assessment of the tinfield based on the ore developed and won to date.

  • During May, 1950, a sample of granitic material was obtained from a dump on the Sunnyside goldfield, and showing a few flakes of a green mineral similar in appearance to torbernite, was forwarded to the Department of Mines, Melbourne, by a miner working on that field. The Mines department tested the mineral and proved that it was uranium-bearing, and submitted a sample to the Bureau to test for radioactivity. After confirmation of the presence of radioactivity in the sample by laboratory tests, a brief visit was paid to the field by a party from the Geophysical Section. One day was spent for conducting tests on the field. The opportunity was taken of visiting the Maude and Yellow Girl mine, and testing ores and concentrates for radioactivity.

  • Tamborine Mountain lies about 35 miles south-south-east from Brisbane. Laterite occurs in the north-western portion of the mountain and in general occupies the more elevated areas. The bauxite deposits have been known for many years and have been exploited as a source of road metal and more recently for the manufacture of aluminium sulphate. The occurrences have been described briefly by Ball (1940), Curteis (1942), and Connah (1950). Mr. W.S. Curteis conducted testing operations by shaft-sinking on behalf of Messrs. Sulphates Limited. The results of this work have been made available to the writer by the Company and have been used herein. During June 1950 the writer accompanied Mr. T.H. Connah to Tamborine Mountain during a very short visit, and again examined the area in November. The geology of the area, bauxite, and bauxite reserves at Tamborine Mountain are described in this report.

  • The core sample of grey marl was collected from the No. 2 Bore, Parish of Glencoe South, and came from the depth of 110-125 feet. The results of a micropalaeontological examination of the sample are described in this report. The species of foraminifera recognised in the sample are listed.

  • This palaeontological collection comprises 100,000+ locality based samples derived from BMR/AGSO/GA field survey programs, from external organisations (e.g. exploration companies, state geological surveys), or from donations or bequests by private collectors over the last 100 years. It also includes laboratory subsamples, residues and microscope slides and is often referred to as the F Collection or Bulk Fossil Collection.

  • Two methods are outlined in this report. The first, is a method intended for the determination of porosity of consolidated sediments. The method is applicable to those sediments included in rotary drill cores and hand specimens of rock collected in the field. The second, is a method intended for the determination of permeability. It is applicable to suitably sized samples of rocks and any other substances whose constitutions permit of their being treated by the procedure set out in this method, subject to their own inherent limitations relative to this method. This report provides a detailed description of each of these methods.

  • This report gives an overview of the known bauxite resources of Victoria. Descriptions are given of the general geology of the area, of the individual deposits, and of the bauxite.

  • An examination of the deposits took place from 29th June to 13th July, 1950. Very heavy rains hampered the work, but it was possible to make a careful examination of the volcanic areas, and also to gain a general idea of the geological conditions. Some mapping was carried out by compass-pace methods but it is evident that more detailed surveying, with the use of aerial photographs, in order to produce a geological map of the D'Entrecasteaux group, would be worthwhile. An account of this examination and its results is given in this report. The general geology of the area and vegetation are described. The location, nature, extent and destruction of the sulphur deposits are discussed. A note on clays resulting from hydrothermal action upon volcanic flow rocks is appended.

  • Mapping carried out at Kuridala by C.J. Sullivan and R.S. Matheson during the period June 17th-27th has shown that the ore deposits occur in a major fault (and associated lesser shears). The existence of the fault system is considered to have been proved, and it has been traced, with some interruptions over a distance of three miles. It may extend for many miles beyond the present limits of mapping. The geological information given appears to rule out a number of chances of occurrence at shallow depth, formerly considered likely, and thus is somewhat discouraging. However, the work does indicate that repetition deposits are likely to be present and opens up intriguing possibilities.