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  • This deposit was examined in company with Mr. L.C. Ball, Chief Government Geologist of the Queensland Geological Survey on Wednesday, January 5th, 1944. It has previously been described in some detail by H.G.S. Cribb of the Geological Survey. Since Mr. Cribb's examination was made, the workings southwesterly from the shaft have been extended somewhat, but the owners, Messrs. Elver Bros., at the time of our visit were proposing to abandon that shaft on account of water and the fact that the drives were too long for economic working. The mining method used is expensive, slow and inefficient. Less than 50%, probably only about 30% of the bentonite is recovered by the existing procedure. This report details the origin of the deposits and proposals for future testing.

  • In the search for oil in Queensland, Drillers Limited, a subsidiary of Oil Search Limited, Sydney, put down a deep bore at Hutton Creek near Injune, in the parish of Simmie, county of Westgrove and 60 miles north of Roma. Drilling operations, which began in 1935 and ceased in 1938 when the depth of the bore was 4,688 feet, were carried out with a Commonwealth Government plant. The major part of the drilling was done by the percussion method, but cores were taken at various depths down to 4,678 feet. No samples were received for microscopic examination until the bore reached the depth of 650 feet, but from this depth to the bottom of the bore-hole, 638 samples of cuttings and cores were examined. Findings from a study of these samples are recorded in this report.

  • The following notes are intended to accompany Map No.1049, which has the same title as that given above. This map was prepared at the request of the Survey Directorate, L.H.Q., Melbourne, Department of the Army, and is primarily for the use of the Director of Survey, Advanced L.H.Q., Brisbane. The map is termed "provisional" since it is based on only a portion of the data available and the reductions have been made by approximate methods. Nevertheless since use has been made of that portion of the data which has been most recently observed it is considered the most reliable for most practical purposes. For some time work has been proceeding on a final map showing the distribution of magnetic inclination over Australia and the surrounding areas, and this map will be available in the near future.

  • The Gawler talc deposit is situated about 2 miles south from Ulverston and about half a mile north from Gawler where the bitumen road ends. The lease is held by Messrs. Pearson and Smith, and one man is working on it at present. A geological examination and plane table survey of the deposit was conducted on the 1st May, 1944.

  • In a memorandum dated 28th February, the Superintending Civil Engineer of the Department of the Interior stated that cracks were showing in the Cotter dam, and that these were serious enough to warrant an investigation as to whether there were minerals in the aggregate likely to cause expansion on decomposition. Visits were made to the Cotter dam and the adjacent rock quarries, and this report embodies the results of those visits and subsequent investigations. All possible geological factors likely to affect the stability and strength of the dam were investigated and, even though it was subsequently found that some of them could have little or no effect on the dam, they are discussed in this report.

  • A report on the Lake Cargellico magnesite deposit following a visit on 30th May, 1944.

  • The presence of quartz crystals in the dump of an old gold mine, known as Black Charlie's mine, in the Strathbogie Ranges led to the reopening of part of the workings in the search for crystal suitable for piezo-electric applications. To date the search has met with success, and has resulted in the discovery of a second crystal deposit adjacent to the old workings. The mine which is now named the Crystal King mine was visited in December, 1944. The locality, topography, geology, economic geology, and production of the mine are discussed in this report. A sketch section of the mine is included.

  • This report deals with the problem of detecting electrically resistive bodies of small size buried at shallow depths in wet soils. Detection was attempted by means of measurements made on the surface of the soil using the electrical resistivity method. The present report can be regarded as an extension of an earlier one (No. 1943/64B). The purpose of the new tests was twofold. Firstly it was proposed to make tests of 'normal' resistivity effects using a constant electrode arrangement and measuring the resistivity at closely spaced points on water saturated soils. The second part of the testing programme was contingent on the first part proving that under saturated conditions soil resistivities were sufficiently constant to warrent an attempt being made at detection. If this condition of constancy existed, it was proposed to extend the work of the tests, reviewed in the previous report, to actual field conditions. This has been done and the present report deals with the results obtained.

  • Report on the possibilities of underground water on Piney Creek pastoral lease. This report follows a visit to the lease conducted in response to a request for advice regarding water supply.

  • In 1935 Mr. F. Blake of the Geological Survey of Tasmania visited Cape Barren Island in connection with the underground water supply at Franklin Village which is situated on Sanford Bay in the northwest part of the island. He collected a small sample of fossiliferous limestone which he forwarded to the late Mr. F. Chapman who was then Commonwealth Palaeontologist. No examination of the material was made at the time. Recently it came under the notice of the writer who has made a detailed microscopic examination of it. The results of the examination are recorded in this report.