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  • This Bulletin presents the results of detailed studies of the Tertiary marine sequence in Gippsland, Victoria. Most of the information used in it has been obtained as a result of scout drilling jointly by the Victorian and Commonwealth Governments and of wildcat drilling by private companies. Though primarily a detailed study of a local problem, the results cannot frail to have an important bearing on the stratigraphy of the Tertiary rocks in the Australasian region and this in turn will facilitate the study of problems involving palaeogeography and correlation with extra Australian areas. The results will also have an important bearing on a major economic problem the search for oil in Australia.

  • Ajana is 66 miles north from Geraldton by rail and is the terminus of the branch railway which passes through Northampton mining district. Aspects of regional geology and mineral occurrence are discussed in these notes.

  • The samples of diatomite were received recently from the Director of the Geological Survey of New Zealand. The localities for the samples are given as Middlemarch, Wainui and Whirinaki. The three diatomites are of freshwater origin. The following notes are the result of microscopic examination.

  • In view of the shortage of tungsten supplies in allied countries, efforts are being made in Australia to increase production with a view to not only satisfying domestic requirements, but also exporting to Great Britain and the United States of America. The King Island scheelite mine is at present the largest producer of tungsten ore in Australia, and the possibilities of increased production from it were, therefore, among the first to be considered. Geological and geophysical surveys were made in June and July, 1942. A preliminary report was prepared in September and a drilling campaign drawn up to test the deposits with the object of proving sufficient ore-reserves to justify increased production for war purposes. Up till the present, fifteen drill holes have been completed and under a modified programme four remain to be drilled (two of these are in progress). This second preliminary report is based on the drilling and assaying results to date (details of thirteen holes are available).

  • A visit of inspection to the Lakes Entrance Shaft, with the object of making a collection of fossils from the sediments already excavated, was made on the 17th and 18th of December. The list of fossils recognised is fairly comprehensive but for the reasons stated it consists chiefly of small forms obtained by washing down the sandy marls. The approximate depths at which the various palaeontological horizons were encountered in the shaft are given below, the sequence and lithology of the beds being identical with that proved in all bores in the vicinity.

  • No. 27 Bore, Mirboo North, is one of a series of bores being drilled in that area to prove the extent of the bauxite deposits. This report describes the results of a microscopic examination of the samples taken from this bore. Samples were taken from between the depth of 0 to 83 feet.

  • This collection of fossils was made by Mr. H.J. Cook, Supervisor of the Lakes Entrance project during December, 1942. It consists chiefly of broken specimens of molluscan shells, the most important being a fragment of large Mitra, Fulgoraria ancilloides (Tate) and an almost complete specimen of Cypraea consobrina (McCoy). The importance of the discovery of the latter species is discussed in the report on my recent visit to the shaft, but the presence of the former (which had previously only been recorded from the Balcombian and has a length of 110 millimetres) in the present collection, again indicates that valuable information has been lost through inadequate sampling of a rich shelly zone in the Kalimnan stage.

  • This report follows a preliminary report dated 9th September, 1942, and it is not proposed to recapitulate the matter contained therein, although some references to the preliminary report are necessary. The principal purpose of a second visit to the Lakes was to determine accurately the area of useful salt-bearing surface and the nature of the beds. Much evidence confirmatory of the views expressed earlier regarding the structure of the lake beds was noted. However, a plane-table survey revealed that the total extent occupied by recoverable salt is considerably less than a casual inspection would suggest and consists of the following areas, which are shown on the accompanying plan.

  • The Chilcot copper mine is situated 15 miles south-south-west from Orange, from which it may be reached by reasonably good road. It was examined during 1942 by Dr. N.H. Fisher, Chief Geologist, Mineral Resources Survey, who recommended that a geophysical survey be made to search for additional ore shoots along the lode channel (1942/020). The geophysical survey was made during the three weeks ending 19th December. Operations were commenced over the area north-east of the mine, extending a distance of 550 feet from the mine, thus covering the part favoured by Dr. Fisher for extension of the lode channel. Later the survey was extended a similar distance to the south-west and the north-eastern part was extended a further 150 feet. Methods used comprised geomagnetic, spontaneous, polarisation, electro-magnetic and potential ratio. Traverses were placed at 50 feet intervals and observations by the various methods were made at intervals of 25 feet and, in some parts, at closer intervals. The results of this survey are discussed herein.

  • Bore No. 3797 on A. Holmes' property is situated about 25 miles north-west of Bore No. 3785 on W.R. Johnston's property reported upon 12/11/41, 19/1/42 and 11/3/42, and about 20 miles north of Bore No. 3752 on G.M. Taylor's property reported upon 1/9/41. The samples examined are from the depth of 50 feet down to 750 feet.