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  • The Officer Basin in South Australia and Western Australia is the focus of a regional stratigraphic study being undertaken by the Exploring for the Future (EFTF) program, an Australian Government initiative dedicated to increasing investment in resource exploration in Australia. This data release provides new data and discusses the results from a new commissioned petrographic study of rock samples from five wells of the Officer Basin including: GSWA Vines 1, Yowalga 3, Birksgate 1, Giles 1, and Munta 1. Data includes petrography, XRD, thin section scans and photos, as well as petrographic summaries

  • Exploration and management of minerals, energy and groundwater resources requires robust constraints on subsurface geology. Over the last decade the passive seismic technique has grown in popularity as it is one of a handful of non-invasive methods of imaging the subsurface. Given regional imaging relies on comparing records of ground motion between simultaneous deployments of seismometers deployed for over a year, consistency and quality of data collection lies at the heart of this technique. Here, we summarise the standard operating procedures developed by Geoscience Australia over the last 6 years for deployment, servicing and retrieval of passive seismic arrays. Our purpose is to share our experience and thereby contribute to improving the quality of passive seismic data being acquired across Australia. <b>Citation:</b> Holzschuh J., Gorbatov A., Glowacki J., Cooper A. & Cooper C., 2022. AusArray temporary passive seismic station deployment, servicing and retrieval: Geoscience Australia standard operating procedures. In: Czarnota, K. (ed.) Exploring for the Future: Extended Abstracts, Geoscience Australia, Canberra, https://dx.doi.org/10.26186/146999

  • Exploring for the Future (EFTF) is an Australian Government program led by Geoscience Australia (GA), in partnership with state and Northern Territory governments. The EFTF program (2016-2024) aims to drive industry investment in resource exploration in frontier regions of onshore Australia by providing new precompetitive data and information about their energy, mineral and groundwater resource potential. Under the EFTF program, the Onshore Energy Project undertook a study of petroleum prospectivity of the onshore Officer Basin in South Australia and Western Australia. Birksgate 1 well in South Australia was selected based on the occurrence of gas and oil shows reported in the well completion report. Sampling of cuttings and cores was done at Geoscience Australia's Petroleum Data Repository in Canberra. Geoscience Australia commissioned a fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) study on the downhole samples. Here, volatile components ostensibly trapped with fluid inclusions are released and analysed revealing the level of exposure of the well section to migrating fluids. Integration of thin section (TS) preparations reveal to extent of gas and fluid trapping within fluid inclusions while microthemometry (MT) gives an estimation of fluid inclusion trapping temperature. For Birksgate 1, FIS analysis was performed on 414 cuttings and 33 cores between 150 feet and 6161 feet base depth, together with 14 samples prepared for TS and 3 samples for MT. To support this study, lithostratigraphic tops were compiled by Geoscience Australia. The results of the study are found in the accompanying documents.

  • Alkaline and related rocks are a relatively rare class of igneous rocks worldwide. Alkaline rocks encompass a wide range of rock types and are mineralogically and geochemically diverse. They are typically though to have been derived by generally small to very small degrees of partial melting of a wide range of mantle compositions. As such these rocks have the potential to convey considerable information on the evolution of the Earth’s mantle (asthenosphere and lithosphere), particularly the role of metasomatism which may have been important in their generation or to which such rocks may themselves have contributed. Such rocks, by their unique compositions and or enriched source protoliths, also have considerable metallogenic potential, e.g., diamonds, Th, U, Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta, REEs. It is evident that the geographic occurrences of many of these rock types are also important, and may relate to presence of old cratons, craton margins or major lithospheric breaks. Finally, many alkaline rocks also carry with them mantle xenoliths providing a snapshot of the lithospheric mantle composition at the time of their emplacement. Accordingly, although Alkaline and related rocks comprise only a volumetrically minor component of the geology of Australia, they are of considerable importance to studies of lithospheric composition, evolution and architecture and to helping constrain the temporal evolution of the lithosphere, as well as more directly to metallogenesis and mineralisation. This contribution presents the first part of an ongoing compilation of the distribution and geology of alkaline and related rocks throughout Australia. The report and accompanying GIS document alkaline and related rocks of Archean age. All are from the Pilbara and Yilgarn Cratons of Western Australia. The report also reviews the nomenclature of alkaline rocks and classification procedures. GIS metadata is documented in the appendices.

  • Stratigraphic drill hole NDI Carrara 1 was drilled as a collaboration between Geoscience Australia (GA), the Northern Territory Geological Survey (NTGS) and the Mineral Exploration Cooperative Research Centre (MinEx CRC). It reached a total depth of 1751 m in late 2020 and is the first drill hole to intersect the undifferentiated Proterozoic rocks of the Carrara Sub-Basin. It intersected approximately 630 m of Cambrian Georgina Basin sedimentary rocks overlying the ~1100 m of Proterozoic carbonates, black shales and other siliciclastics of the Carrara Sub-Basin succession. The formational assignments of the Georgina Basin succession are preliminary and were assigned in the field. The units intersected comprise the Border Waterhole Formation (~531m to ~630m), which is overlain by the Currant Bush Limestone (~249m to ~531m), which in turn is overlain by the Camooweal Dolostone (0m to ~249m). Of these, only the lower 80% of the Currant Bush Limestone and the entire Border Waterhole Formation were cored. This report presents biostratigraphic results from macrofossil examination of NDI Carrara 1 core samples within the Georgina Basin section.

  • This animation shows how Airborne Electromagnetic Surveys Work. It is part of a series of Field Activity Technique Engagement Animations. The target audience are the communities that are impacted by our data acquisition activities. There is no sound or voice over. The 2D animations include a simplified view of what AEM equipment looks like, what the equipment measures and how the survey works.

  • This animation shows how borehole geophysical surveys are conducted. It is part of a series of Field Activity Technique Engagement Animations. The target audience are the communities that are impacted by GA's data acquisition activities. There is no sound or voice over. The 2D animation includes a simplified view of what borehole geophysics equipment looks like, what the equipment measures and how scientists use the data.

  • This Record documents the efforts of Mineral Resources Tasmania (MRT) and Geoscience Australia (GA) in compiling a geochronology (age) compilation for Tasmania, describing both the dataset itself and the process by which it is incorporated into the continental-scale Isotopic Atlas of Australia. The Isotopic Atlas draws together age and isotopic data from across the country and provides visualisations and tools to enable non-experts to extract maximum value from these datasets. Data is added to the Isotopic Atlas in a staged approach with priorities determined by GA- and partner-driven focus regions and research questions. This Tasmanian compilation represents the second in a series of compilation publications (Records and Datasets) for the southern states of Australia, which are a foundation for the second phase of the Exploring for the Future initiative over 2020–2024. It was compiled primarily from data, reports, journal articles and theses provided to GA by MRT. The most current data can be accessed and downloaded from GA’s <a href=https://portal.ga.gov.au/persona/geochronology>EFTF Geochronology and Isotopes Data Portal</a> and MRT’s <a href=https://www.mrt.tas.gov.au/mrt_maps/app/list/map>LISTmap.</a>

  • The ISOTOPE database stores compiled age and isotopic data from a range of published and unpublished (GA and non-GA) sources. This internal database is only publicly accessible through the webservices given as links on this page. This data compilation includes sample and bibliographic links. The data structure currently supports summary ages (e.g., U-Pb and Ar/Ar) through the INTERPRETED_AGES tables, as well as extended system-specific tables for Sm-Nd, Pb-Pb, Lu-Hf and O- isotopes. The data structure is designed to be extensible to adapt to evolving requirements for the storage of isotopic data. ISOTOPE and the data holdings were initially developed as part of the Exploring for the Future (EFTF) program. During development of ISOTOPE, some key considerations in compiling and storing diverse, multi-purpose isotopic datasets were developed: 1) Improved sample characterisation and bibliographic links. Often, the usefulness of an isotopic dataset is limited by the metadata available for the parent sample. Better harvesting of fundamental sample data (and better integration with related national datasets such as Australian Geological Provinces and the Australian Stratigraphic Units Database) simplifies the process of filtering an isotopic data compilation using spatial, geological and bibliographic criteria, as well as facilitating ‘audits’ targeting missing isotopic data. 2) Generalised, extensible structures for isotopic data. The need for system-specific tables for isotopic analyses does not preclude the development of generalised data-structures that reflect universal relationships. GA has modelled relational tables linking system-specific Sessions, Analyses, and interpreted data-Groups, which has proven adequate for all of the Isotopic Atlas layers developed thus far. 3) Dual delivery of ‘derived’ isotopic data. In some systems, it is critical to capture the published data (i.e. isotopic measurements and derived values, as presented by the original author) and generate an additional set of derived values from the same measurements, calculated using a single set of reference parameters (e.g. decay constant, depleted-mantle values, etc.) that permit ‘normalised’ portrayal of the data compilation-wide. 4) Flexibility in data delivery mode. In radiogenic isotope geochronology (e.g. U-Pb, Ar-Ar), careful compilation and attribution of ‘interpreted ages’ can meet the needs of much of the user-base, even without an explicit link to the constituent analyses. In contrast, isotope geochemistry (especially microbeam-based methods such as Lu-Hf via laser ablation) is usually focused on the individual measurements, without which interpreted ‘sample-averages’ have limited value. Data delivery should reflect key differences of this kind.

  • Alkaline and related rocks are a relatively rare class of igneous rocks worldwide. Alkaline rocks encompass a wide range of rock types and are mineralogically and geochemically diverse. They are typically though to have been derived by generally small to very small degrees of partial melting of a wide range of mantle compositions. As such these rocks have the potential to convey considerable information on the evolution of the Earth’s mantle (asthenosphere and lithosphere), particularly the role of metasomatism which may have been important in their generation or to which such rocks may themselves have contributed. Such rocks, by their unique compositions and or enriched source protoliths, also have considerable metallogenic potential, e.g., diamonds, Th, U, Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta, REEs. It is evident that the geographic occurrences of many of these rock types are also important, and may relate to presence of old cratons, craton margins or major lithospheric breaks. Finally, many alkaline rocks also carry with them mantle xenoliths providing a snapshot of the lithospheric mantle composition at the time of their emplacement. Accordingly, although Alkaline and related rocks comprise only a volumetrically minor component of the geology of Australia, they are of considerable importance to studies of lithospheric composition, evolution and architecture and to helping constrain the temporal evolution of the lithosphere, as well as more directly to metallogenesis and mineralisation. This GIS product presents the first part of an ongoing compilation of the distribution and geology of alkaline and related rocks throughout Australia. The accompanying report document alkaline and related rocks of Archean age. All are from the Pilbara and Yilgarn Cratons of Western Australia. The report also reviews the nomenclature of alkaline rocks and classification procedures. GIS metadata is documented in the appendices.