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  • This record contains geological notes on solid geology interpretation of 1:250 000 Sheet areas in the Northern Territory and Queensland. There are five layers in the dataset: Pre-Neoproterozoic, Neoproterozoic, Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Preparation of these layers involved figuratively peeling off successively older rocks and identifying and outlining the rocks thereby revealed. The notes provide comments on the rocks comprising each layer, and explain how the identity of the revealed rocks was arrived at where this is not obvious. The Cenozoic time slice was extracted from the 1:1M scale outcrop geology (Raymond et al., 2012) after removing the surficial deposits and without further interpretation.

  • The Solid Geology of the North Australian Craton web service delivers a seamless chronostratigraphic solid geology dataset of the North Australian Craton that covers north of Western Australia, Northern Territory and north-west Queensland. The data maps stratigraphic units concealed under cover by effectively removing the overlying cover (Liu et al., 2015). This dataset comprises five chronostratigraphic time slices, namely: Cenozoic, Mesozoic, Paleozoic, Neoproterozoic, and Pre-Neoproterozoic.

  • This web service provides access to datasets produced by the mineral potential assement of iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) mineral systems in the Tennant Creek – Mt Isa region. The mineral potential assessment uses a 2D, GIS-based workflow to qualitatively map four key mineral system components: (1) Sources of metals, fluids and ligands, (2) Energy to drive fluid flow, (3) Fluid flow pathways and architecture, and (4) Deposition mechanisms, such as redox or chemical gradients. For each of these key mineral system components theoretical criteria, representing important ore-forming processes, were identified and translated into mappable proxies using a wide range of input datasets. Each of these criteria are weighted and combined using an established workflow to produce the final map of IOCG potential.

  • The Bedrock Geology of South Australia was produced by removing unconsolidated materials. The pre-Silurian geology was based on solid geology layers by the Geological Survey of South Australia (via SARIG). Younger geology was interpreted by Geoscience Australia (GA), based on GA's 1:1,000,000 scale Surface Geology of Australia (2012). Descriptions of mapped geological units are housed in Geoscience Australia's Stratigraphic Names Database, which can be linked to other geoscience databases in Geoscience Australia.

  • The Solid Geology of the North Australian Craton web service delivers a seamless chronostratigraphic solid geology dataset of the North Australian Craton that covers north of Western Australia, Northern Territory and north-west Queensland. The data maps stratigraphic units concealed under cover by effectively removing the overlying cover (Liu et al., 2015). This dataset comprises five chronostratigraphic time slices, namely: Cenozoic, Mesozoic, Paleozoic, Neoproterozoic, and Pre-Neoproterozoic.

  • The Pre-Cenozoic Geology of South Australia, New South Wales and Victoria removes Cenozoic geology. It is largely based on (1) the 1:1,000,000 Surface Geology by Geoscience Australia (2012) for New South Wales; (2) the Victoria seamless geology (2014); and (3) solid geology layers of South Australia by the Geological Survey of South Australia (2016), plus interpretation in GA of potential filed geophysical datasets, particularly magnetic data. The South Australia solid geology layers available on SARIG were used for Archaean to Ordovician geology of the state. Post-Ordovician geology of South Australia were interpreted in GA using magnetic data. The 1:1,000,000 surface geology map of the Mount Painter Region by S.B. Hore (2015) was also used. Solid geology was produced with the aid of interpretation of magnetic data for that region. For the Murray Basin and surrounding areas drill hole data were used to determine the geology under cover. Because extents of drill hole intercepted geology are not know in most cases. Such geology are shown as tiny circular polygons. The author thanks a number of state and GA geologists for their inputs at various stages of the project, particularly those who reviewed the data.

  • The Solid Geology of the North Australian Craton web service delivers a seamless chronostratigraphic solid geology dataset of the North Australian Craton that covers north of Western Australia, Northern Territory and north-west Queensland. The data maps stratigraphic units concealed under cover by effectively removing the overlying cover (Liu et al., 2015). This dataset comprises five chronostratigraphic time slices, namely: Cenozoic, Mesozoic, Paleozoic, Neoproterozoic, and Pre-Neoproterozoic.

  • <p>The Solid Geology of the North Australian Craton 1:1M scale dataset 1st edition (2020) is a seamless chronostratigraphic solid geology dataset of the North Australian Craton that covers north of Western Australia, Northern Territory and north-west Queensland. The data maps stratigraphic units concealed under cover by effectively removing the overlying cover (Liu et al., 2015). This dataset comprises five chronostratigraphic time slices, namely: Cenozoic, Mesozoic, Paleozoic, Neoproterozoic, and Pre-Neoproterozoic. As an example, the Mesozoic time slice (or layer) shows Mesozoic age geology that would be present if all Cenozoic units were removed. The Pre-Neoproterozoic time slice shows what would be visible if all Neoproterozoic, Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic units were removed. <p>Geological units are represented as polygon and line geometries and, are attributed with information regarding stratigraphic nomenclature and hierarchy, age, lithology, and primary data source. The datasets also contains geological contacts, structural features, such as faults and shears, and miscellaneous supporting lines like crater impacts or structural grain within stratigraphic units. <p>This is the second staged release of Geoscience Australia's national time based solid geology mapping program commenced under the Federal Government’s Exploring for the Future program. The Cenozoic time slice layer was extracted from Raymond, O.L., Liu, S., Gallagher, R., Highet, L.M., Zhang, W., 2012. Surface Geology of Australia, 1:1 000 000 scale, 2012 edition [Digital Dataset]. Geoscience Australia, Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra. http://www.ga.gov.au and retains the data schema of that dataset. For this layer’s metadata, refer to http://pid.geoscience.gov.au/dataset/ga/74619 <p>NOTE: Specialised Geographic Information System (GIS) software is required to view this data.

  • This web service provides access to datasets produced by the mineral potential assement of iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) mineral systems in the Tennant Creek – Mt Isa region. The mineral potential assessment uses a 2D, GIS-based workflow to qualitatively map four key mineral system components: (1) Sources of metals, fluids and ligands, (2) Energy to drive fluid flow, (3) Fluid flow pathways and architecture, and (4) Deposition mechanisms, such as redox or chemical gradients. For each of these key mineral system components theoretical criteria, representing important ore-forming processes, were identified and translated into mappable proxies using a wide range of input datasets. Each of these criteria are weighted and combined using an established workflow to produce the final map of IOCG potential.

  • Solid geology of the Tennant Creek to Mount Isa (TISA) area comprises four layers, namely: Mesozoic, Paleozoic, Neoproterozoic and Pre-Neoproterozoic. This is the first staged release of Geoscience Australia's national time based solid geology mapping program commenced under the Federal Government’s Exploring for the Future program. This product will be updated as the solid geology program progresses. The solid geology layers were produced by interpretation of magnetic and gravity datasets and reference to available solid and surface geology maps, particularly GA's 1:1 M scale surface geology of Australia (2012), published 1:250 k scale map sheets, and the Northern Territory Geological Survey's solid geology maps of the Pine Creek (2005) and Tennant regions (2004). Drill hole constraints have been utilised where possible. Interpretations were compiled at 1:250 k scale and the final product is best utilised at this scale. Notably this release reveals the concealed extent of the Cambrian basalts of the Kalkarindji Igneous Suite, which extend over a large part of the TISA area.