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  • SIFRA is the acronym for 'System for Infrastructure Facility Resilience Analysis'. The system provides an analytical approach for modelling the vulnerability of high-value infrastructure facilities by taking into consideration the fragilities and configurations of its constituent components. In doing this it uses a network theory based approach for modelling the facility and its operations. This method makes it possible to consider the discrete component-level vulnerabilities within a facility and, significantly, their system-level operational implications to the composite facility fragility. SIFRA also includes tools for modelling system restoration times under varied levels of resource allocation scenarios, and for identifying component criticality.

  • Geoscience Australia's World Wind Viewer is an application developed using NASA's World Wind Java Software Development Kit (SDK) to display Australia's continental data sets. The viewer allows you to compare national data sets such as the radioelements, the gravity and magnetic anomalies, and other mapping layers, and show the data draped over the Australian terrain in three dimensions.

  • The Quick Attribute Calculator v.1.0 is a toolbar developed for use with ArcGIS 9.3 on Windows XP. It enables a user to select an attribute from a drop-down list and change the value of a sub-set for bulk updates.

  • The source code for the AusSeabed Survey Coordination Tool. Code is located at: https://github.com/ausseabed/survey-request-and-planning-tool The AusSeabed Survey Coordination tool (ASB SCT) is a tool designed by GA and FrontierSI in collaboration with the AusSeabed Steering Committee and broader community. Its intent is to provide a location for, and consistency in specification of bathymetric data acquisition for scientific research purposes. As of March 2022, the ASB SCT supports three key functions: 1) Survey Planning: the ASB SCT allows the community to publicise their plans to survey in the Austrlian Marine Estate. The tool ingests a spatial outline of the intended location as well as the target data types and focus for the survey. The tool also collects the contact details for the chief investigator and anticipated survey dates. Once published, the survey plan is visible on the upcoming surveys spatial layer on the AusSeabed portal. 2) Hydroscheme Industry Partnership Program Requests: the ASB SCT hosts the online form for submitting survey requests to the Australian Hydrographic Office (AHO) for consideration by the HydroScheme Industry Partnership Programme. 3) Areas of Interest submission: the ASB SCT ingests submissions that describe a users seabed mapping or biodiversity characterisation data needs and location. This information is useful in identifying regions of mutual interest and boosting collaborative multi-disciplinary surveys. Understanding regions with high levels of overlapping data needs can also help inform high-value survey activities and legacy data release priorities.

  • SUNAZ is a set of computer programs comprising SUNAZ and SUNIN to calculate azimuth-by-hour-angle observations of the Sun to determine true north azimuth to an azimuth mark based on the observing proforma described in K.A. Weinert (1980), Notes on Geomagnetic Observatory and Survey Practice, Earth Science 5, UNESCO, paragraph 246, page 36, using the algorithm described in G.G.Bennett (1980), "A Solar Ephemeris for use with Programmable Calculators", The Australian Surveyor, Vol.30, No.3, pp 147-151.

  • <p>The Isotopic Atlas of Australia is one of the fundamental datasets in Geoscience Australia (GA)’s Exploring for the Future program. It is underpinned by a nationwide coverage of high-quality U-Th-Pb radiometric dates, mostly determined by Sensitive High Resolution Ion Micro Probe (SHRIMP). For the past decade, GA and the international SHRIMP community have relied on SQUID 2.50 software to process isotopic data acquired by SHRIMP for U-Th-Pb geochronology. However, SQUID 2.50 is obsolete because of dependency on Excel 2003, which is unsupported by Microsoft and will not operate on Windows 10. As a result, GA collaborated with the Cyber Infrastructure Research and Development Laboratory for Earth Sciences (CIRDLES.org) at the College of Charleston (USA) to redeploy SQUID 2.50 algorithms in an open-source, platform-independent and freely available Java application (Squid3). Squid3 replicates (rather than seeking to enhance) SQUID 2.50 logic and arithmetic, with substantial improvements in flexibility and interactivity. In this paper, we review documentation detailing widely trusted but little-known SQUID 2.50 algorithms and provide an overview of Squid3, focusing on the implementation and improvement of SQUID 2.50 functionality. The beta version of Squid3 is capable of end-to-end U-Th-Pb data processing, from ingestion of raw SHRIMP .xml files, through finalised summary calculations, to reporting of data arrays suitable for visualisation via packages such as Isoplot, Topsoil and IsoplotR. In production, Squid3 will enable users to sever links with Excel 2003, while ensuring the sustainability, reliability and relevance of SHRIMP data. <p><b>Citation:</b> Bodorkos, S., Bowring, J.F., and Rayner, N.M., 2020. Squid3: Next-generation data processing software for Sensitive High Resolution Ion Micro Probe (SHRIMP). In: Czarnota, K., Roach, I., Abbott, S., Haynes, M., Kositcin, N., Ray, A. and Slatter, E. (eds.) Exploring for the Future: Extended Abstracts, Geoscience Australia, Canberra, 1–4.

  • Program PRINSAS (PRocessing and INterpretation of Small Angle Scattering data) takes raw SANS, SAXS, USANS and USAXS data, stores the data, and allows the user to further process and interpret the data. Although any small angle scattering data can be accepted, PRINSAS has been specifically designed for the processing and interpretation of SAS data for rocks and other media with a wide distribution of scatterer sizes.

  • RICS (Rapid Inventory Collection System) is a vehicular data collection system. It collects geo-tagged imagery and user added property damage-level information. The system consists of Ethernet cameras, tripods, circuitry and the RICS software that runs on a laptop. It was successfully deployed following the 2009 Victorian Bushfires, the 2010 Kalgoorlie and Christchurch Earthquakes, the 2011 Brisbane floods and TC Yassi.

  • This software supports GeoSCiML and was developed by GA and is called Fullmoon. This software will hosted on CSIRO's SEEGRID Site.

  • The majority of boundaries submitted to the Australian Exposure Information Platform (AEIP) process relatively quickly, usually under 20 minutes. Occasionally however, very complex boundaries are submitted that cause processing issues. The intent of this document is to, at a high-level, highlight the various types of complex boundaries and geometry errors that cause processing issues and offer solutions to improve the turnaround time for Exposure Report production.